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Full text of "Hillhead High School war memorial volume"




HILLHEAD 

HIGH 5CH00I 

WAR 

MEMORIAL 

VOLVnE 




rstef. II . a.. 3a 



National Library of Scotland 

UllllUllHIllll 

*B000502274* 









L«3P 



Hillhcad High School 




Wrr Memorial Volume 



PUBLISHED BY THE HILLHEAD HIGH SCHOOL 

WAR MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 

1921 



PRINTED BY 

WILLIAM HODGE AND COMPANY, LIMITED 

GLASGOW AND EDINBURGH 






PREFACE. 

Little requires to be said by way of introduction to this volume. Those gallant men, 
old pupils of Hillhead High School, whose names are here recorded, have fashioned 
their own memorial in deeds that have no need of ornament. But it is right and 
fitting that their old School, which bore so large a part in moulding their character, 
should wish to honour and perpetuate the names of those whose shining valour has 
ennobled both them and her. The spirit of self-sacrifice that they showed was not 
created by the war. It but gave an opportunity for the display on a world-wide stage 
of qualities already acquired in the home, in the School, on the playing field, in 
the warehouse, the workshop, and counting house. 

The 945 names here recorded comprise, so far as has been ascertained, all former 
pupils who served in the war. All ranks and all arms of the Service are repre- 
sented and all the fighting fronts. By far the larger portion of them joined up from 
the homeland, but from the ends of the earth, over dividing mountains and across 
estranging seas, our old boys rallied to the call. 

This volume, together with the mural tablets in the School Hall, is specially 
intended as a memorial of those who fell. They number, so far as known, 175, and it 
is only an act of seemly piety that the inheritors of their places and of their traditions 
should reverently scan the long array and seek to make the names there enshrined 
familiar as household words. Death came to them in every guise — in the air, on the 
land, on the sea. Their graves are severed by vast distances and by a waste of seas, 
but, sepulchred near or far, they have all a common resting place in the grateful hearts 
of their countrymen. 

It is our joy and pride to be of the same blood, children of a common mother, and 
it is our hope and prayer that all future generations of pupils will take knowledge of 
them and carry forward their torch of high endeavour. 



CONTENTS, 



Preface, 



Extracts from School Magazine — 

The Call to Service, 1915, - - - - - - 7 

Victory— Christmas, 1918, - - - - - 8 

Synopses — 

A. — Roll of Service, - 10 

B. — Regimental Analysis, - - - - - - 10 

C. — War Honours, - - - - - - - 13 

D. — Pro Patria, - ...... 13 

Roll of Service, -------- 14 

War Honours, --------- 52 

Pro Patria — 

A. — List of Fallen, ------ 62 

B. — Memorial Tablet, ---.... 73 

C. — Portraits, -------- 74 

D. — Biographies, - ----.-. 119 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/hillheadhighscho1921hill 



Extracts from School Magazine. 



THE CALL TO SERVICE 1915. 

This issue of the School Magazine is essentially a War Number. The great 
world drama now being unfolded on so many widely separated stages rivets all our 
attention, and absorbs all our thought. Nothing else matters. And so the Magazine 
is shorn of many of its old features, and is largely devoted to our old pupils who 
have responded so nobly to the call for service. Let it not be forgotten that the 
homes from which our boys went forth to war were in no sense military or militant. 
So far as I know, only one of our old boys was in the Regular Army when 
war began. Their interests and their parents' interests, like those of the great 
mass of the nation, were all along the lines of peaceful pursuits. Not one of them, 
I am sure, ever looked for the daily routine of their lives to be broken by even 
the distant singing of a bullet. Yet when the call of duty came, loud, clear, 
insistent, our youth sprang to arms as if fighting had been their profession. This 
spontaneous response of a free and peace-loving people (for our boys were but typical 
of the great mass of the people) has never been equalled in the world's history, and 
is proof that the great heart of the nation still beats true to the best and highest 
traditions of the past. 

The School may well be proud of the splendid lead given by its former pupils. 
The Roll of Honour now contains the names of almost 600 pupils, of whom 200 hold 
commissions. The number of the latter would have been much greater had the 
response of our boys to the first call been less prompt and general. They did not 
wait for commissions, but with a pure and unselfish patriotism joined the ranks at 
once, qualified though they were by education, character, and training for commis- 
sioned rank. As privates and non-commissioned officers they have made themselves 
so invaluable that commanding officers can hardly be persuaded now to part with 
them. These privates of the first hundred thousand hold a specially warm place in 
the affection of the School. 

A scrutiny of the Roll of Honour shows that it has been recruited from many 
lands. The Homeland, of course, comes first, but Canada, Australia, New Zealand, 
South Africa, India, the States, South America have each sent a quota, proving 
that the Motherland has still the gift of keeping alive, across estranging seas, round 
half a world, the love and reverence of her sons. In addition to Artillery, Engineer, 
Army Service Corps, and R.A.M.C. units, 62 different regiments, Scottish, English, 
Irish, Colonial, are represented on the list, and our old boys will be found fighting 
in every section of our " far-flung battle line." Ten members of the staff are 
already on the Roll, and others are ready to go when the Education Department 
grants them permission. This depletion of the staff places a severe strain on those 

7 



Hillhead High School 



who remain, but the pupils are reported to be quite satisfied with the amount of 
attention they still receive. 

The School deeply regrets to record that 29 of her gallant sons have already 
laid down their life for King and country. We grieve for them cut off when life 
was just opening out before them, life in some cases already of bright achievement, 
in all of high promise. The School in respectful sympathy sorrows with the relatives 
and friends, but with sorrow is mingled a just pride that when the call came they 
were found faithful even unto death. Like Crusaders of old, they have fallen in 
defence of a pure and lofty ideal, and have won for themselves a glory that grows 
not old. It will be the duty and the high privilege of their old School to treasure 
through all generations the memory of their splendid loyalty, devotion, and self- 
surrender, and to take ever-fresh inspiration from their example. 

The part played by our former girl pupils is all too inadequately represented 
by the few names on the Roll of Honour. Yet, in a sense, it is better so, for it throws 
into high relief the fact that it is impossible to record the names of all our girls 
who are giving whole-hearted service at this time, for their name is legion. When 
the full history of the war comes to be written, not the least splendid of its pages 
will be that recording the self-sacrificing labours of women. Their infinite resource 
in service, their courage in trial, their fortitude in sorrow have given a new dignity 
and an added meaning to the name of woman. 

The School salutes its devoted daughters. The School salutes its gallant sons. 
God guard, and bless, and keep them. 



VICTORY-CHRISTMAS, 1918. 

It has been well said that in all things we are unequal to the events of this 
hour. " Not only are we unable to express what we feel, we cannot even feel what 
we would express." The past four years seem like a hideous nightmare from which 
we have awaked still dazed and stupefied. During that time disappointment, defeat, 
and grave vicissitudes of fortune have largely been our portion. The Schoolboy 
point of view of our experience was ingenuously expressed by one pupil who com- 
plained that German schools were always having victory holidays, while up almost 
to the last we had not a single one. And owing to the lack of imagination on the 
part of the Government the first and last holiday petered out in somewhat inglorious 
fashion. All through these testing days the very stars in their courses seemed 
to conspire against us. Again and again the elements appeared leagued with our 
enemies, and rain, fog, snow, robbed us of the victory that was our due. It is no 
wonder therefore that many hearts began to faint and fail, and some even in high 
places were heard to whisper that victory was impossible, or that a draw was the 
best that could be hoped for. Fortunately, others were made of sterner stuff. 

During the siege of La Rochelle the citizens were reduced to such extremities 
that the Mayor and some of his councillors spoke of surrender, and even appointed 



Victory — Christmas, 1918 



envoys to ask for terms from the enemy. A more resolute section, however, took 
matters into their own hands, deposed the Mayor, and elected in his stead a bluff 
sea captain. On taking his seat for the first time in the Council Chamber he laid 
on the table a ponderous pistol. " What is that for? " said some of the members. 
" That is for the first man who talks of surrender," replied the grim old seaman. 
Happily, our leaders, or most of them, were worthy peers of this dauntless captain, 
and abated not one jot of heart or hope even in the darkest hour. In this they 
but reflected the spirit of the great majority of the nation. A common purpose, a 
common faith, and, alas, a common sorrow kept them united and resolute throughout. 

Now, when victory has come there is no sign of insolent triumph or impious 
arrogance. " The shadow of death has been turned into the morning," but the 
shadow of that shadow is still with us. To most of us even the pealing bells of 
victory had a dying fall, and to some the sound as of a requiem. 

In the great adventure of these years the School has nobly played its part. 
Eight hundred and fifty of our old boys are known to have answered the call, and 
of these 140 have fallen. For four years we have been living on the heights. Before 
we go down into the valley of the daily round, the common task, where the memory 
of the prodigal sacrifice, the matchless devotion, and the infinite sufferings of these 
years will gradually grow dim, let us raise our cairn of memorial to those whose 
valour and stoutness of heart have bought for us the glory of this hour. 



SYNOPSES. 



A.— ROLL OF SERVICE. 



Former Pupils of School, 
Ex-Cadets of Cadet Corps, 
Ex-Cadets of O.T.C., 
Staff, 



Ladies, 



Total, 
Total, 



Officers. 


Other Ranks. 


Total. 


262 


363 


625 


68 


35 


103 


78 


96 


174 


18 


6 


24 


426 


500 


926 


- 


- 


19 


- 


- 


945 



B.— REGIMENTAL ANALYSIS. 



I— NAVY. 

Royal Navy, 

Royal Naval Reserve, - 

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, 

Royal Naval Motor Boat Reserve - 

Transport Service, - - - - - 

II.-ARMY. 

Cavalry — 

1st (Royal) Dragoons, 
2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys), 
4th (Queen's Own) Hussars, 
7th (Queen's Own) Hussars, 
North Irish Horse, - - - 

Ayrshire Yeomanry, - 
Lanarkshire Yeomanry, 
1st County of London Yeomanry, 
Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry, 
Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, 
Scottish Horse, - - . - 

10 



Officers. 


Other Ranks. 


Total. 


3 


4 


7 


10 


4 


14 


4 


4 


8 


— 


1 


1 


4 


— 


4 


officers. 


Other Ranks. 


Total. 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


3 


3 


— 


1 


1 


— 


13 


13 





1 


1 


1 


6 


7 



Synopses 



Royal Regiment of Artillery — 

Royal Field Artillery, - 

Royal Garrison Artillery, 
Honourable Artillery Company, 
Corps of Royal Engineers — 

Royal Engineers, 

Inland Water Transport, 
Foot Guards — 

Coldstream Guards, 

Scots Guards, - 
Infantry — 

R. Scots, 

R. Lane. R., - 

North'd Fus., - 

R. Fus., 

L'pool R., 

Norf. R., 

E. York R., - 

Bedf. R., 

York R., 

Lan. Fus., 

R. Sco. Fus., - 

K.O. Sco. Bord., 

Sco. Rif., 

W. Rid. R., - 

Bord. R., 

R. Suss. R., - 

S. Lan. R., - 

Welsh R., 

R. Highrs., 

Notts & Derby R., 

Yorks. L.I., - 

Midd'x R;, 

N. Staff. R., - 

Durh. L.I., 

High. L.I., 

Sea. Highrs., 

Gord. Highrs., 

Cam'n. Highrs., 

R. Ir. Rif., 

Conn. Rang., - 

Arg. & Suth'd: Highrs., 

R. Dub. Fus., 
Army Cyclist Corps, 



21 


24 


45 


16 


8 


24 


— 


2 


2 


23 


19 


42 


1 


— 


1 





1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


9 


17 


20 


2 


— 


2 


3 


— 


3 


1 


5 


6 


1 


3 


4 


2 


— 


2 


2 


— 


2 


— 


1 


1 


2 


— 


2 


— 


1 


1 


14 


12 


26 


3 


8 


11 


30 


33 


63 


1 


— 


1 


2 


— 


2 


1 


— 


1 


1 


1 


2 


— 


2 


2 


6 


5 


11 


1 


— 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


78 


92 


170 


9 


10 


15 


3 


9 


12 


7 


17 


24 


2 


— 


o 


— 


1 


1 


25 


15 


40 


1 


— 


1 


2 


1 


3 



Hillhead High School 



Machine Gun Corps — 










I. — Infantry, - 


- 


7 


5 


12 


II. — Cavalry, 


- 


1 


— 


1 


Tank Corps, 


- 


7 


— 


7 


Training Reserve, - 


- 


— 


2 


2 


Labour Corps, 




4 


1 


5 


The London Regiment (Territorial Force) — 








10th Batt. (Hackney), 


- 


— 


1 


1 


14th Batt. (Loudon Scottish), - 


- 


1 


8 


9 


16th Batt. (Queen's Westminster 


Rifles), 


— 


1 


1 


■ 17th Batt. (Poplar and Stepney Rifles), 


— 


1 


1 


19th Batt. (St. Pancras), 


- 


3 


— 


3 


Inns of Court O.T.C., 




— 


2 


2 


General List (New Armies), 




2 


— 


2 


Royal Army Service Corps, - 




5 


18 


23 


Royal Army Medical Corps, 




32 


22 


54 


Royal Army Ordnance Corps, 


- 


1 


4 


5 


Royal Army Veterinary Corps, 




— 


1 


1 


Army Chaplains' Department, 


- 


1 


— 


1 


Unattached List (T.F.) O.T.C.— 










A. — Senior, 


- 


— 


6 


6 


B. — Junior, 


- 


3 


19 


22 


Oversea Forces — 










Australian Imperial Forces, 


. 


4 


5 


9 


Australian Army Medical Corps, 


- 


1 


— 


1 


Canada, 


- 


10 


28 


38 


New Zealand, - 




1 


2 


3 


South Africa, - 


- 


2 


1 


3 


Indian Army, - 




14 


— 


14 


Indian Army Medical Service, 




1 


— 


1 


Malay States, - 




1 


1 


2 


Indian Defence Force, 


- 


— 


2 


2 


Royal Marines — 










Royal Marine Artillery, 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Royal Marine Engineers, 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Special Lists — 










West African Frontier Force, 


- 


1 


— 


1 


The King's African Rifles, 


■ 


1 


" 


1 


III- 


AIR FORCE. 












Officers. 


Other Ranks. 


Total. 


Royal Air Force, 




25 


27 


52 


Roval Air Force Medical Service, - 


- 


1 


— 


1 



12 



Synopses 



IV— VARIOUS. 



United States Army, 

Anglo American Ambulance Corps, 

Legion of Frontiersmen, 

Scottish Red Cross, 

Regiment Unknown, 

Total, 



Officers. 


Other Ranks. 


Total. 


1 


3 


4 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


4 


— 


4 


426 


500 


926 



C— WAR HONOURS. 





Former 
Pupils. 


Ex-Cadets 

of 

Cadet Corps. 


Ex-Cadets 

of 

O.T.C. 


Staff. 


Ladies. 


Total. 


Order of the Indian Empire, - 


1 


- 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Order of the British Empire, - 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


Distinguished Service Order, - 


3 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Bar to Military Cross, - 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Military Cross, .... 


29 


8 


5 


2 


- 


44 


Medal for Distinguished Conduct 
in the Field, - 


2 


1 


1 


— 


_ 


4 


Bar to Military Medal, - 


1 


— 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Military Medal, - 


9 


1 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Medal for Meritorious Service, 


1 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


The Royal Red Cross, - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Mentioned in Despatches, 


24 


6 


6 


2 


2 


40 


Foreign Decorations, 


8 


3 


- 


- 


- 


11 




85 


19 


12 


4 


5 


125 



D.— PRO PATRIA. 



Former Pupils of School, 
Ex-Cadets of Cadet Corps, 
Ex-Cadets of O.T.C, 
Staff, 



Officers. 


Other Ranks. 


Total. 


57 


72 


129 


17 


9 


26 


15 


6 


21 


1 


— 


1 



90 



87 



177 



ROLL OF SERVICE. 



Adam, Lockhart L., 
Agnew, Douglas C, 
Agnew, James, 

Aitken, Flockhart, M.C., 
Aitken, George J., M.A., 
Aitken, Maurice, 
Alexander, W. Fairlie, 

Allan, D. Maurice, M.A., B.A. 
Allan, Ramsay, 
Allan, W. N. C, 
Ancill, George C., 
Ancill, Sidney J., L.D.S., 
Anderson Gerald A. P., 
Anderson, J. Boyd, 
Anderson, Louis D., 
Anderson, Robert F., 

Anderson, Mungo P., 
Angus, Andrew G., 

Angus, David C., 
Armstrong, John L., 
Armstrong, K., M.M., 
Armstrong, L., 

Armstrong, Robert, M.B., 



Cadet-Sergeant, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Cadet, Glasgow University O.T.C. 

Lance-Corporal, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Lieut.-Colonel, Royal Field Artillery. 

Lieut.-Colonel, 21st Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Trumpeter, Royal Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 

Light Infantry. 
Chemical Warfare Service, United States Army. 
Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 
Lieutenant, The King's Own Scottish Borderers. 
Lieutenant, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 
Captain, General List. 
Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 
Captain, 7th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 
C.Q.M.S., 48th Batt. Canadian Highlanders. 
Sergeant, The Royal Fusiliers (City of London 

Regiment). 
Coy. Sergt.-Major, Royal Army Service Corps (M.T.) 

Private, 5th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers. 

Corporal, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Sergeant, 16th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Sergeant, Canadian Expeditionary Force. 

Corporal, 42nd Batt. Canadian Infantry (Royal High- 
landers of Canada). 

Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. 
14 



Roll of Service 



Armstrong, William, 

Arnot, Arthur A. M., M.C., 
Arnot, T. Cranstoun, 
Arroll, Richard H., 



Lieutenant, Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own 
(Yorkshire Regiment). 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Captain, Royal Air Force. 

Private, l/5th Batt. Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire 
Buffs, The Duke of Albany's). 



Baillie, Andrew S., 

Baillie, Harold M., 

Bain, Donald C, 

Bain, Frank H., 

Baird, Arthur W. F., 

Baird, James H. H., 

Baird, John R., 

Balfour, A. Campbell, M.C. ; 

Balfour, George J., 

Ballantyne, Archie, 
Bannatyne, Ian, 
Barbour, James C, 
Barrowman, Barclay, 
Beard, J. Reginald, 
Beard, William H. G., 
Beath, Kenneth, 
Beattie, Robert, 
Beattie, William, 
Bell, Algy, 
Berry, Douglas, M.A., 

Berstecher, Ernest F., 

Bisset, A. Grainger, M.C., 
M.B., 



B 



Sergeant, 1st (Res.) Garrison Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Corporal, 175th Coy. Machine Gun Corps. 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Second Lieutenant. 

Second Lieutenant, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Sergeant, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles. 

Captain, 18tb Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Private, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Engineer Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. 

Surgeon Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. 

Flight Cadet, Royal Air Force. 

Second Lieutenant, 13th Rajputs, Indian Army. 

Wireless Operator, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Wireless Telephony Instructor, Royal Air Force. 

Private, Royal Army Service Corps (M.T.) 

Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Acting Sergeant, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Trooper, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps, att. 1st Batt. The 
Royal Munster Fusiliers. 

15 



Hillhead High School 



Bjerre, Thomas E., 
Black, R. Chalmers, 
Blackie, Frank H., 

Blackwood, John L., 
Blair, Archibald, 

Blair, George G., D.C.M., 

Blair, George W., M.A., B.Sc. ; 
Blair, James W., M.A., 
Boag, Rev. J. Aitken, M.A., 

Bogue, Laurence M'L., C.A., 

Bone, J. Stanley, 

Booth, James A., 
Borland, John R., 

Borland, Victor J., 
Boyd, D. Adam, 
Boyle. Herbert M., 
Boyle, James A., 
Bowie, Allan S. H., 
Brander, A. G., 
Brown, Alexander, 
Brown, Archibald S., 
Brown, Arthur S., 

Brown, Charles T., 

Brown, George F., 
Brown, George F., M.M., 
Brown, George F. T., 



Captain, The Border Regiment. 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers (T.F.) 

Lieutenant, 8th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), 
att. The King's African Rifles. 

Trooper, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Captain, The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), att. 1st 
Assyrian Battalion, Mesopotamia. 

Corporal, 8th Batt. The Black Watch (Royal High- 
landers). 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Second Lieutenant, 3rd, att. 1st Batt. The Royal Scots 
Fusiliers. 

Lance-Corporal, 14th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Lance-Corporal, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders), att. Machine Gun Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, Labour 



Bombardier, Canadian Field Artillery — 2nd Canadian 
D.A.C. 

Lieutenant, 14th Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Private, 11th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery (S.R.) 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Cadet, Inns of Court Officers' Training Corps. 

Flight Cadet, Royal Air Force. 

Captain, 58th Batt. 2nd Central Ontario Regiment. 

Major, 9th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders), employed 2nd Garrison Batt. 
Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers). 

Second Lieutenant, Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Lance-Corporal, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 

Private, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

16 



Roll of Service 



Brown, Hugo S., 

Brown, J. D. Taylor, 

Brown, Harold R. S., 
Brown, Leslie H., 
Brown, W. Austin, 
Brown, William S., 
Bruce, Andrew M., 

Bruce, Charles J., 

Bruce, J. Wilson, 

Bruce, Norman S., M.C., M.B., 

Bryson, Eric R., 

Bryson, Robert E., M.C., 

Bryson, Robert W., 

Buchanan, W. S., 

Buist, John, 

Burgess, Matthew W., 
Burleigh, J. Bennett, 

Burleigh, J. C, 
Burnie, David J., 
Burnie, Roy M., 

Burt, John F. A., 
Butters, Fred. H. R., M.M., 



Lieutenant, 8th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers. 

Lieutenant, 6th, att. 16th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Private, 53rd (Y.S.) Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Captain, Alberta Regiment, Canada. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Second Lieutenant, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The 
Highland Light Infantry. 



Second Lieutenant, Army Cyclist 

Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps (S.R.) 

Lieutenant, Machine Gun Corps. 

Captain, Royal Air Force. 

Private, The London Regiment. 

Q.M.S., Scottish Horse. 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers). 

Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Private, 4th Batt. The Royal Fusiliers (City of London 
Regiment). 

Captain, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Private, 36th Infantry, United States Army. 

Lance-Corporal, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The 
Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 10 th Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Second Lieutenant, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 



Cairns, George R., M.A., Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery (T.F.) 

Cairns, William, Private, 78th Training Reserve Battalion. 

Calvert, G. Gareth, Private, 1st Batt. Seaforth Highlanders (Ro 

Buffs, The Duke of Albany's). 

B 17 



i-shire 



Hillhead High School 



Calvert, R. Munro, 
Cameron, Duncan M'G., 
Cameron, Herbert, 
Cameron, Wallace, 
Cameron, Waldo H., 

Cameron, William J. S., 
Cameron, William K., 

Cameron, W. W. L., 

Campbell, Alastair D., 
Campbell, Alexander M., 

Campbell, Alexander S., 

Campbell, Angus E., 
Campbell, Arthur W., 

Campbell, J., 
Campbell, J. A., 
Campbell, James C, 

Campbell, James W., 
Campbell, Frank L., 

Campbell, John, 

Campbell, Nathaniel, 

Campbell, Robert, 

Campbell, William, 

Campbell, W. A., M.B., 
F.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.(Lond.), 

Campbell, W. R., 

Campbell, W. S., 

Canadine, Rev. R. D., 

Cane, Albert, 



Signaller, 3rd Batt. The Gordon Highlanders. 
Cadet-Sergeant, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 
C.Q.M.S., 52nd Canadian Infantry Battalion. 
Private, 2/lst Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Second Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders. 

Lieutenant, 14th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 7th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers. 

Lieutenant, 8th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 
(Served with Indian Army). 

Cadet, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Lieutenant, 8th Batt. Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire 
Buffs, The Duke of Albany's). 

Private, 5th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers (Machine Gun Section). 

Lance- Corporal, Royal Engineers, Signal Service. 

Private, 14th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (London Scottish). 

Trooper, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Captain, 10th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers. 

Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Corporal, 12th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 

Private, Legion of Frontiersmen. 

Captain (A/Major), Royal Army Medical Corps (T.F.) 



Corporal, Army Cyclist Corps. 
Cadet, Royal Air Force. 

Chaplain, 4th Class, Army Chaplain's Department. 
Lieutenant. 
18 



Roll of Service 



Cappell, Robert S., M.M., 
Carpenter, John N., M.C., 

Carswell, Archibald, 

Carswell, J. A., 
Caughie, Charles B., 
Caunter, Arthur H., 
Cave, Albert W., M.C., 

Chalmers, F. M., 

Chalmers, John S., B.L., 

Chalmers, J. S., 

Chalmers, Peter, 
Chalmers, William A., 
Chisholm, John 0., 

Christison, Donald M., 

Christison, Robert C, B.Sc. 

Clark, G. Herbert, M.D. 
(Hons.), D.P.H., 

Clark, Marcus B., 

Clegg, James H., 
Clement, James W., 
Clementson, William, 
Clyde, Taylor, 
Cohen, Arthur M., 
Coltart, Alan T., M.C., 
Coltart, .lohn S., M.C., 
Comline, Edward, 
Connal, Andrew, M.D., 
Conn ell, Eric M., 



Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Second Lieutenant, 17th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Signaller, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Gunner, Royal Marine Artillery. 

Private, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Corporal, 3rd Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Lieutenant (A/Captain), 15th Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Lance-Corporal, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Major, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, 5th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lieutenant, 14th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian 
Regiment). 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Lieutenant, 10th Batt. The Gordon Highlanders. 

Major (General Staff), Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lieutenant (A/Captain), 1st Batt. Princess Louise's 
(Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Lieutenant, 4th Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Trooper, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Private, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, Transport Service. 

Lieutenant, 7th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Captain, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Trooper, 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys). 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lieutenant, Canadian Highlanders. 

19 



Hillhead High School 



Connelly, Edward, 
Cowan, C. C, 

Cowie, Daniel M'D., 
Cowie, James, 
Cowie, John, 

Cowie, William, 

Cowie, William, 

Cowie, William, 
Craig, J. Salisbury, M.B.. 
Craig, John W., 
Craig, William W., 
Craw, Robert M'D., 
Crawford, B. C, 
Crocker, John, 
Crombie, Alan, 

Crow, H., M.A., 
Crowe, David G., 

Crowe, Robert G. A., 
Cruickshank, A. Allan, 
Cruickshank, John C, 
Cruickshank, Fred., 
Cruickshank, Gordon, 
Cruickshank, Thomas H., 
Cubberley, Charles E., 
Cunningham, Alexander, 
Currie, Andrew, 
Currie, A. J., 
Currie, J. W., 



Cadet, Royal Air Force. 

Lieutenant, 14th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 
(Draft Conducting Officer.) 

Captain, 13th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Cadet, 11th Officer Cadet Battalion. 

Second Lieutenant, No. 1 Special Coy. (Mortar), Royal 
Engineers. 

Second Lieutenant, 13th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian 
Regiment). 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Driver, Scottish Red Cross. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Corporal, 2/lst Ayrshire Yeomanry. 

Second Lieutenant, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Corporal, Royal Field Artillery. 

Captain, Machine Gun Corps. 

Lieutenant, 3rd Batt. The Black Watch (Royal High- 
landers). 

Sergeant, Royal Army Veterinary Corps. 

Private, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, The 
Duke of Albany's). 

Lieutenant, The Gordon Highlanders. 

Lance-Corporal, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Guardsman, 1st Batt. Scots Guards. 

Private, 53rd (Y.S.) Batt, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 52nd (Y.S.) Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Private, 2nd Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Driver, Australian Field Artillery. 

Ordinary Seaman, Royal Navy. » 

Sergeant, 8th Batt. The Prince of Wales's Volunteers 
(South Lancashire Regiment). 

20 



Roll of Service 



Davidson, Farquhar B., 

Davidson, James P., 
Davidson, Robert R., 
Davies, Jack V. M., 

Dawson, Coningsby, 

Dawson, G. S., 

Denholm, Alexander H., 

Denovan, James, 

Dewar, J., 

Dick, John, 

Dickson, George, 

Dickson, J. Hamilton, L.D.S. 

Dickson, J. R., 

Dickson, Mark, 
Dickson, Peter C, 
Dingwall, Andrew, 
Dodds, James A., 
Donald, James M., 
Donald, John R. H., 
Donald, Thomas M., 

Dougan, John M., 
Douglas, Arthur M., 

Douglas, William G., M.C., 
Drinnan, James M., 



Second Lieutenant, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, Tank Corps. 

Cadet, Glasgow University O.T.C. 

Second Lieutenant, 4th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Lieutenant, Canadian Field Artillery. (Seconded for 
Imperial Service.) 

Lance Corporal, 72nd Canadian Infantry Batt. (Seaforth 
Highlanders of Canada). British Columbia Regiment. 

Private, 9th (Highlanders) Batt. The Royal Scots 
(Lothian Regiment). 

Corporal, l/3rd Lowland Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. 

Gunner, Royal Field Artillery. 

Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Sapper, Royal Engineers. 

Second Lieutenant, 3rd, att. 1st Batt. The Queen's Own 
Cameron Highlanders. 

Captain, 7th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 
Assistant Embarkation Staff Officer (Class F.F.) 

Gunner, Royal Navy. 

Lieutenant, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Lieutenant, 13th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. The Royal Sussex Regiment. 

Signaller, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Corporal, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain, 5th Batt. The Prince of Wales's Volunteers 
(South Lancashire Regiment). 



ueen's Own Royal Glasgow 
2nd Batt. The Cameronians 



Squadron Sergeant-Major, 
Yeomanry. 

Lieutenant, 3rd, att. 
(Scottish Rifles). 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

21 



Hillhead High School 



Dron, John K., 

Dron, William, 

Drummond, David, 

Drummond, D. C. G., 
Drummond, W. B., 
Drysdale, A. 0., 

Drysdale, Livingstone, 
Duffus, Gordon C, 

Duncan, Daniel, 

Duncan, John P., 
Dunlop, A., 
Dunlop, Hugh S. A., 
Dunlop, James, 
Dunlop, James E., 
Dunlop, M., 
Dunlop, Matthew A., 

Dunlop, Matthew S., 
Dunlop, Robert, 

Dunn, David T., 

Dunn, James, A.M.I.C.E.. 

Dunn, T. J., 
Dunn, Thomas S., 
Dykes, Roy D., 



Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry, 
att. 1st Batt. The King's Own Scottish Borderers. 

Captain and Quartermaster, 9th (Glasgow Highland) 
Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, The 
Duke of Albany's). 

Trooper, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Sapper, 1st Field Company, Australian Engineers. 

Lieutenant, 10th Batt. The Black Watch (Royal High- 
landers). 

Lieutenant, General List, South African Forces. 

Lance-Corporal, 78th Canadian Infantry Batt. (Winnipeg 
Grenadiers). Manitoba Regiment. 

Lieutenant, 7th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Third Air Mechanic, Royal Air Force. 

Corporal, Royal Engineers. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Private, 3rd Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Pioneer, Royal Engineers (Signal Service). 

Private, 3rd Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Second Lieutenant, 4th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Private, 11th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Private, 14th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (London Scottish). 

Captain, 8th Gurkha Rifles, Indian Army. 

Captain, 2nd Batt. Queen Victoria's Own Sappers and 
Miners, Indian Army. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Cadet, Royal Air Force. 



Emslie, C. G., M.M., 



Corporal, Canadian Engineers. 



Roll of Service 



Emslie, John W., M.M., Sergeant, 31st Canadian Infantry Battalion. Alberta 

Regiment. 

Emslie, W. J., Lieutenant, 49th Canadian Infantry Battalion. Alberta 

Regiment. 

Erskine, Thomas G., Second Lieutenant, 5th, att. 2nd Batt. The Royal Scots 

Fusiliers. 

Evans, Alec J., Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 



Faichney, John, M.A., B.Sc, 

Fairlie, William H., 
Fergus, A. D., 
Fergus, R. B., 
Ferguson, Hugh, M.C., 
Ferguson, James, 
Ferguson, James W., 
Ferguson, Thomas M'D., 
Ferrier, James G., 
Ferrier, L., 
Field, George F., 
Field, James N. S., 
Findlay, A. G. S., 
Findlay, David, 
Findlay, Douglas EL, 
Findlay, Robert E., 

Findlay, T. Hamilton, 
Finlayson, Alexander L., 
Fisher, David K., 
Fisher, T. Clement, 

Fleck, Daniel L. M'P., 
Fleming, Gerard R, 



Lieutenant and Quartermaster, 16th Batt. The High 
land Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 6 th Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Sapper, Royal Engineers. 

Private, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers (Signal Service). 

Lance-Corporal, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Lieutenant, Machine Gun Corps. 

Private, 1st Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Captain, Machine Gun Corps. 

Private, Royal Marine Engineers. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Cadet, Royal Air Force. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers (Signal Service). 

Private, 2nd Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders). 

Driver, Royal Field Artillery. 

Gunner, Royal Field Artillery. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, The Royal Scots Fusiliers, att. 
Royal Air Force. 

Private, 44th Canadian Infantry Battalion. 

Captain, 74th Punjabis, Indian Army. 

23 



Hillhead High School 



Fleming, H. Calderwood, 

Flint, Andrew F., M.C., 
Forrest, William, 

Forrester, Walter A., 
Forrester, William A., 
Forsyth, Alfred J., 
Forsyth, Charles R., 

Forsyth, George F., 

Forsyth, J. Willison, 
Foulds, William H., 
Frame, A. Car, D.S.O., 

Freer, Walter, 
Friend, Samuel, C.A., 



Lieutenant, 5th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Lieutenant (A/Captain), Royal Field Artillery. 

Sergeant, 1st Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers. 

Bombardier, Royal Field Artillery. 

Sergeant, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 
and 2nd Batt. Machine Gun Corps. 

Lieutenant, 4th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian 
Regiment) (Queen's Edinburgh Rifles). 

Captain, 6th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Air Mechanic, Royal Air Force. 

Captain, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry, att. Egyptian Army. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 



Gartly, William H. A., 

Gemmell, Charles 
Gemmell, Joseph G., 
Geyer, Adolph R, M.B., 
Geyer, Ernest W., M.M. 
Gibb, Alexander N., 
Gilmore, Thomas H., 
Glen, Alexander, 

Glen, A. Graham, 
Goode, Richard J. E. P.. 

Gordon, Eric A., 

Gordon, Thomas, 



Lieutenant, 4th Batt. Alexandra, Princess of Wales's 
Own (Yorkshire Regiment). 

Second Lieutenant, The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Private, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. 

Sergeant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Corporal, 1st (Royal) Dragoons. 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. The Royal Dublin Fusiliers and 
Royal Flying Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, 3rd Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps (Dental Staff). 

24 



Roll of Service 



Gossman, T. M'V., 

Graham, Charles E., 

Graham, Cosmo P. B., 
Graham, Harry J., 

Granger, Andrew P., M.B., 
D.P.H., 

Grant, Alexander J., 

Grant, Ronald T., M.B., 

Gray, Robert A., 

Greig, Harry L., 

Greig, Pat., 
Grieve, John E., 
Grieve, Weir 

Guthrie, Fred C, 

Guthrie, Hamish C, 
Guthrie, R. G., 



Lance-Corporal, 6th Batt. The Black Watch (Royal 
Highlanders). 

Lieutenant, 9th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Private, Royal Army Service Corps (M.T.) 

Lance-Corporal, 9th Batt. The Black Watch (Royal 
Highlanders). 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps, att. 7 th Batt. 
The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 7th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

A.B., Royal Navy. 

Second Lieutenant, 4th Batt. ■ The East Yorkshire 
Regiment. 

Major, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Trooper, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Captain, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. Served with Army Cyclist Corps. 

Lieutenant, 37th Lancers (Baluch Horse), Indian 
Army. 

Captain, 3rd Batt. The East Yorkshire Regiment. 

Sergeant, Royal Army Service Corps. 



H 



Hair, William M. C, 
Haldane, John R., 
Haldane, Robert H. B., 

Haldane, William R., 

Hall, David S., M.C., 

Halley, Francis W., 

Halley, James M. W., M.C., 
F.R.I.B.A., 



Rifleman, 2nd Batt. 3rd New Zealand Rifle Brigade. 

Captain, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Major, 6th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders). 



Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. Princess Louise's 
Sutherland Highlanders). 



(Argyll and 



Captain, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders) and Royal Flying Corps. 

Lieutenant, Inland Water Transport, R.E. 

Major, Royal Engineers. 



25 



Hillhead High School 



Halley, J. Harold, 

Halley, Mat W., 
Halliday, James, 
Halliday, J., 
Hamilton, David, 
Hamilton, Robert T., 
Hamilton, William S., 
Hammond, Gerald, 

Handyside, James B., 

Hanna, Arthur L., M.B.E., 
Hannah, G., 
Hannah, John, 
Harbinson, William G., 
Hardie, Archibald, 

Harley, George M., 
Harley, William H. B., 

Harper, Alexander, 

Harper, James, M.A., M.B., 

Harper, John A., M.C., M.A. 
M.B., 

Harris, Ernest, 
Harris, Montague, 
Harrison, John, 
Hart, Archie M., 
Hart, James, 
Harvey, Roy D., 



Sergeant, 2/ 14th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (London Scottish). 

Lieutenant, Indian Army. 

Private, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. 

Private, Canadian Engineers. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Cadet Lance-Corporal, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Captain. 5th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders). 

Major, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, The King's Own Scottish Borderers. 

Private, Royal Army Service Corps (M.T.) 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt, The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Captain, 1 2th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, The Black Watch (Royal High- 
landers). 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 
Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps. 
Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 



Lieutenant, 38th Batt. The Royal Fusiliers (City of 
London Regiment). 

Corporal (A/Sergeant), 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. 
The Highland Light Infantry. 

Major, 4th Lowland (Howitzer) Brigade, Royal Field 
Artillery. 

Private, 9 th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Private, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 



Roll of Service 



Harvey, James G., 

Haugh D. Harvey, M.C., 

Haugh, J. W. Norris, 
Hay, George R., 

Hayward, A. Gordon, 

Hayward, John H., 



Second Lieutenant, 3rd Batt. The Queen's Own 
Cameron Highlanders. 

Major, 4th Batt. Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, 
The Duke of Albany's), att. Machine Gun Corps. 

Lieutenant, The Cameronians (Scottish 



Hempseed, John D., 
Henderson, Archibald, 
Henderson, George, 
Henderson, H. Riach, 

Henderson, J. Muirhead, 
Henderson, John, 

Henderson, John H., 

Henderson, Thomas M., 
Henderson, Walter, 
Henry, John, 
Henry, Robert W., 

Hepburn, Charles A., 
Hepburn, George, 
Hepburn, J. Oliver, 
Herbert, Robert B., 
Herbertson, James D., 
Hill, Arthur H, M.C., 

Hill, John, M.A., LL.B., 

Hill, John, M.B., 



Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Private, 12th Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Corporal, 2/3rd Scottish Horse. 

Sergeant, Royal Air Force. 

Lieutenant, The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Private, l/4th Batt. The King's Own Scottish Borderers. 

Farrier-Sergeant, 2nd Surmah Valley Light Horse, 
Indian Defence Force. 

Lance-Corporal, The King's Own Scottish Borderers. 

Private, 72nd Canadian Infantry Batt. (Seaforth High- 
landers of Canada). British Columbia Regiment. 

Lieutenant, 2/1 9th (County of London) Batt. The 
London Regiment (St. Pancras). 

Private, The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Lieutenant, 17 th Cavalry, Indian Army. 

Lieutenant, Army Cyclist Corps. 

C.Q.M.S., 16th Canadian Infantry Battalion (The 
Canadian Scottish). Manitoba Regiment. 

Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery and Special List. 

Private, 79th Cameron Highlanders of Canada. 

Corporal, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Captain, 15th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. 

Captain (A/Major), 4th Highland (Mountain) Brigade, 
Royal Garrison Artillery (T.F.) 

Corporal, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Private, 6th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers. 

27 



Hillhead High School 



Hill, J., 
Hislop, A. G., 
Hogg, G, 
Hogg, D., 
Hood, Frank B., 
Hood, John W., 

Hopkin, H. Loudon, 

Horn, Charles, L.D., 
Horn, John C, 
Home, James, 
Houston, Alexander G., 

Houston, Edward M'D. S., 
C.A., 

Houston, Leslie, 

Houston, S. Erik, M.A., C.A. ; 
Howells, R. Edwin, 
Hunter, David G., 
Hunter, J. F., 

Hutchison, Peter, M.B., 

Hutton, William, M.M., 
Hymans, Harold. 



Private, 5th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Driver, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Private, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Corporal, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Air Mechanic, Royal Naval Air Service. 

Lieutenant, 4th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regi- 
ment) (Queen's Edinburgh Rifles). 

Lieutenant, 8th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Corporal, Royal Field Artillery. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Captain, Canadian Army Service Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. The Northumberland 
Fusiliers. 

Lieutenant, 7/8th Batt. The King's Own Scottish 
Borderers. 

Second Lieutenant, 4th Batt. The King's Own Scottish 
Borderers. 

Private, The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Sergeant, 2/1 st Lanarkshire Yeomanry. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Surgeon Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer 
Reserve. 

Corporal, Australian Field Artillery. 

Cadet, Royal Air Force. 



Inglis, Robert A., Lance-Corporal, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Ingram, Archibald G., Private, 3rd Batt. The King's Own Scottish Borderers. 

Ingram, Alexander R., Corporal, 14th (County of London) Batt. The London 

Regiment (London Scottish). 

Ingram, Harry I., Trooper, 7th (Queen's Own) Hussars. 

Ingram, J. B., Second Lieutenant, Labour Corps. 

28 



Roll of Service 



Jack, Harry, 
James, John C. A., 
John, Robert, 
Johnston, Alexander R., 

Johnston, Frederick L., 

Johnston, Hugh A., 
Johnstone, Burns L., 
Jordan, James W., M.A., 

Jordan, Harold W., M.C. 



J 

Private, 12th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Corporal, Honourable Artillery Company. 

Private, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Captain, 3rd Batt. The Highland Light Infantry and 
Royal Air Force. 

Lieutenant, 1st Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian 
Regiment). 

Sergeant, 3/6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Air Mechanic, Royal Air Force. 

Lieutenant, Unattached List (T.F.), Hillhead High 
School O.T.C. 

Second Lieutenant, 19th Batt. The Durham Light 
Infantry. 



Kay, David, 
Kay, Robert G., M.M., 
Kelly, Robert C, 
Kelt, John S., 
Kennedy, Arthur A., 
Kennedy, James G., 

Kennedy, Robert J., 
Kenney, Edgar V., 
Kenney, Percy, 
Kerr, Robert C, 

Kilpatrick, D. Ross, M.D. 
Kirkland, Andrew, 
Kirkwood, Arthur, 



K 

Driver, Royal Field Artillery. 

Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Sergeant, Labour Corps. 

Private, 56th Training Reserve Battalion. 

Private, 16th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Private, 79th Cameron Highlanders of Canada. 

Sergeant, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 



Lance-Corporal, 4th Batt. The King's Own 
Borderers. 

Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lance-Corporal, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 



Scottish 



Lacaille, A. D., 
Laing, R., 



Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 
Private, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 
29 



Hillhead High School 



Laing, Robert B. S., Private, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Laing, Hubert, Private, 5th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Laird, James A., Lance- Corporal, 4th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Laird, James M., M.C., Major, Royal Field Artillery. 

Laird, James M., Sergeant, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Laird, John, Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Lambie, John F. % M.B., Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lamont, Donald R. F., Sergeant, 1st Batt. The Gordon Highlanders. 

Lamont, Hugh C, Private, The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Lang, Archibald, Sergeant, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lang, John, M.B., Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lang, John, Lance-Corporal, 13th Batt. The Duke of Cambridge's 

Own (Middlesex Regiment). 

Lang, Robert N., Private, Machine Gun Corps. 

Langlands, Eric W., Captain, Indian Army. 

Langlands, Ralph I., Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Langlands, William G., Second Lieutenant, 5th Batt. The Highland Light 

Infantry. 

Langley, A. A. S., Private, 3rd Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Langmuir, James R., Flight Cadet, Royal Air Force. 

Lapraik, Thomas, Staff Signaller, Royal Highlanders of Canada. Quebec 

Regiment. 

Last, Frank H., Cadet, Royal Air Force. 

Law, Alex. F., Medical Department, United States Army. 

Lemkes, Douglas R. A., Private, The Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex 

Regiment). 

Lennie, J., Lance-Corporal, Royal Engineers. 

Lever, Abie, Private, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Lever, David, Corporal, Royal Engineers. 

Levy Leon E Private, 5th, att. 9th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 

Rifles). 

Liddell, James A, Captain, 11th Hariana Lancers, Indian Army. 

Liddell, William T., Major, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Liddell, Robert G. W., Private, The King's Own Scottish Borderers. 

30 



Roll of Service 



Lightbody, John H., 
Lindsay, Stuart, 
Little, James C, 

Logan, John, 
Logan, John F., 
Logan, William J., 
Logan, William D., C.A., 

Logie, Colin C. C, 

Lorimer, E. Glen, 

Lothian, Norman V., M.C., 
B.Sc, M.B., D.P.H., 

Loudon, Hamish H., 

Loudon, Walter J., 

Low, G. L., 
Low, J. G., 

Low, Lindsay, 
Low, Robert W., 
Lowden, David L., 
Lyle, G. } 



Trooper, Lanarkshire Yeomanry. 

Lieutenant, Eoyal Air Force. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Second Lieutenant, 1st Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Chief Petty Officer, Royal Navy. 

Lieutenant, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 
and Royal Army Pay Department. 

Second Lieutenant, 8th Batt. The Cameronians 
(Scottish Rifles). Served under Air Ministry. 

Lance Corporal, 15th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lieutenant, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, The Black Watch (Royal High- 
landers). 

Private, 11th Batt. The Welsh Regiment. 

Lance-Corporal, 4th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian 
Regiment) (Queen's Edinburgh Rifles). 

Private, 1st Batt. The Welsh Regiment. 

Corporal, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Midshipman, Transport Service. 

Captain, Royal Engineers. 



MC 



McAllister, J. Steel, 
McAllister, William, 
Macartney, Duncan, 
Macartney George H. 

Macaulay, Lindsay A., 
MacBeth, G., 

McBeth, Jack, 



Private, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 15th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Air Mechanic, Royal Air Force. 

Second Lieutenant, The King's Own (Royal Lancaster 
Regiment). 

Private, 6th Batt. The King's Own Scottish Borderers. 

Lieutenant, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The High- 
land Light Infantry. 

Private, 12th Manitoban Dragoons, Canada. 

31 



Hillhead High School 



McBeth, Leslie, 

Macbrayne, George D., 
McCallum, D., 
MacCalman, John M., 
McClure, Alexander, 
McCormack, Daniel G., 
McCracken, Peter A. E., 
MacDermid, George A., 

Macdonald, A. T. Inglis, 
M.D., D.P.H, 

Macdonald, Rev. C. Gordon, 
M.A., 

Macdonald, Colin M., M.A., 
D.Litt., 

Macdonald, Edward E., 

MacDonald, Hugh F., 

Macdonald, J. R., 
Macdonald, Robert, 
MacDougall, Archibald, 
McDougall, Donald D., 

Macdougall, Duncan, 
McDougall, John, 
MacDougall, John A., 

MacDougall, J. A., 
Macdougall, John W., 

MacDougall, Stewart D., 
McElwain, James, F.R.G.S., 

McEwan, George C, 
McFarlane, Daniel, 



Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Driver, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Cadet Sergeant, Glasgow University O.T.C. 

Private, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Cadet Sergeant, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Lieutenant, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers). 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 



Second Lieutenant, Unattached List (T.F.), Hillhead 
High School O.T.C. 

Lieutenant, Canadian Army Sei'vice Corps. 

Lance-Corporal, 4th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders. 

Private, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Midshipman, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Captain, 8th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers). 

C.Q.M.S., Royal Engineers. 

Private, 16th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lance-Corporal, 17th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Private, Canadian Army Service Corps. 

Private, 1/1 4th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (London Scottish). 

Signalman, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. 

Major, 16th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry, now 
Major, Army Educational Corps. 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Bombardier, Honourable Artillery Company. 

32 



Roll of Service 



Macfarlane, Hugh S., 
McFarlane, J. A., 
Macfarlane, William, 

Macfeat, Cecil, 

Macfeat, Douglas, 
Macfeat, Frederick, 
Macfeat, Wallace, 

McGavin, Nathan, M.C., 
McGavin, William B., 

McGaw, William R., 
McGeorge, Walter, 

MacGil christ, William A., 
Mcllroy, Robert D., M.A., 

Mclnnes, A., 
Maclnnes, Finlay D., 

Maclnnes, John F., 

Mclnnes, M. E., 
Mcintosh, John, 
Mclntyre, Duncan, 
Mclntyre, Peter, 

Mclntyre, Robert D., 

Mclntyre, William J., 

Mackay, R. Lindsay, M.C., 

MacKellar, Ian N. C, 
Mackenzie, Colin A., 
c 



Lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Gunner, Royal Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant, 5th, att. 1st Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Private, l/6th Batt. The Black Watch (Royal High- 
landers. 

Lieutenant, 16th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lance-Corporal, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 1st Batt. The Royal Irish Rifles. 

Lance-Corporal, 1/1 7th (County of London) Batt. The 
London Regiment (Poplar and Stepney Rifles). 

Guardsman, Coldstream Guards. 

Second Lieutenant, 6th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Lance-Corporal, The Gordon Highlanders. 

Lieutenant (A/Captain), 5th Batt. Princess Louise's 
(Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Corporal, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 31st Canadian Infantry Battalion. Alberta 
Regiment. 

Private, 28th Canadian Infantry Battalion. Saskat- 
chewan Regiment. 

Corporal, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Driver, Canadian Field Artillery. 

Private, 2nd Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Lance-Corporal, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The 
Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 2nd Batt. Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire 
Buffs, The Duke of Albany's). 

Lieutenant, 11th, att. l/8th Batt. Princess Louise's 
(Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Lieutenant, General List. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

33 



Hillhead High School 



Mackenzie, D., 

Mackenzie, Frank R., 

McKenzie, R. C, 
Mackenzie, Robert C, 
Mackenzie, T. D., 
Mackerracher, G., 
Mackie, T. Adair, 

MacKim, Alec P., 
MacKim, Thomas B., 
Mackinlay, Alec W., 

Mackinlay, George A. C., M.A., 
Mackinlay, John W., M.C., 
McKinlay, Robert G., 

MacKinnon, Alister J. B., 

MacKinnon, Donald J., M.B., 
MacKinnon, William A. G., 

McKinnon, Malcolm, 
McLachlan, Alexander, 

McLagan, James, B.Sc, 
Maclagan, Thomas D. 0., M.C.. 

Maclagan, Thomas J., 

Maclaine, Gillaine D., 
MacLaren, Ronald G. A., 
MacLaren, Walter de B., 
McLaren, Watt, 
Maclean, Alex. M., 



Second Lieutenant, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire 
Buffs, The Duke of Albany's). 

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. Seaforth Highlanders 
(Ross-shire Buffs, The Duke of Albany's). 

Lance-Corporal, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Private, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Corporal, Royal Engineers. 

Signalman, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. 

Second Lieutenant, 1st Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Corporal Mechanic, Royal Air Force. 

Private, The King's (Liverpool Regiment). 

Second Lieutenant, 17th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Private, 2nd Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 

Major, 9th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 



Second Lieutenant, 10th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Private, 9th (Highlanders) Batt. The Royal Scots 
(Lothian Regiment). 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, 3rd Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian 
Regiment). 

Bombardier, Royal Field Artillery. 

Private, 8th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders). 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Captain, 14th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (London Scottish). 

Sergeant, 14th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (London Scottish). 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lance-Corporal, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain, 2/26th Punjabis, Indian Army. 

Corporal, 2/3rd County of London Yeomanry. 

Captain, Royal Air Force. 

34 



Roll of Service 



MacLean, Donald, 

Maclean, James A., M.A., 

Maclean, Magnus N., 
MacLean, William A., M.A, 

MacLean, William F., 
Maclean, William T., 

McLellan, William, 
McLeod, James D., 
Macleod, J. Muat, 
MacLeod, Norman, M.A., 

Macmillan, Alexander, 
McMillan, Archibald L., 
McMillan, Ernest, 
McMillan, Frederick W., M.B., 
MacMillan, R. F., 

McMinn, William, M.C., M.A. 
McMutrie, Robert L., 
McNab, James, 
McNab, John W., 
McNab, William L., 
Macnair, James M., 
McNeil, J. F., 
McNeil, Robert W., 
McNeil, William, 
McNeill, Patrick K., 
McNeill, W. A, 
McNicol, John, 

MacNiven, Angus, 



Second Lieutenant, 1st Batt. The Cameron ians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Major, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, 1st Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Cadet, Royal Air Force. 

Lieutenant (A/Captain), The Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders. 

Private, 4th Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Lance-Corporal, 3rd Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Engineer Lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Captain, 4th Batt. Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire 
Buffs, The Duke of Albany's) att. l/8th Princess 
Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Sergeant, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, Australian Army Service Corps. 

Private, The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Private, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, The 
Duke of Albany's). 

Lieutenant, The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Lieutenant (A/Captain), The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Private, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Private, 2nd Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Corporal, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Trooper, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Lieutenant (A/Captain), 6th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Cadet, Glasgow University O.T.C. 

35 



Hillhead High School 



Macphail, Eric J., 
Macphail, James W., 

McPhee, Robert, 

McPherson, Duncan C. McE., 
McQueen, James M., 



Lieutenant, 8th Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Second Lieutenant, 8th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Private, 14th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (London Scottish). 

Cadet Sergeant, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Lieutenant, 7th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 



M 



Magee, Andrew V., 

Magee, Cuthbert G., F.R.C.P. 
(Edin.), 

Maitland, Alexander McL., 



Maitland, John H., 
Marsh, Douglas W., 

Marshall, Andrew F., 
Marshall, Allan G., 
Marshall, James, 
Marshall, John, M.C., M.B. ; 
Marshall, Jordan H., 
Martin, A. Wellesley, 

Martin, C. Kingsley, 

Martin, Thomas, 
Martin, W Stanley, 

Mather, Frederick T., 
Mechan, Arthur C, 

Mechan, Harold R., 
Mechan, Henry, 



Private, Inns of Court O.T.C. 
Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Wireless Operator, Transport Service. 

Lance-Corporal, 52nd (Grad.) Batt. The Gordon High- 
landers. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Captain, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Midshipman, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Lieutenant, 5th, att. 18th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Captain, 9th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders), and Royal Air Force. 

C.Q.M.S., Royal Army Service Corps (M.T.) 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry, att. 1st Garrison Batt. The Royal 
Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Private, 16th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Lance-Corporal, 5th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders. 

Flight Commander, Royal Air Force. 

Lieutenant, 15th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

36 



Roll of Service 



Mellish, Charles M., 
Hellish, Ian G., 
Mellish, James H., 
Menary, George, M.C., M.A., 
Metcalfe, William, 

Michael, James W., 
Michael, Thomas G., 
Middleton, G. F., 
Middleton, John C., 
Middleton, William M., 
Millar, Archd. U., M.C., M.B. 

Millar, Jack, 
Millar, William W. C, 
Miller, Archibald, 
Miller, Donald, 
Miller, George, 
Miller, Harold L., 
Miller, James A., 
Miller, John W., 
Miller, Robert G., 

Miller, Thomas H. A., 
Miller, W. Burnet D., 

Milligan, James, 
Milliken, J., M.C., 
Moir, J. M., M.A., 

Mollison, Dan M., 
Mollison, Jack, 
Mollison, W. Allan, 

Montgomerie, D. M., 



Sergeant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Private, l/7th Batt. The Gordon Highlanders. 

Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Captain, 10th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers). 

Q.M.S., Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Sergeant, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Sapper, Royal Engineers. 

Corporal, Royal Engineers. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps, att. l/5th Batt. 
The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment). 

Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 

Midshipman, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Corporal, Royal Engineers. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Engineer Artificer, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery (Siege). 

Lance-Corporal, The Royal Fusiliers (City of London 
Regiment). 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Second Lieutenant, Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Driver, Royal Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant, Tank Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, 1st Batt. The Black Watch (Royal 
Highlanders). 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Lieutenant, 2/6th Batt. The Duke of Wellington's 
(West Riding Regiment), att. Machine Gun Corps. 

Private, Malay States Volunteer Rifles. 

37 



Hillhead High School 



Montgomerie, J. Love, 
Montgomerie, William M., 
Montgomery, James A., 

Morland, Andrew A., 
Morland, William, 

Morris, Geoi-ge H., 
Morrison, Frank R., 

Morrison, John B., 

Morrison, John H. G., 
Morrison, J. Iain, 
Morrison, J. Stewart, 

Morrison, Robert W., 

Morrison, William, 
Morton, Alfred E., 

Morton, H. Newton, M.C., 
Morton, George, M.C., 
Morton, J. T. Kingston, 
Mottram, Frederick, 
Mottram, Sydney C., 
Mottram, Thomas W., M.C., 

Muir, Harry S., M.C., 

Muir, James, 

Muirhead, Ronald H., 
Muirhead, Waldo H., 
Munro, John C. C, 
Murchie, Alexander, 



Lieutenant, Singapore Volunteer Rifles. 

Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Cadet Corporal and Sergeant Piper, Hillhead High 
School O.T.C. 

Flight Cadet, Royal Air Force. 

Second Lieutenant, 17th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry, att. 97th Trench Mortar Battery. 

Lieutenant, Royal Navy. 

Sergeant, 7th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers. 

Captain, 19th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (St. Pancras). 

Engine-room Artificer, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. 

Lieutenant, The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. The Cameronians 
(Scottish Rifles). 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Private, 6th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers. 

Captain, Tank Corps. 

Lieutenant, Machine Gun Corps. 

Private, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain, Royal Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant, Tank Corps. 

Captain, 5th Batt. The King's Own (Yorkshire Light 
Infantry). 

Captain, 9th Batt. The Black Watch (Royal High- 
landers. 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Captain, Royal Air Force (Kite Balloon Section). 

Captain, Royal Engineers. 

Captain, The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and 
Derbyshire Regiment). 

38 



Roll of Service 



Murray, Alexander H., 
Murray, David, D.C.M., 
Murray, James, 
Murray, John, B.Sc, 
Murray, Eobert H., 

Murray, Ronald G., 

Murray, Thomas J., 

Murray, T. Wilson, M.C., 
Murray, William H., M.I.M.E.. 



Staff-Sergeant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant, Canadian Field Artillery. 

Gunner, Royal Field Artillery. 

Engineer Lieutenant, Royal Navy. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps (T.F.), 2nd London 
Sanitary Company. 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps (T.F.), 2nd London 
Sanitary Company. 

Major, Royal Field Artillery. 

Sapper, Royal Engineers (Special Company Civil 
Engineers, att. 1st Field Company Divisional 
Engineers, Royal Naval Division). 



N 



Nance, Jack, 

Nance, Thomas M., 
De Nance, Wilfred C, 

Napier, Rev. Robert H., B.D., 

Neilson, John T., 

Nelson, Alexander, 
Nelson, George, 

Nicol, Donald F., 
Nicol, G, 

Nicolson, James, 
Nimmo, Charles B., 

Nimmo, Stuart H., 



Lance-Corporal, 5th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders. 

Private, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Lance-Corporal, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Lieutenant, 4/1 st King's African Rifles and Intelligence 
Officer, Nyasaland Field Force. 

Second Lieutenant, 8th Batt. The Cameronians 
(Scottish Rifles). 

Sapper, Royal Engineers (Sound Ranging Section). 

Lance-Corporal, The King's Own (Yorkshire Light 
Infantry). 

Captain, Tank Corps. 

Private, 10th Batt. The King's (Liverpool Regiment), 
(Liverpool Scottish). 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Sergeant, 51st Batt. The Bedfordshire and Hertford- 
shire Regiment. 

Captain, 9th Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

39 



Hillhead High School 



Orr, Frank G., C.B.E., Captain (Brevet-Major), Royal Field Artillery and 

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Birmingham Anti- 
Aircraft Defences. 

Orr, John H., Cadet Sergeant, Glasgow University O.T.C. 

Osbourne, Charles H., Lieutenant, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The High- 

land Light Infantry. 

Osbourne, Robert, Captain, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 

Light Infantry. 



Parker, James R., 

Parker, William A., D.S.O., 

Paterson, Jack, C.A., 

Paterson, William A., 

Paton, Harry R., 

Paton, James, 

Fatterson, Robert D., 

Pattie, James W., 

Paul, J. H., M.A., B.Sc, M.B., 

Pearlman, Joseph, 

Peden, William W., 

Penman, Henry G., 
Petersen, Olaf C. W., 

Phemister, James, M.A., B.Sc. 
Philip, Thomas S., 
Phillips, Philip E., 
Phillips, William, 

Picken, Shaw S., 



Sergeant, 17th Batt, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain, 5th, att. 9th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Private, 2nd Batt. Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire 
Buffs, The Duke of Albany's). 

Second Lieutenant, 1st Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Private, 18th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Naval Aviation Department, United States Navy. 

Second Lieutenant, Labour Corps. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, Tank Corps. 

Lance-Corporal, 2/5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Sergeant, Canadian Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant, 9th (Glasgow Highland), att. 16th Batt. 
The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers (Sound Ranging Section). 

Lance-Corporal, Royal Engineers (Meteorological 
Section). 

Private, Machine Gun Corps. 

40 



Roll of Service 



Pickering, Joseph L. K. 
Pickering, Robert Y., 

Pillans, George L., M.C., 
Place, J. Douglas, 

Plage, J., 

Pollock, Archibald B., 

Pollock, Arthur C, 

Pollock, Charles A., 

Purdie, Robert W., 



, Sapper, Australian Engineers. 

Lance-Corporal, 17th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry, att. 4th Army Infantry School of Instruc- 
tion. 

M.B., Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, The Duke of Cambridge's Own 
(Middlesex Regiment). Employed with Ministry of 
Labour. 

Chief Officer, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Sergeant-Major, Calcutta Scottish, Indian Defence 
Force. 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry, 
att. The Dorsetshire Regiment. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 



Rae, John, 

Rae, Robert, 

Rae, R. L., 

Rae, S. C, 

Ralston, Alexander A., 

Ralston, Charles M., 

Ralston, James, M.A., 
Ralston, Wm. Jack, 

Rankin, James, 

Reed, T. Harold, 

Reid, Hugh, 

Reid, Walter S., 

Reid, W. Harley, 

Reith, Stephen D., D.C.M. 
B.Sc, 



Veterinary Department, Scottish Horse. 

Trooper, Scottish Horse. 

Sergeant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Private, The King's (Liverpool Regiment). 

Lance-Corporal, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 



Rifleman, New Zealand Rifle Brigade (Earl of Liver- 
pool's Own). 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Lance Corporal, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Corporal, l/8th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Trooper, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Corporal, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Lieutenant, 10th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 16th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, Indian Army Reserve of Officers, att. 
2/42nd Deoli Regiment. 

41 



Hillhead High School 



Renison, D'Esterre, 
Ribbeck, Ernest H., 
Rice, Charles M., M.A., 
Richard, Frederick L., M.B., 

Richards, Harry M., 

Richmond, J. A. Hope, 

Rimmer, John L., 
Ritchie, John, 
Robb, John, M.A., 
Robertson, Alexander, 
Robertson, Charles, 

Robertson, Charles M., M.C., 

Robertson, D., 

Robertson, John, 

Robertson, John M., 

Robertson, Leonard A., 

Robertson, Mowbray, 

Robertson, Richard D., M.A., 
B.Sc, 

Robertson, William J., 

Robinson, Fred B , 

Robinson, T. Eaton, 

Robinson, William E., 

Roddick, David, 

Roddick, James M., 

Roddick, Robert J., 

Roddis, Louis G., 

Rodger, William, B.Sc, 



Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Private, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps, att. l/5th Batt. 
The South Staffordshire Regiment. 

Lance-Sergeant, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The 
Highland Light Infantry. 

Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, Anson 
Battalion, Royal Naval Division. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 
Private, 3rd Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 
Sapper, Royal Engineers. 

Motor Mechanic, Royal Naval Motor Boat Reserve. 
Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, 63rd 
Royal Naval Division. 

Lieutenant, Quebec Regiment. 

Trooper, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Lieutenant, 11th Batt. The Gordon Highlanders. 

Lance-Corporal, Rand Rifles, South African Forces. 

Lieutenant, Botha's Horse, South African Forces. 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers; Tyne Electrical 
Engineers. 

Private, Scottish Horse. 

Armourer Staff-Sergeant, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. 

Lance-Corporal, 2/ 1st Lanarkshire Yeomanry. 

Captain, 16th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, 1st Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Second Air Mechanic, Royal Air Force. 

Private, 2/10th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (Hackney). 



Private, 44th Canadian Infantry 
wick Regiment. 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

42 



New Bruns- 



Roll of Service 



Ross, R. Duff, 
Rougerelle, Alexander, 
Rounsfell, Walter, 
Rourke, Thomas, 
Roxburgh, George, 

Roxburgh, James, 

Runcie, Girvan H., 
Runciman, John, 
Russell, Adrian E., 
Russell, Alexander S., M.C., 
Russell, James, M.C., 
Russell, Richard H., M.S.M. : 

Rutherford, John A., 

Rutherfurd, Walter D., 



Corporal, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Corporal, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Sergeant, Royal Air Force. 

Private, 10th Batt. The Lancashire Fusiliers. 

Lance-Corporal, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, 
The Duke of Albany's). 

Lance-Corporal, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, 
The Duke of Albany's). 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Sapper, Royal Engineers. 

Lieutenant, Machine Gun Corps, att. Royal Air Force. 

Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Captain, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Sergeant, 16th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (Queen's Westminster Rifles). 

Corporal, 54th Canadian Infantry Battalion. 2nd 
Central- Ontario Regiment. 

Second Lieutenant, The Highland Light Infantry. 



Sadler, Louis A., 

Sanderson, John N., 
Schonfield, Edwin, 

Scott, David T. J., 
Scott, W. J. Irving, 

Selkirk, John G., 

Service, Robert W., 
Sharp, A. Cowan, 
Sharp, Robert M., 
Shields, John, D.C.M,. 
Sillars, D. Robertson, 



Second Lieutenant, l/7th Batt. Princess Louise's 
(Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Captain, 19th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (St. Pancras). 

Trooper, 4th (Queen's Own) Hussars. 

A/Captain, l/3rd Batt. The Royal Fusiliers (City of 
London Regiment). 

Cadet Company Sergeant-Major, Hillhead High School 
O.T.C. 

Driver, Anglo-American Ambulance Corps. 

Captain, 8th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Lieutenant (T/Captain), 1st Batt. Scots Guards. 

Lieutenant (A/Captain), 12th Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

43 



Hillhead High School 



Sillars, Thomas B., 

Simons, Frank, 
Simpson, John, 

Sinclair, Donald, 

Sinclair, Fred B., 
Sinclair, George B., 
Sinclair, H. S., 
Sinclair, Magnus G., 
Skilling, Sam R., M.A., 

Sloan, George H., 
Sloan, Sam M., M.B., 

Smith, Alexander, 

Smith, George E., 

Smith, J. C., 
Smith, J. Logan, 
Smith, William G., 

Smith, William H., 
Smyth, Mortimer, 
Sommerville, George L. 
Somerville, Ian F., 
Somei-ville, John, 

Somerville, Peter F., 

Somerville, Robert G., 

Speed, Andrew, 
Speed, Fred, 
Spence, James, 



Lieutenant, 12th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Private, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Gunner, Royal Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant, The Highland Light Infantry and Royal 
Flying Corps. 

Lance-Corporal, 1st Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Private, 4th Batt. The Gordon Highlanders. 

Private, Machine Gun Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, The Norfolk Regiment. 

Captain, Unattached List (T.F.), Hillhead High School 
O.T.C. 

Captain, 2nd Scottish Horse. 

Lieutenant-Colonel, Royal Army Medical Corps (T.F.), 
att. Scottish Horse. 

Captain, 4th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders. 

Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders. 

Second Air Mechanic, Royal Air Force. 

Private, The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Captain, 129th Duke of Connaught's Own Baluchis, 
Indian Army. 

Corporal, 10th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Private, The Connaught Rangers. 

Captain, The King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). 

Second Lieutenant, Labour Corps. 

Lance-Corporal, 9th (Highlanders) Batt. The Royal 
Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Private, 24th Batt. The Royal Fusiliers (City of London 
Regiment) (2nd Sportsman's). 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Gunner, Royal Field Artillery. 

Gunner, Royal Field Artillery. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

44 



Roll of Service 



Spiers, Alex. R., 
Squires, George H., 
Steel, Kenneth McL., 

Stenhouse, James A., M.B., 
Steven, James M., 

Stevenson, Alexander M., 

Stevenson, Guy H., 

Stevenson, James, 

Stevenson, John B., M.C., M.B., 

Stevenson, Lennox, M.C., 

Stevenson, William D. H., 
CLE., M.B., 

Stewart, Alex. R., 

Stewart, Archibald D., 
Stewart, Colin C, 
Stewart, George, M.A., 
Stewart, Henry A., 
Stewart, John C, 
Stewart, J. C, 

Stewart, Murdoch, 
Stewart, Walter R. T., 

Stirling, Alexander M., 
Stirling, John, 
Stocks, James B., 
Stoddart, Frank M., 
Sutherland, John, 
Sutherland, John W., M.B., 
Sutherland, Robert, M.B., 
Sutherland, Robert, 
Swann, William G. A., 



Private, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers). 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Captain, 2/76th Punjabis, Indian Army. 

Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Captain, Royal Air Force Medical Service. 

Lieutenant, The King's (Liverpool Regiment). 

Lieut. -Colonel, Indian Medical Service : Assistant 
Director-General, I.M.S. 

Lance-Corporal, 4th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders. 

First Aircraftsman, Royal Air Force. 

Private, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain, 26th Batt. The Northumberland Fusiliers. 

Guardsman, Scots Guards. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), att. 
The Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). 

Seaman Gunner, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Lieutenant, 9th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Private, 16th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

C.Q.M.S., Royal Army Service Corps (M.T.) 

Captain, Australian Infantry Forces. 

Lieutenant, Australian Army Medical 

Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lieutenant, Australian Infantry Forces. 

Gunner, Royal Field Artillery. 

45 



Hillhead High School 



Tainsh, E., 
Tainsh, Eben H., 
Tainsh, David MacD. H. 

Tainsh, Peter, 
Tait, Edward A., 
Taylor, Archibald C, 

Taylor, A. Cameron, 

Taylor, Harry, 

Taylor, J., 
Taylor, James K., 
Taylor, Sydney, 
Taylor, William McC, 

Taynton, G., 
Terris, Fred J. G., 
Tetley, Reginald, 

Tetley, William E., 
Thorn, Lennox, 
Thomlinson, William G., 
Thompson, George C, 

Thomson, Adrian, 
Thomson, Adrian J. R., 

Thomson, Alex. F., 
Thomson, David M., 
Thomson, William J., 

Thornton, Herbert, 



Lieutenant, The Eoyal Scots Fusiliers. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lieutenant, 3rd Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders. 

Lance-Corporal, 2nd Batt. The Gordon Highlanders. 

Private, 14th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, 23rd Batt. The Northumberland 
Fusiliers. 

Corporal, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 23rd Cavalry (Frontier Force), Indian 
Army. 

Private, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, Machine Gun Corps (Cavalry). 

Lieutenant, 9th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Corporal, Royal Engineers. 

Private, 1st Batt. The Gordon Highlanders. 

Second Air Mechanic (Wireless Operator), Royal Air 
Force. 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Driver, Royal Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 

Private, 14th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Second Lieutenant. 

Corporal, 5th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers. 

Officer, Transport Service. 

Private, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, 3rd Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders. 

Private, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

46 



Roll of Service 



Tissot, Emile L. R., 

Tissot, Jean U. R., 

Todd, John, M.M., 

Todd, W., 

Torrance, W. S., D.S.O. 
Trevor, Reginald D., 
Turnbull, William G., 
Turner, Arthur H., 
Turner, Frederick W., 

Turner, Jack, 
Turner, James, 



Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers). 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers). 



Sergeant, 11th Batt. The 
Regiment). 



Royal Scots (Lothian 



Lance-Corporal, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Engineer Lieutenant-Commander, Royal Navy. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Oameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Private, 2/1 st Fife and Forfar Yeomanry. 

Able Seaman, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. 

Second Lieutenant, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Second Lieutenant, Tank Corps. 

Private, 29th Canadian Infantry Battalion. British 
Columbia Regiment. 



Urquhart, Murray, M.C., 



u 



Major, Wellington Infantry Regiment, New Zealand. 



w 



Waddell, R. B., 

Waldie, James, 
Walker, Robert, 
Walker, William, 
Walker, William, 
Wallace, Ross C, 
Ward, Albert E., 

Ward, John, 
Ward, Thomas K. 



Captain, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. Served with Nigeria Regiment, 
West African Frontier Force. 

Lance-Corporal, Canadian Infantry Battalion. 

Sergeant, Royal Air Force. 

Private, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Sergeant Instructor, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Sergeant, l/6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The High- 
land Light Infantry. 

Driver, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Lieutenant, 9th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

47 



Hillhead High School 



Wardlaw, Ralph E., 
Watson, Frank M'E., 
Watson, James P. M., 
Watson, John D., 
Watson, John S., 
Watson, Mark S., M.A., 

Watson, Norman C, 

Watson, Robert, 
Watson, Robert S., 

Watt, J. L. P., 
Watt, William W., 

Webster, James D., 
Webster, J. G., 
Webster, R. W. Gordon, 
Webster, William, 
Weir, A. G, 
Welsh, William, 

West, Horace B., 
White, Alex. B., 

White, T. J., M.C., 

Whitefield, George R., 

Whitefield, William, 

Whitehead, Howard M., 

Whyte, A. Murray, Jun., 
C.A, 

Whyte, John A., 

Whyte, John M., 

Wilkinson, John M., 

Williamson, John R., 



Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Second Lieutenant, Machine Gun Corps. 

Sergeant, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Cadet, Royal Field Artillery. 

Captain, 9th Batt. The Border Regiment. 

Second Lieutenant, 1st Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, 6th, att. 12th Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Private, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Lieutenant, 4th, att. 10/1 lth Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Private, 10th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Private, 8th Batt. Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire 
Buffs, The Duke of Albany's). 

Corporal, Royal Engineers. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Private, 4th Batt. The Gordon Highlanders. 

Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Naval Air Service. 

Private, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 

Lieutenant (A/Captain), 5th Batt. The Cameronians 
(Scottish Rifles). 

Lieutenant, 16th Batt. The Royal Irish Rifles. 

Private, The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Royal Army Service Corps. 

Cadet, Royal Air Force. 

Lieutenant, The Royal Scots Fusiliers ; Captain, General 
Staff Officer, 3rd Grade, XVII. Army 



Bombardier, Royal Field Artillery. 
Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 
Staff-Sergeant, Royal Army Medical Corps. 
Cadet, Royal Field Artillery. 
48 



Roll of Service 



Williamson, Eobert C, 
Williamson, Stephen de T. 

Wilson, George, 
Wilson, G. Jackson, M.B., 
Wilson, James D., 
Wilson, John W., 
Wilson, Oswald, 

Wilson, Robert, 
Wilson, Robert A., 
Wilson, T., 
Wilson, Walter G., 

Wilson, William, 
Wilson, William, 
Wilson, William, 
Wilson, William G, 
Wilson, William I., 

Wither, J. Charles, 
Wood, John H., 

Workman, Hugh, 
Wright, A., 

Wright, Robert J., M.A., 
F.C.S., 



Lance-Corporal, Scottish Horse. 

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Private, The King's Own Scottish Borderers. 

Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Private, 3rd Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain, 1st Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant, 5th Batt. The Prince of Wales's 
(North Staffordshire Regiment), att. The York and 
Lancaster Regiment. 

Warrant Engineer, Royal Naval Reserve. 

Cadet, Glasgow University O.T.C. 

Corporal, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lance-Corporal, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Corporal, North Irish Horse. 

Private, 9th Batt. Australian Infantry. 

Private, 8th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 

Sergeant, Royal Air Force. 

Private, 15th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

Private, The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). 

Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 
Served under Air Ministry. 

Private, Royal Army Service Corps (M.T.) 



Lieutenant, 15th Batt. Australian Infantry. 



Youden, Fred C, 

Youden, William A., O.B.E., Lieutenant-Colonel, 4th Batt. The Norfolk Regiment. 
T.D., 



Young, Eric, 

D 



Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 
49 



Hillhead High School 



Young, George G., Private, 17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Young, J. Ronald, Captain, 10th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Young, T. P. W., Lieutenant, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Served under Air Ministry. 

Young, W. Oswald A., Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 



SERBIAN CADETS. 

Took part in the> Great Retreat of the Serbian Army over 
the Albanian Mountains. 



Avramovitch, Svetolik, 

Balitch, Krsta, 
Borovitch, Bozhidar, 
Deliny, Alexander, 

Djordjevitch, Slavoljub, 
Ivkovitch, Dragoslav, 
Krstitch, Dragoslav, 
Mititch, Dushan, 
Savitch, Alexander, 
Stoyanovitch, Dragolyub, 
Vukovitch, Branislav, 



Cadet Lance-Corporal Drummer, Hillhead High School 
O.T.C. 

Cadet, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Cadet, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Cadet Lance-Corporal Drummer, Hillhead High School 
O.T.C. 

Cadet Lance-Corporal, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Cadet, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Cadet, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Cadet, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Cadet, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Cadet, Hillhead High School O.T.C. 

Cadet, Hillhead High School O.T.C, 



Connal, Miss J. A., R.R.C., 
Dove, Miss Janie W., 
Duncan, Miss Annie, R.R.C., 

Duncan, Miss Jessie, R.R.C., 

Foster, Miss Chrissie, 
Glen, Miss J., 



LADIES. 

Staff Nurse, Territorial Force Nursing Service. 

Women's Royal Air Force. 

Sister, Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing 
Service Reserve. 

Sister, Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing 
Service Reserve. 

Red Cross Hospital Ship " Salta." 

Sister, Territorial Force Nursing Service. 

50 



Roll of Service 



Henderson, Miss Eadie P., 

Henderson, Miss Lena, 

Lang, Miss Helen L., 

Macphail, Miss Kath., 

Montgomerie, Miss Catheryn 
H., 

Paton, Mrs. Hope M., 

Pickering, Miss Lois L. R., 
Sharp, Miss Alice J., 
Stewart, Miss G. E., 
Wallace, Miss Bessie F., 
Watson, Miss Mildred, 
Wilson, Miss E. C, 
Wilson, Miss Marguerite, M.B. 



Women's Royal Air Force. 

St. Mary's Hospital. 

Nurse, Voluntary Aid Detachment. 

Scottish Women's Hospital, Serbia. 

Nurse, Territorial Force Nursing Service. 

Deputy Administrator, Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary 
Corps. 

Motor Driver, Women's Royal Air Force. 

Motor Driver, Scottish Churches' Huts, France. 

Queen Mary's Hospital, Whalley, Lancashire. 

Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 

Nurse. 

Scottish Red Cross, Rouen. 

Medical Officer, 1st Southern General Hospital, 
Birmingham ; R.A.M.C. (T.F.) 



51 



WAR HONOURS. 



THE MOST EMINENT ORDER OF THE INDIAN EMPIRE. 

3rd Class — Companion — CLE. 
Lieutenant-Colonel W. D. H. STEVENSON, M.B., Indian Medical Service. 



THE MOST EXCELLENT ORDER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE. 

3rd Class— Commander— C.B.E. 

Captain and Brevet-Major (Acting Lieutenant-Colonel) F. G. ORR, 
Royal Field Artillery. 

4th Class— Officer— O.B.E. 
Lieutenant-Colonel W. A. YOU DEN, T.D., 4th Batt. The Norfolk Regiment. 

5th Class— Member— M.B.E. 
Major A. L. HANNA, Royal Army Service Corps. 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER. 

Major A. C. FRAME,* 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain W. A. PARKER, Sth Batt., attached 9th Batt. The Cameronians 
(Scottish Rifles). 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the nine miles' 
advance east of Ypres from 28th September to 9th October, 1918. He was primarily 
responsible for maintaining the direction of the advance, and overcame many 
obstacles in the form of machine gun nests and concrete emplacements, keeping 
well up with the barrage, and consequently with light casualties." 

Engineer Lieutenant-Commander W. S. TORRANCE, Royal Navy. 



BAR TO MILITARY CROSS. 
Major J. M. LAIRD, M.C., Royal Field Artillery. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. As F.0.0. for two days 
supplied most valuable information for the heavy artillery, ensuring an accurate 
and telling fire on all hostile formations." 

52 



War Honours 



Lieutenant R. L. MACKAY, M.C., Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). 

" Under very heavy shelling, which had broken down all communications, 
this officer set out with a N.C.O. on a reconnaissance. He succeeded in getting 
in touch with the elements of all companies and in bringing back the first trust- 
worthy news of the situation. He was away for five hours, getting well in front of 
the outposts. By his courage and enterprise he cleared up a very obscure situation." 

Major J. W. MACK1NLAY, M.C., The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in twice assisting to organise 
and lead counter attacks, both of which were successful, under intense machine gun 
and artillery fire. Throughout the day he rendered great assistance in reorganising 
the battalion, and set a magnificent example to all ranks by his fine disregard for 
his own personal safety." 

Captain T. D. O. MACLAGAN, M.C.. 14th Batt. The London Regiment 
(London Scottish). 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When in command of a 
company he was ordered to advance over a most precipitous and dangerous piece 
of country in the dark. Though under heavy rifle fire, he succeeded in doing this, 
and made a breach in the enemy's line, gaining his ultimate objective in the face 
of considerable opposition." 



MILITARY CROSS. 

Lieutenant-Colonel F. AITKEN, Royal Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant A. A. M. ARNOT, Royal Air Force. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When engaging hostile 
troops with bombs and machine gun fire he was attacked by a large number of 
enemy aircraft. He engaged the hostile machines in a most gallant manner, one 
of which he destroyed. On a previous occasion he shot down another enemy plane, 
which fell in flames. During the last four months he has carried out offensive 
patrols at very low altitudes under adverse weather conditions with conspicuous 
skill and success." 

Captain A. C. BALFOUR, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain A. G. BISSET, M.B., Royal Army Medical Corps, attached 
1st Royal Munster Fusiliers. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During heavy shelling 
of his battalion, when it was impossible to establish a dressing station, he went 
up and down the line himself attending to the men as they fell. Whenever a shell 
burst in the vicinity he at once hastened to the spot, and did not leave the shelled 
area after his battalion had moved off until every case had been evacuated. He 
has shown the greatest gallantry and coolness at all times, notably on one occasion, 
when, although badly gassed and unable to stand, he continued to attend the 
wounded until he collapsed." 

53 



Hillhead High School 



Captain N. S. BRUCE, M.B., Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Captain R. E. BRYSON, Royal Air Force. 

" For conspicuous gallantry during a raid on the enemy's trenches. He showed 
great dash in hand-to-hand fighting." 

Second Lieutenant J. N. CARPENTER, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Lieutenant (Acting Captain) A. W. CAVE, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain A. T. COLTART, The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack and the 
subsequent consolidation of the captured position he laid and repaired telephone 
wires to the front line. He worked continuously for six hours under heavy shell 
fire, and showed great coolness and resource." 

Captain J. S. COLTART, The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

" For conspicuous gallantry in action. When all the officers of his battalion 
had become casualties he rallied the men and hung on to the ground already won, 
in spite of the enemy's efforts to turn him out. He showed great pluck and 
determination." 

Second Lieutenant W. G. DOUGLAS, Royal Field Artillery. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while in charge of a forward 
gun during an enemy attack. The gun was continuously shelled, and small dumps 
of ammunition caught fire. He put out the fires as they occurred, and kept the gun 
going throughout." 

Lieutenant H. FERGUSON, Royal Engineers (Signal Service). 

Lieutenant (Acting Captain) A. F. FLINT, Royal Field Artillery. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in a raid. He accompanied 
the battalion commander as a liaison officer, and while approaching the enemy's 
trenches showed great coolness and pluck in a fight at close quarters with a party 
of the enemy who suddenly sprang out of the grass. Several were killed, and he 
personally took a prisoner. Throughout he was of great assistance." 

Lieutenant A. J. GRANT, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain D. S. HALL, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) and 
Royal Flying Corps. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While leading back his 
formation of five machines from a bombing raid he was attacked on eight different 
occasions by numerous enemy scouts. He himself shot down one in flames and 
another out of control, while his observer shot down two in flames. He has at all 
times completed the task allotted to him, and set a splendid example." 

Major J. M W. HALLEY, Royal Engineers. 

54 



War Honours 



Captain J. A. HARPER, M.A., M.B., Royal Army Medical Corps. 

" For conspicuous gallantry when leading stretcher-bearers during operations. 
On one occasion, whon three of his bearers were wounded, he went alone, under 
heavy shell fire, to the aid post." 

Major D. H. HAUGH, The Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, The Duke 
of Albany's), attached Machine Gun Corps. 

Captain (Acting Major) A. H. HILL, 4th Highland (Mountain) Brigade, 
Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Second Lieutenant H. W. JORDAN, The Durham Light Infantry. 

" During a raid this officer was in command of the party on the right, which 
met with considerable opposition from the enemy. He attacked them with great 
boldness and determination,. entering their trenches and killing many of the garrison. 
He himself was wounded in the head, but continued to command his own men 
until they were withdrawn. His coolness and courage were conspicuous throughout 
the operation." 

Major J. M. LAIRD, Royal Field Artillery. 

Brevet-Major N. V. LOTHIAN, B.Sc, M.B., D.P.H., Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lieutenant N. M'GAVIN, The Royal Irish Rifles. 

Lieutenant R. L. MACKAY, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as signalling officer. When 
no company officers were left he volunteered to go forward, and took complete 
charge of half a battalion front, reorganising it to meet a threatened attack. He 
was slightly wounded in the knee, but continued until ordered to withdraw." 

Major J. W. MACKINLAY, The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Captain T. D. O. MACLAGAN, 14th Batt. The London Regiment (London Scottish). 

'••' For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led a raiding party with great 
courage and determination. Later, under very heavy fire, he rescued many wounded 
men. He has previously done fine work." 

Lieutenant W. M'MINN, M.A-, The Royal Scots Fusiliers, 

" This officer took command of the party after the CO. had been wounded, 
and at once formed blocks in the trench to stop the enemy, who had broken in. 
Although he was twice buried and the trench was badly knocked about, he held on 
till nearly surrounded." 

Lieutenant J. MARSHALL, M.B., Royal Army Medical Corps. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When in charge of stretcher 
squads he succeeded in evacuating all the wounded during a critical period of with- 
drawal from a village, frequently going forward beyond the firing line in order to 
accomplish his task." 

55 



Hillhead High School 



Captain G. MENARY, M.A., The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his company with 

great skill and courage through a heavy barrage. He captured one field battery 

and a battery of field howitzers and several prisoners. He set a splendid example 
throughout." 

Captain A. U. MILLAR, M.B., Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lieutenant J. MILLIKEN, Tank Corps. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer was in charge 
of a group of Lewis guns supporting some infantry in an attack. When they gained 
their objective he covered them while they were consolidating, under heavy fire, 
and skilfully working round a small wood captured thirty prisoners and a machine 
gun. On receiving orders to withdraw he brought his guns back without loss, and 
carried a wounded officer for some distance. He set a fine example to those under 
him." 

Lieutenant G. MORTON, Machine Gun Corps. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When his machine guns 
were advancing to cover infantry they came under intense fire of all kinds. Two 
infantry platoons became disorganised, and the advance stopped. This officer 
promptly went forward with one man of his section, reorganised the infantry, and 
led them forward 300 yards and outflanked and silenced the enemy machine guns 
which were holding up the advance. While returning to his section he was severely 
wounded. He displayed great courage and initiative, and rendered very valuable 
service." 

Captain H. N. MORTON, Tank Corps. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. His tank was the first to 
enter a village in the enemy's lines, and, though very short of ammunition, he 
assisted the infantry with great skill until all his guns were out of action and his 
ammunition was exhausted." 

Captain T. W. MOTTRAM, The King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). 

" During an attack, when his CO. was killed he assumed command. Although 
wounded he led his men forward in a second attack until incapacitated by a second 
wound." 

Captain H. S. MUIR, The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). 

Major T. W. MURRAY, Royal Field Artillery. 

" For conspicuous gallantry during operations. He carried out six reconnais- 
sances beyond the front line with great coolness and skill. On one occasion, when 
establishing O.P.'s with some pioneers, he was slightly wounded, but stuck to his 
duty." 

Captain G. L. PILLANS, M.B., Royal Army Medical Corps. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He showed great deter- 
mination and courage in leading bearer squads through heavy barrage. This he 
did several times, and throughout superintended the evacuation under heavy shell 
fire." 

56 



War Honours 



Sub-Lieutenant C. M. ROBERTSON, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, 
63rd Royal Naval Division. 

" For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He led his men splendidly, 
and when units on his flank were compelled to retire he established a flank defence 
which he led until he was severely wounded. By his prompt action and courage a 
critical situation was averted." 

Captain A. S. RUSSELL, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Captain J. RUSSELL, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain J. B. STEVENSON, M.B., Royal Army Medical Corps. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On four separate occasions 
he personally conducted stretcher-bearers through very heavy fire to succour 
wounded men. Later, although himself wounded, he continued to carry on his 
work." 

Lieutenant L. STEVENSON, The King's (Liverpool Regiment). 

" He took over command of his company in the middle of the operations, and 
held the line under the most difficult conditions, his left flank being exposed. He 
organised the company and captured an enemy machine gun. He subsequently led 
his company forward and established a consolidated line in communication with the 
battalion on his left. He showed great courage and resource under continuous fire 
and during several enemy counter attacks." 

Major M. URQUHART, Wellington Infantry Regiment, New Zealand. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when commanding his 
company in an attack. In spite of no barrage being available, ' and of the fact that 
the enemy's position was exceptionally strong and heavily wired, he so admirably 
arranged his plans that he overcame the stubborn opposition which was offered, 
and captured the position, killing and capturing numbers of the enemy. After this 
was effected he held the position for twenty-four hours under a violent bombardment, 
displaying the same splendid coolness and courage throughout and greatly inspiring 
his men by his personal example under very trying conditions." 

Lieutenant T. J. WHITE, The Royal Irish Rifles. 



MEDAL FOR DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT IN THE FIELD 
(D.C.M.). 

Corporal G. G. BLAIR, 8th Batt. The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). 

Corporal D. MURRAY, 2nd Canadian Artillery Brigade Headquarters, 
1st Canadian Contingent. Now Lieutenant, Canadian Field Artillery. 

Company Sergeant-Major S. D. REITH, B.Sc, 17th Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. Afterwards Lieutenant, Indian Army, Deoli Regiment. 

" For gallant conduct and devotion to duty on the field on the night of 22nd 
April, 1916, during raid near Thiepval." 

57 



Hillhead High School 



Lance-Sergeant J. SHIELDS, 1st Batt. Scots Guards. 
Now Lieutenant (Acting-Captain), 3rd Batt. Scots Guards. 

" For conspicuous gallantry and ability from 27th October to 11th November, 
1914, neai- the Menin Road, when he obtained much valuable information at great 
risk whilst patrolling. He was very useful against hostile snipers until wounded." 



BAR TO MILITARY MEDAL. 
Sergeant J. TODD, M.M., The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

MILITARY MEDAL. 

Sergeant K. ARMSTRONG, 1st Canadian Expeditionary Force. 

Private G. F. BROWN, 6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 

Private F. H. R. BUTTERS, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 
Afterwards Second Lieutenant, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Sergeant R. S. CAPPELL, Royal Engineers. Afterwards Second Lieutenant, 
Royal Engineers. 

Corporal C. G. EMSLIE, Canadian Engineers. 

Sergeant J. W. EMSLIE, 31st Canadian Infantry Battalion. 

Private E. GEYER, 6th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 

Corporal W. HUTTON, Australian Field Artillery. 

Gunner R. G. KAY, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Sergeant J. TODD, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL. 

Sergeant R. H. RUSSELL, 16th Batt. The London Regiment 
(Queen's Westminster Rifles). 

THE ROYAL RED CROSS. 

2nd Class 

Miss J. A. CONNAL, Sister, T.F.N.S. 

Miss ANNIE DUNCAN, Sister, Q.A.I.M.N.S.R. 

Miss JESSIE DUNCAN, Sister, Q.A.I.M.N.S.R. 

58 



War Honours 



MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES. 

Lieutenant-Colonel F. AITKEN, M.C., Royal Field Artillery. Twice Mentioned. 

Captain A. C. BALFOUR, The Highland Light Infantry. 

Captain A. G. BISSET, M.C., M.B., Royal Army Medical Corps, attached 
1st Royal Munster Fusiliers. 

Captain J. BURLEIGH, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Lieutenant J. CAMPBELL, Royal Army Service Corps. 

Lieutenant A. T. COLTART, M.C., The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 

Lieutenant A. CROMBIE, The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). 

Squadron Sergeant-Major J. M. DOUGAN. Queen's Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry. 

Captain J. DUNN, Queen Victoria's Own Sappers and Miners (Indian Army). 

Captain T. J. DUNN, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lieutenant and Quartermaster J. FAICHNEY, M.A., B.Sc, 
The Highland Light Infantry. 

Major A. C. FRAME, D.S.O., 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. 
The Highland Light Infantry. Twice Mentioned. 

Lance-Corporal T. M'V. GOSSMAN, The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). 

Captain H. C. GUTHRIE, The East Yorkshire Regiment. 

Major R. H. B. HALDANE, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). 

Major D. H. HAUGH, M.C., The Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, 
The Duke of Albany's). 

Captain (Acting-Major) A. H. HILL, M.C., 4th Highland (Mountain) Brigade, 
Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Corporal C. L. D. HORN, Royal Field Artillery. 

Second Lieutenant J. C. HORN, Royal Field Artillery. 

Lieutenant E. M'D. S. HOUSTOUN, C.A., The King's Own Scottish Borderers. 

Captain E. W. LANGLANDS, The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Lieutenant S. LINDSAY, Royal Air Force. 

Brevet-Major N. V. LOTHIAN, M.C., B.Sc, M.B., D.P.H., 
Royal Army Medical Corps. Five Times Mentioned. 

Captain A. T. INGLIS MACDONALD, M.D., D.P.H., 
Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Lieutenant N. M'GAVIN, M.C., The Royal Irish Rifles. 

Lieutenant (Acting-Captain) R. D. M'lLROY, M.A., Princess Louise's 
(Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). 

59 



Hillhead High School 



Bombardier M. M'KINNON, Royal Field Artillery. 

Second Lieutenant J. F. M'NEIL, Royal Field Artillery. 

Captain C. K. MARTIN, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) 
and Royal Air Force 

Captain A. U. MILLAR, M.C., M.B., Royal Army Medical Corps, attached 
l/5th North Staffordshire Regiment. 

Lieutenant G. H. MORRIS, Royal Navy Twice Mentioned. 

Lieutenant D. MURRAY, D.C.M., Canadian Field Artillery. 

Major T. W. MURRAY, M.C., Royal Field Artillery. Twice Mentioned. 

Captain and Brevet-Major F. G. ORR, C.B.E.. Royal Field Artillery. 
Twice Mentioned. 

Lieutenant R. M. SHARP, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Major M. URQUHART, M.C., Wellington Infantry Regiment, New Zealand. 

Lieutenant A. M. WHYTE, C.A., The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Lieutenant-Colonel W. A. YOUDEN, O.B.E., T.D., The Norfolk Regiment. 

Sister J. A. CONNAL, T.F.N.S. 

Sister A. DUNCAN, Q.A.I. M.N.S.R. Twice Mentioned. 



FOREIGN DECORATIONS. 
CROIX DE GUERRE (FRANCE). 

Corporal G. G. BLAIR, D.C.M., The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). 
With Silver Star. 

Brevet-Major N. V. LOTHIAN, M.C., B.Sc, M.B., D.P.H., 
Royal Army Medical Corps. 

Major J. W. MACKINLAY, M.C., The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 
With Silver Gilt Star. 



MEDAILLE DES EPIDEMIES (FRANCE). 

Captain T. J. MURRAY, Royal Army Medical Corps. 

ORDER OF THE CROWN (BELGIUM). 

Major J M. LAIRD, M.C., Royal Field Artillery. Officer. 
60 



War Honours 



CROIX DE GUERRE (BELGIUM). 
Major J. M. LAIRD, M.C.. Royal Field Artillery. 

ITALIAN BRONZE MEDAL FOR MILITARY VALOUR. 

Lieutenant G. H. MORRIS, Royal Navy. 

ORDER OF THE NILE (EGYPT). 

Captain T. D. O. MACLAGAN, M.C., 14th Batt. The London Regiment 
(London Scottish). 

ORDER OF DANILO (MONTENEGRO). 

Major M. URQUHART, M.C., Wellington Infantry Regiment, New Zeaiand. 
5th Class. 

GREEK MILITARY CROSS. 

Captain (Acting-Major) A. H. HILL, M.C., 4th Highland (Mountain) Brigade 
Royal Garrison Artillery. 

ORDER OF THE CROWN (ROUMANIA). 

Lieutenant O. C. W. PETERSEN, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. 
The Highland Light Infantry. 5th Class — Chevalier. 



Gl 



PRO PATRIA. 



They have fought the good fight, 
They have kept the faith. 



W. FA1RLIE ALEXANDER, 

Lieutenant 9th (Glasgow Highland) 
Battalion The Highland Light 
Infantry. Killed in action, 12th 
October, 1918. 



RAMSAY ALLAN, 

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 
Killed in action, 22nd April, 1918. 

S. J. ANCILL, L.D.S., 

Captain, General List. Died of 
malaria at Baghdad, 4th July, 
1920. 



H. M. BAILLIE, 

Corporal, Machine Gun Corps. 
Killed in action, 26th September, 
1917. 



J. H. H. BAIRD, 

Sergeant, 17th (Service) Battalion 
The Highland Light Infantry (3rd 
Glasgow). Wounded and missing 
since 18th November, 1916. 



J. ROBERTSON BAIRD, 

Private, Canadian Mounted Rifles. 
Killed at Ypres, 3rd June, 1916. 



. F. ANDERSON, 

Sergeant, The Royal Fusiliers. 
in action, 15th July, 1916. 



Killed 



J. L. ARMSTRONG, 

Sergeant, 16th (Service) Battalion 
The Highland Light Infantry (2nd 
Glasgow). Killed in action in 
France, 7th January, 1916. 



A. A. M. ARNOT, M.C., 

Lieutenant. Royal Air Force. Killed 
in action, 12th April, 1918. 



R. H. ARROLL, 

L. -Corporal, Seaforth Highlanders 
(Ross-shire Buffs, The Duke of 
Albany's). Died of wounds received 
in action, 24th August, 1917. 



G. J. BALFOUR, 

2nd Lieutenant, 6th (T.) Battalion 
The Highland Light Infantry, 
attached to the Northumberland 
Fusiliers. Killed in action, 15th 
September, 1916. 

F. H. BLACKIE, 

Lieutenant, 8th Battalion The 
Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), at- 
tached King's African Rifles. Killed 
in action near Kariwa, P.E. Africa, 
11th April, 1918. 



J. STANLEY BONE, 

L. -Corporal, Princess Louise's (Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders), at- 
tached Machine Gun Corps. Died 
whilst on active service, 18th June, 
1918. 



List of Fallen 



A. S. H. BOWIE, 



2nd Lieutenant, Royal Garrison 
Artillery. Killed in action, 9th 
May, 1918. 



C. T. BROWN, jun., 

2nd Lieutenant, 8th (The Argyllshire) 
Battalion Princess Louise's (Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders). Killed 
in action, 17th March, 1917. 



A. M. BRUCE, 

2nd Lieutenant, 9th (Glasgow High- 
land) Battalion The Highland Light 
Infantry. Killed in action, 29th 
September, 1918. 

C. J. BRUCE, 

2nd Lieutenant, Army Cyclist Corps. 
Died of wounds in Egypt, 21st May, 
1917. 



R. M. BURNIE, 

L. -Corporal, 9th (Glasgow Highland) 
Battalion The Highland Light 
Infantry. Killed in action, 1st 
November, 1916. 



G. R. CAIRNS, M.A., 

2nd Lieut., 3rd Lowland Division, 
Royal Field Artillery (T.). Died at 
Gallipoli on 4th January, 1916, from 
wounds received in action. 



W. H. CAMERON, 

2nd Lieutenant, 6th (Service) Bat- 
talion The Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders. Killed in action, 11th 
April, 1917. 



W. K. CAMERON, 

Private, 7th (Service) Battalion The 
Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 
Killed in action in France, 25th 
September, 1915. 



A. M. CAMPBELL, 

Lieutenant, Seaforth Highlanders 
(Ross-shire Buffs, The Duke of 
Albany's). Killed in action, 22nd 
March, 1918. 



A. S. CAMPBELL, 

Private, 5th (Service) Battalion The 
Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 
(Lochiel's). Missing since 27th 
September, 1915, presumed killed. 



J. C. CAMPBELL, 

Private, 5th (Service) Battalion The 
Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 
(Lochiel's). Wounded and missing 
since 25th September, 1915, presumed 
killed. 



NATHANIEL CAMPBELL, 

Corporal, 12th (Service) Battalion 
The Highland Light Infantry. Killed 
in action, 25th March 1918. 



J. N. CARPENTER, M.C., 

2nd Lieutenant, 17th Battalion The 
Highland Light Infantry. Killed in 
action, 1st July, 1916. 

A. CARSWELL, 

Signaller, 9th (Glasgow Highland") 
Battalion The Highland Light 
Infantry (T.). Died of wounds at a 
Casualty Clearing Station in France 
on 21st May, 1917. 

J. S. CHALMERS, B.L., 

Major, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Bat- 
talion The Highland Light Infantry. 
Killed in action, 17th April, 1918. 

J. O. CHISHOLM, 

Lieutenant. 14th Battalion The Royal 
Scots (Lothian Regiment). Died of 
wounds, 23rd July, 1918. 



63 



Hillhead High School 



R. C. CHRISTISON, B.Sc, 

Lieutenant, 10th (Service) Battalion 
The Gordon Highlanders. Wounded 
and missing, 25th September, 1915. 

M. B. CLARK, 

Lieutenant (Acting Captain), 1st 
Battalion Princess Louise's (Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders). Killed 
in action, 25th September, 1917. 

E. M. CONNELL, 

Lieutenant, Canadian Highlanders. 
Killed in action, 13th June, 1916. 



D. M'D. COWIE, 

Captain, The Highland Light 
Infantry. Died of wounds received 
in action, 17th September, 1916. 

W. COWIE, 

2nd Lieutenant, The Royal Scots 
(Lothian Regiment). Died of wounds 
received in action, 25th September, 
1916. 

A. ALLAN CRUICKSHANK, 

L. -Corporal, 17th (Service) Battalion 
The Highland Light Infantry (3rd 
Glasgow). Missing since 1st July, 
1916. 

A. CUNNINGHAM, 

Private, The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles), attached The Royal Scots 
(Lothian Regiment). Died of wounds 
received in action, 2nd September, 
1918. 



Killed in action, 



A. J. CURRIE, 

O. S. Royal Navy. 
17th November, 1917. 

F. B. DAVIDSON, 

2nd Lieutenant, 6th Battalion The 
Highland Light Infantry (T.). Died 



of wounds received in Gallipoli, 10th 
September, 1915. 



J. DICK, 

Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery. 
Killed in action, 21st September, 
1917. 



J. HAMILTON DICKSON, L.D.S., 

2nd Lieutenant, The Queen's Own 
Cameron Highlanders, Special 
Reserve, attached 1st Battalion. 
Wounded and missing, 14th Sept., 
1914. 

W. G. DOUGLAS, M.C., 

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Field Artil- 
lery. Died of pneumonia, 26th 
February, 1919. 

J. K. DRON, 

Lieutenant, The Highland Light 
Infantry, attached The King's Own 
Scottish Borderers. Killed in action, 
13th October, 1918. 

D. DRUMMOND, 

Private, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross- 
shire Buffs, The Duke of Albany's). 
Died, 5th November, 1918. 

G. C. DUFFUS, 

L. -Corporal, 78th Batt. Canadian 
Infantry (Winnipeg Grenadiers). 
Died of wounds, 24th December, 
1916. 

H. S. A. DUNLOP, 

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 
Killed in aeroplane accident, 4th 
April, 1918. 

M. S. DUNLOP, 

Private, 11th (Service) Battalion The 
Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 
Killed in action in France, 29th 
September, 1918. 



64 



List of Fallen 



R. DUNLOP, 

Private, 14th (County of London) 
Battalion The London Regiment 
(London Scottish). Killed in action, 
1st August, 1918. 

J. DUNN, 

Captain, 2nd Queen Victoria's Own 
Sappers and Miners (Indian Army). 
Died of wounds, 14th November, 
1918. 



W. M. C. HAIR, 

Rifleman, New Zealand Rifle Brigade. 
Killed in action, September, 1916. 

D. S. HALL, M.C., 

Captain and Flight Commander, 
Princess Louise's (Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders), and Royal Flying 
Corps. Killed in action, 20th 
November, 1917. 



T. S. DUNN. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians 
(Scottish Rifles) (T.). Killed in 
action, 29th October, 1916. 



J. M. W. HALLEY, M.C., 

Major, Royal Engineers. Killed in 
action, 24th October, 1918. 



J. W. EMSLIE, M.M., 

Sergeant, 31st Canadian Infantry 
Battalion. Killed in action, 6th 
November, 1917. 

T. M'D FERGUSON, 

Private, 1st Battalion The Highland 
Light Infantry. Died of wounds, 
2nd November. 1918. 



D. L. M'P. FLECK, 

Private, 44th Battalion Canadian 
Infantry. Killed in action, 10th 
August, 1918. 

W. FREER, 

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. 
Missing since 6th October, 1918. 



M. W. HALLEY, 

Lieutenant, Indian Army Reserve of 
Officers. Died of Blackwater Fever 
at Moguk, Upper Burmah, 29th 
November, 1914. 



G. HAMMOND, 

2nd Lieutenant, 6th (City of Glas- 
gow) Battalion The Highland Light 
Infantry (T.). Died on 27th April, 
1917, of gunshot wound received in 
action. 



J. HANNAH, 

Private, The King's Own Scottish 
Borderers. Died on 7th January, 
1918, of wounds received in action, 
16th December, 1917. 



E. A. GORDON, 



2nd Lieutenant, 3rd (Reserve) Bat- 
talion The Highland Light Infantry. 
Killed in action, 21st March, 1918. 



G. M. HARLEY, 

Captain, 12th (Service) Battalion 
The Highland Light Infantry. Killed 
in action in France, 25th September, 
1915. 



H. J. GRAHAM, 

L. -Corporal, 9th (Service) Battalion 
The Black Watch (Royal High- 
landers). Killed in action in 
France, 25th September, 1915. 



J. A. HARPER, M.C., M.A., M.B., Ch.B., 
Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. 
Killed in action in France, 14th 
February, 1917. 



fir, 



Hillhead High School 



A M. HART, 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) 
Battalion The Highland Light 
Infantry. Killed in action, 15th 
July, 1916. 

ROY D. HARVEY, 

Private, The Royal Scots, attached 
The Highland Light Infantry. Killed 
in action, 11th August, 1918. 

G. R. HAY, 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) 
Battalion The Highland Light 
Infantry. Killed in action, 15th 
July, 1916. 

J. HENRY. 

Lieutenant, Army Cyclist Corps. 
Killed in action, " 13th' April, 1918. 

R. W. HENRY, 

C.Q.M.S., 16th Battalion Canadian 
Infantry (Canadian Scottish). Killed 
in action, 20th May, 1915. 



J. D. HERBERTSON, 

Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer 
Reserve. Drowned through the 
foundering of Motor Launch 373 off 
Land's End, 30th November, 1919. 

A. R. INGRAM, 

Corporal, 14th (County of London) 
Battalion The London Regiment 
(London Scottish). Killed in action, 
17th April, 1917. 

H. JACK, 

Private, 12th Battalion The Royal 
Scots (Lothian Regiment). Missing 
since 25th April, 1918. 

J. C. A. JAMES, 

Corporal, Honourable Artillery Com- 
pany. Killed in action in Flanders, 
30th September, 1915. 



D. R. F. LAMONT, 

Sergeant, 1st Battalion The Gordon 
Highlanders. Died on 5th February, 
1918, of wounds received in action at 
the Battle of the Marne, September 
1914. 



A. LANG, 

Sergeant, 17th (Service) Battalion 
The Highland Light Infantry (3rd 
Glasgow). Died on 28th July, 1916, 
of gunshot wound in the head. 



L. E. LEVY, 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians 
(Scottish Rifles). Killed in action, 
16th August, 1916. 

J. F. LOGAN, 

2nd Lieutenant, 1st Battalion The 
Royal Scots Fusiliers. Killed in 
action, 12th April, 1918. 



P. A. E. M'CRACKEN, 

Lieutenant, The Highland Light 
Infantry. Killed in action, 16th 
September, 1918. 

Rev. C. GORDON MACDONALD, M.A., 
Lieutenant, 6th Battalion The 
Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) (T.). 
Killed in action in France, 15th 
June, 1915. 



ARCHIBALD MACDOUGALL, 

Captain, 8th Batt. The Cameronians 
(Scottish Rifles). Killed in action, 
31st October, 1918. 



STEWART D. MACDOUGALL, 

Signalman, Royal Naval Volunteer 
Reserve, Clyde. Killed in action on 
H.M.S. " Iris II.," at Zeebrugge, 
23rd April, 1918. 



66 



List of Fallen 



G. C. M'EWAN, 
Lieutenant. Royal Air Force. Missing 
since 7th June, 1918. 



M. M'KINNON, 



Bombardier, Royal Field Artillery. 
Killed in action, 18th January, 1918. 



F. D. MACINNES, 

Private, 31st Alberta Battalion 
Canadian Expeditionary Force. 
Killed in action, 13th October, 1915. 



A. M'LACHLAN, 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders). Missing 
since 21st March, 1918. 



J. F. MACINNES, 

Private, 28th Battalion Canadian 
Expeditionary Force. Killed in 
action, 5th April, 1916. 



J. M'LAGAN, B.Sc, 

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. 
Killed, as the result of a bomb 
accident, 8th June, 1916. 



J. M'INTOSH, 

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Garrison 
Artillery. Killed in action, 11th 
April, 1918. 

P. M'INTYRE, 

Private, 2nd Battalion Princess 
Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders). Killed in action near 
Cambrai, 24th September, 1918. 

F. R. MACKENZIE, 

Lieutenant, Seaforth Highlanders 

(Ross-shire Buffs, The Duke of 

Albany's). Missing since July, 
1916. 



R. C. MACKENZIE, 

Private, 6th Battalion The Highland 
Light Infantry (T.). Killed in action 
at the Dardanelles, 12th July, 1915. 

G. A. C. MACKINLAY, M.A., 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians 
(Scottish Rifles) (T.). Killed in 
action, 15th August, 1917. 

R. G. M'KINLAY, 

2nd Lieutenant, 10th (Service) Bat- 
talion The Highland Light Infantry. 
Killed in action in France, 26th-27th 
September, 1915. 



T. D. O. MACLAGAN, M.C. (Bar), Order 
of the Nile, 

Captain, 14th (County of London) 
Battalion, The London Regiment 
(London Scottish). Killed in action, 
30th April, 1918. 



R. G. A. MACLAREN, 

L. -Corporal, 6th Battalion The High- 
land Light Infantry (T.) Died of 
wounds received in Gallipoli, 17th 
July, 1915. 



A. M. MACLEAN, 

Captain, Royal Air Force. Missing 
since 12th April, 1918. 

DONALD M'LEAN, 

2nd Lieutenant, The Cameronians 
(Scottish Rifles). Killed in action, 
21st September, 1918. 

W. A. MACLEAN, M.A., 

2nd Lieutenant, 1st Battalion The 
Highland Light Infantry. Killed in 
action in France, 14th March, 1915. 



R. LINDSAY M'MUTRIE, 

Lieutenant (Acting Captain), The 
Royal Scots Fusiliers. Killed in 
action, 21st August, 1918. 



67 



Hillhead High School 



J. F. M'NEIL, 

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Field Artil- 
lery. Died of wounds, Steptember, 
1918. 

W. M'NEIL, 

Corporal, 5th (T.) Battalion The 
Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Killed 
in action, 31st July, 1916. 

A. F. MARSHALL, 

Private, The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles). Killed in action, 16th April, 
1918. 

A. G. MARSHALL, 

Captain, 17th Battalion The High- 
land Light Infantry. Killed in 
action, 12th February, 1917. 



J- MOLLISON, 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. Miss- 
ing since September, 1918. 

W. ALLAN MOLLISON, 

Lieutenant, Machine Gun Corps. 
Died of wounds, 1st October, 1918. 



J. LOVE MONTGOMERIE, 

Lieutenant, Singapore Volunteer 
Rifles. Killed during the Singapore 
Riots, 15th February, 1915. 

W. M. MONTGOMERIE, 

Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery. 
Died of wounds, 1st September, 
1918. 



W. S. MARTIN, 

Private, 1st Garrison Battalion The 
Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 
Died of pneumonia at Alexandria, 
Egypt, 10th January, 1919. 



W. MORLAND, 

2nd Lieutenant, The Highland Light 
Infantry, attached Trench Mortar 
Batteries. Killed in action, 2nd 
December, 1917. 



F. T. MATHER. 

Private, 16th Battalion The Royal 
Scots (Lothian Regiment). Missing 
since April, 1918. 

A. C. MECHAN, 

L. -Corporal, 5th Battalion The 
Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 
Missing, presumed killed, 25th 
September, 1915. 

J. A. MILLER, 

Engine-room Artificer, Royal Naval 
Reserve. Lost at sea, 11th March, 
1915. 

J. M. MOIR, M.A., 

2nd Lieutenant, 1st Battalion The 
Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). 
Killed in action in France, 25th 
September, 1915. 



J. H. G. MORRISON, 

Engine-room Artificer, Royal Navy. 
Lost at sea, 9th December, 1917. 



J. I. MORRISON, 

Lieutenant, The Royal Scots Fusi- 
liers. Died on 28th September, 1916, 
of wounds received in action on 16th 
September. 

J. S. MORRISON, 

2nd Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion The 
Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Died 
of wounds received in action, 14th 
May, 1917. 

R. W. MORRISON, 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Bat- 
talion The Highland Light Infantry. 
Died, 13th April, 1919. 



List of Fallen 



J. T. KINGSTON MORTON, 

Private, 17th (Service) Battalion The 
Highland Light Infantry (3rd Glas- 
gow). Killed in action, 1st July, 
1918. 



F. MOTTRAM, 
Captain, Royal Field Artillery. Died 
of wounds received in action, 9th 
September, 1917. 



J. MURRAY, B.Sc, 

Engineer-Lieutenant, Royal Navy. 
Lost at sea, 7th March, 1916. 



R. G. MURRAY, 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) 
Battalion The Highland Light In- 
fantry. Killed in action, 15th July, 
1916. 



W. H. MURRAY, 

" Expert in Demolitions," 1st Field 
Company, Divisional Engineers. 
Killed in Gallipoli, 9th June, 1915. 



J. NANCE, 

L. -Corporal, 5th (Service) Battalion 
The Queen's Own Cameron High- 
landers (Lochiel's). Killed in action, 
17th August, 1916. 



W. C. De NANCE, 

L. -Corporal, 5th (T.) Battalion The 
Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Killed 
in action, 20th May, 1917. 



Rev. R. H. NAPIER, B.D., 

Lieutenant, 4/ 1st Battalion King's 
African Rifles; Intelligence Officer, 
Nyasaland Field Force. Killed in 
action in Portuguese East Africa, 
11th February, 1918. 



J. T. NEILSON, 

2nd Lieutenant, 8th Battalion The 
Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Killed 
in action, 2nd November, 1917. 

G. NELSON, 

L. -Corporal, The King's Own (York- 
shire Light Infantry). Died of 
wounds, 24th January, 1917. 

J. NICOLSON, 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. Killed 
in action, 24th September, 1918. 

STUART H. NIMMO, 

Captain, 9th Battalion The Royal 
Scots Fusiliers. Killed in action 
19th September, 1918. 

R. OSBOURNE, 

Captain. 9th (Glasgow Highland) 
Battalion The Highland Light In- 
fantry. Killed in action, 2nd March, 
1917. 



J. R. PARKER, 

Sergeant, 17th (Service) Battalion 
The Highland Light Infantry (3rd 
Glasgow). Wounded and missing 
since 1st July, 1916. 

S. S. PICKEN, 

Private, Machine Gun Corps. Killed 
in action, 14th April, 1918. 

A. A. RALSTON, 

L. -Corporal, l/6th Battalion The 
Highland Light Infantry (T.). 
Killed in action at the Dardanelles 
12th July, 1915. 

W. J. RALSTON, 

Private, l/6th Battalion The High- 
land Light Infantry (T.). Killed' in 
action at the Dardanelles, 12th Julv 
1915. 



-69 



Hillhead High School 



J. RANKIN, 

Corporal, l/8th Battalion Princess 
Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders). Died of wounds, 3rd 
August, 1917. 



STEVEN D. REITH, D.C.M., B.Sc, 
Lieutenant, Indian Army Reserve of 
Officers. Killed in action, 20th 
September, 1918. 



E. H. RIBBECK, 

Private, The Highland Light In- 
fantry. Died of pneumonia at 
Gailes Camp Military Hospital, 2nd 
January, 1918. 



A. HOPE RICHMOND, 
Sub-Lieutenant, R.N.V.R., Anson 
Battalion, Royal Naval Division. 
Killed in action at the Dardanelles, 
4th June, 1915. 



W. J. ROBERTSON, 

Private, 13th (Scottish Horse) Bat- 
talion The Black Watch (Royal High- 
landers). Killed in action, 4th 
November, 1918. 



W. E. ROBINSON, 

Captain, 16th (Service) Battalion 
The Highland Light Infantry (2nd 
Glasgow). Killed in action, 18th 
November, 1916. 



W. RODGER, B.Sc, 
Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. Gassed, 
July, 1917; died of influenza, 1st 
November, 1918. 



T. ROURKE, 

Private, 10th Battalion The Lanca- 
shire Fusiliers. Died, 24th April, 
1920. 



J. RUSSELL, M.C., 

Captain, 17th Battalion The High- 
land Light Infantry. Died, 10th 
July, 1917. 

J. N. SANDERSON, 

Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery. 
Died of pneumonia, 17th October, 
1918. 



E. SCHONFIELD, 

Captain, 19th (County of London) 
Battalion The London Regiment (St. 
Pancras). Killed in action, 20th 
September, 1916. 

D. ROBERTSON SILLARS, 

Lieutenant (Acting Captain), 12th 
Battalion The Highland Light In- 
fantry. Killed in action, 4th June, 
1918. 



D. SINCLAIR, 

Lieutenant, The Highland Light 
Infantry and Royal Flying Corps. 
Killed in action, 18th December, 
1917. 



F. B. SINCLAIR, 

L. -Corporal, 6th Battalion The High- 
land Light Infantry. Died of pneu- 
monia, 28th February, 1919. 



G. H. SLOAN, 

Captain, 2nd Scottish Horse. Died 
at Gallipoli Peninsula on the 16th 
November, 1915, from wounds re- 
ceived on 9th November, 1915. 



G. EVANSTON SMITH, 

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion Princess 
Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders). Killed in action in 
France, 25th-26th September, 1915. 



70 



List of Fallen 



G. L. SOMMERVILLE, 

Captain, The King's Own (Royal 
Lancaster Regiment). Killed in 
action, 17th August, 1916. 



A. J. R. THOMSON, 

Corporal, 5th (Service) Battalion The 
Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 
Missing since 25th September, 1915. 



C. C. STEWART, 

Private, 17th (Service) Battalion The 
Highland Light Infantry (3rd Glas- 
gow). Killed in action, 1st July, 
1916. 



W. I. THOMSON, 

Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion The 
Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 
Died on 18th November, 1916, of 
wounds received in action. 



G. STEWART. M.A., 

Captain, 26th Battalion The North- 
umberland Fusiliers. Killed in 
action, 5th June, 1917. 



W. R. T. STEWART, 

Lieutenant, 9th (T.) Battalion Prin- 
cess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders). Killed in action, 6th 
August, 1916. 



A. M. STIRLING, 

Private, 16th (Service) Battalion The 
Highland Light Infantry (2nd Glas- 
gow). Died on service at Gailes, 
12th December, 1914. 



A. C. TAYLOR, 

2nd Lieutenant, 23rd Battalion The 
Northumberland Fusiliers (4th Tyne- 
side Scottish). Killed in action at 
Roeux, France, 29th April, 1917. 

J. K. TAYLOR, 

Private, 6th (City of Glasgow) Bat- 
talion The Highland Light Infantry 
(T.). Died of wounds received in 
France, 4th October, 1918. 

G C. THOMPSON, 

Private, 14th Battalion Princess 
Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders). Killed in action, 9th 
April, 1917. 



EMILE L. ROBERT-TISSOT, 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders). Died 
of wounds received in action, 12th 
April, 1918. 

J. U. ROBERT-TISSOT. 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders). Killed 
in action, 21st August, 1917. 

J. TODD, M.M., 

Sergeant, The Royal Scots (Lothian 
Regiment). Killed in action, 26th 
July, 1918. 

F. W. TURNER, 

2nd Lieutenant, 5th Battalion The 
Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Killed 
in action, 9th April, 1917. 

JACK TURNER, 

2nd Lieutenant, Tank Corps. Died 
at Cassel, Germany, on 13th April, 
1918, of wounds received in action 
22nd March, 1918. 

F. M'E. WATSON, 

2nd Lieutenant, Machine Gun Corps. 
Missing since 3rd May, 1917. 

M. S. WATSON, M.A.. 

2nd Lieutenant, 1st Battalion The 
Highland Light Infantry. Killed in 
action, 11th January, 1917. 



71 



Hillhead High School 



N. C. WATSON, 

2nd Lieutenant, 6th, attached 12th 
Battalion The Highland Light 
Infantry. Killed in action, 24th 
April, 1917. 

W. W. WATT, 

Private, 8th (Service) Battalion 

Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire 

Buffs, The Duke of Albany's). 

Wounded and missing, 25th Sep- 
tember, 1915. 



:. W. G. WEBSTER, 
Private, 4th Battalion The Gordon 
Highlanders. Killed in action, 23rd 
July, 1918. 



R. C. WILLIAMSON, 

L. -Corporal, 1/lst Scottish Horse. 
Died of wounds on board hospital 
ship, " Karapara," Dardanelles, 
14th December, 1915. 



S. De T. WILLIAMSON, 

2nd Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion The 
Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Killed 
in action in France, 12th March, 
1915. 



J. D. WILSON, 

Private, The Highland Light In- 
fantry, attached Machine Gun Corps. 
Killed in action, 13th April, 1918. 

O. WILSON, 

2nd Lieutenant, 5th (T.) Battalion 
The Prince of Wales's (North Stafford- 
shire Regiment), attached 2nd Bat- 
talion The York and Lancaster 
Regiment. Killed in action, 19th 
March, 1917. 

F. C. YOUDEN, 

Lieutenant, 15th Battalion Australian 
Infantry. Killed in action at the 
Dardanelles, 1915. 

E. COMLINE, 

Trooper, 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots 



Greys). 
1918. 



Killed in action, September, 



A. CURRIE, 

Driver, Australian Field Artillery. 
Accidently killed in France, 4th Dec- 
ember, 1917. 

A. R. STEWART, 

Lance-Corporal, 4th Battalion The 
Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 
Died 11th March, 1919. (Health 
impaired through service.) 



72 



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73 



Hillhead High School 




2nd Lieutenant Ramsay Allan, 

Royal Air Force. 



Sergeant R. F. Anderson, 

The Royal Fusiliers. 





Sergeant J. L. Armstrong, 

16th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 



Lieutenant A. A. M. Arnot, M.C. 

Royal Air Force. 



Portraits 





Lance=Corporal R. H. Arroll, 

Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs Tlie 
Duke of Albany's) 



Corporal H. M. Baillie, 

Machine Gun Corps. 



ft"' 





Sergeant J. H. H. Baird 

17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry 



Private J. Robertson Baird, 

Canadian Mounted Rifles. 



Hillhead High School 




2nd Lieutenant G. J. Balfour, 

6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry, 
attached to the Northumberland Fusiliers. 










Lance=Corporal J. Stanley Bone, 

Princess Louise's (Ar-vll and Sutherland High- 
landers), attached Machine Gun Corps. 




Lieutenant F H. BlacKie. 

Sth Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 



1 -4' ."■ 




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V 





2nd Lieutenant A. S. H. Bowie, 

Royal Garrison Artillery. 



76 



Portraits 




2nd Lieutenant C. T. Brown, jun., 

Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders). 



.JJdB M i ' - 

f " ^^^ 



tlf^X 




2nd Lieutenant Andrew M. Bruce. 

The Highland Light Infantry. 




2nd Lieutenant C. J. Bruce. 

Army Cyclist Corps. 




Lance=Corporal R. M. Burnie. 

9th (Glasgow Highland) Butt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 



Hillhead High School 





2nd Lieutenant George R Cairns,£M.A. 

3rd Lowland Division, R.F.A. 



Private Wm. K. Cameron, 

rth Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders. 




2nd Lieut. W. H. Cat 

6th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron Highlande 



Lieutenant A. M. Campbell, 

eaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, The 
Duke of Albany's). 



78 



Portraits 




Private A. S. Campbell, Private J. C. Campbell, 

5th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 5th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 





2nd Lieutenant J. N. Carpenter, M.C. Signaller A. Carswell. 

17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 

Light Infantry. 



Hillhead High School 




II m I 




Major J. S. Chalmers, B.L,, 

9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland Ligli 
Infantry. 



Lieutenant J. O. Chisholm, 

14th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 




Lieutenant R. C. Christison, B.Sc, 

10th Batt. The Gordon Highlanders. 



Captain M. Broadfoot ClarK, 

1st Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll ami Sutherland 
Highlanders). 



80 



Portraits 








Lieutenant E. M. Connell, 

Canadian Highlandera. 



Captain Daniel M'D. Cowie, 

The Highland Light Infantry. 





2nd Lieutenant W. Cowie, 

The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 



Lance=Corporal A. A. CruicKshanh, 

17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry 



Hilihead High Shcool 





2nd Lieutenant J. Hamilton Dichson, L.D.S. 

The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 



Private A. Cunningham. 

The Cameionians (Scottish Rifles), attached The 
Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 





2nd Lieutenant F. B. Davidson. 

6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 



Gunner J. DicR, 

Royal Garrison Artillery. 



82 



Portraits 





2ndiLieutenant W. G. Douglas, M.C., 

Royal Field Artillery. 



Lieutenant John Kent Dron 

The Highland Light Infantry, attached The King's 
Own .Scottish Borderers. 





Private D. Drummond, 

Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire ] 
The Duke of Albany's). 



Lance=Corporal G. C. Duffv 

78th Batt, Canadian Infantry. 



83 



Hillhead High School 




2nd Lieutenant H. S. A. Dunlop, 
Royal Air Force. 



Private Matthew Steel Dunlop, 

The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 





Private R. Dunlop, 

14th (County of London) Fatt. The London 
Regiment (London Scottish). 



Captain James Dunn, 

2nd Queen Victoria's Own Sappers and Miners 

(Indian Army). 



84 



Portraits 




.,.>*•■■• 




Private T. S. Dunn, 

5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 



Private T. M'D Ferguson, 

1st Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 




Private D. L. M"P. FlecK, 

41th Batt. Canadian Infantry. 



2nd Lieutenant W. Freer, 

Royal Air Force. 



85 



Hillhead High School 





2nd Lieutenant Eric A. Gordon, 

The Highland Light Infantry. 



Lance=Corporal Harry J. Graham, 

9th Batt, The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). 




Rifleman W. M. C. Hair. 

New Zealand Rifle Brigade. 



Captain D. S. Hall, M.C., 

Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) 
and Royal Flying Corps. 



Portraits 





Lieutenant Mat. W, Halley, 

Indian Army Reserve of Officers. 



Major J M. W. Halley, M.C. 

Eoyal Engineers. 




Private J. Hannah, 

The King's Own Scottish Borderers 



Captain G. M. Harley, 

12th Batt. The Highland Infantry. 



87 



Hillhead High School 





Captain J. A. Harper, M.C., M. 
M.B., Ch.B.. 

Royal Army Medical Corps. 



Private A. M. Hart, 

th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland Light 
Infantry. 





Private Roy D. Harvey, 

The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment), attached The 
Highland Light Infantry. 



Private G. R. Hay, I 

9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland Light 



88 



Portraits 













r 



Lieutenant J. Henry, 

Army Cyclist Corps. 



C.Q.M.S. R. W. Henry, 

16th Batt. Canadian Infantry (Canadian Scottish). 




Lieutenant J. D. Herbertson, 

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. 



Private H. JacK, 

:2th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 



Hillhead High School 




Corporal J. C. A. James. 

Honourable Artillery Company. 



I**? 




Sergeant D. R. F. Lamont, 

1st Batt. The Gordon Highlanders. 




Sergeant A. Lang, 

17th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 




Private Leon E. Levy, 

5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Riries). 



90 



Portraits 




2nd Lieutenant J. F. Logan, 

1st Batt. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 



Lieutenant P. A. E. M'CracKen, 

The Highland Light Infantry. 




Lieutenant Rev. C. Gordon Macdonald, M.A. 

Cth Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 



Captain A. MacDougall, 

8th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 



91 



Hillhead High School 




Signalman S. D. MacDougall, 

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, Clyde. 



Lieutenant G. C. M'Ewan, 

Royal Air Force. 





Private F. D. Maclnnes, 

31st Alberta Batt., Canadian Expeditionary Force. 



Private J. F. Maclnnes, 

2Sth Batt. Canadian Expeditionary Force. 



92 



Portraits 




2nd Lieutenant J. M'Intosh, 

Royal Garrison Artillery. 



Private Peter M'lntyre, 

Princess Louise's (Argyll ami Sutherland 
Highlanders). 





Lieutenant F. R. Mackenzie, 

2nd Batt. Seiforth Highlanders (Koss-shire Butts, 
The Duke of Albany's). 



Private R. C. Mackenzie, 

6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 



93 



Hillhead High School 



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2nd Lieutenant R. G. M'Kinlay, 
10th Batt. The Highland Light Infantr; 



Private G. A. C MacKinlay, M.A., 

5th Batt. The Cameronians (.Scottish Rifles). 




Bombardier M. M'Kini 

Royal Field Artillery. 



Private Alex. M'Lachlan, 

Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). 



94 



Portraits 




2nd Lieutenant J. MacLagan, B.Sc, 

Royal Engineers. 



Captain T. D. O. Maclagan, M.C. (Bai). 
Order of the Nile, 




Lance=Corporal R. G. A. MacLaren, 

6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 




Captain Alex. M. Maclean 

Royal Air Force. 



Hillhead High School 





1^ ' ^^»S 


h / %. fi| 


r^fcM 




2nd Lieutenant D. MacLean, 

Tlie I'aineroniaiis (Scottish Rifles). 



2nd Lieutenant W. A. MacLean, M.A. 

1st Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 





Captain R. Lindsay M'Mutrie, 

The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 



Corporal W. M'Neil, 

5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 



96 



Portraits 





Private A. F, Marshall, 

The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles 



Captain A. G. Marshall, 

7th Batt. The Highland Light Infantr 





Private W. Stanley Martin, 

The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 



Private F. T. Mather, 

16th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 



Hillhead High School 





Lance=Corporal A. Clifford Mechan. Engine=room Artificer J. A. Miller. 

5th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. Royal Naval Reserve. 




2nd Lieutenant J. M. Moir, M.A., 

1st Batt. The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). 



Lieutenant J. Mollison, 

Royal Air Force. 



Portraits 





Lieutenant J. Love Montgomerie, 

Singapore Volunteer Rifles. 



Lieutenant W. Allan Mollis 

Machine Gun Corps. 




Gunner W. M. Montgomerie. 

Royal Garrison Artillery. 



2nd Lieutentant W. Morland, 

The Highland Light Infantry, attached Trench 
Mortar Batteries. 



99 



Hillhead High School 





Engine=room Artificer J. H. G. Morrison, 

Royal Navy. 



Lieutenant J. I. Morrison, 

The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 



^ 



' 



: 



2nd Lieutenant J. S. Morrison, 

id Batt, The Caineronians (Scottish Rifle 




Private R. W Morrison, 

9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt, The Highland Light 



100 



Portraits 




Private J. T. Kingston Morton, 

7th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry 



'"1 



-* , • 




Engineer. Lieutenant J. Murray, B.Sc. 

Royal Navy. 







Captain F. Mottram, 

Royal Field Artillery. 




Private R. G. Murray. 

9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland 
Light Infantry. 



101 



«K (, 



f^% 



Hillhead High School 





Sapper W. H. Murray, Royal Engineers, Lance=Corpora! J. Nance. 

Expert in Demolitions to Admiralty. 5th Batt, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 




Lance=Corporal W. C. de Nance, Rev. R. H. Napier, B.D., 

5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Lieutenant, 4/lst Batt, King's African Rifles. 

102 



Portraits 





■ 



2nd Lieutenant J. T. Neilson, 

Sth Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 



Lance=Corporal G. Nelson. 

The King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). 




Lieutenant J. Nicolson, 

Royal Air Force. 



Captain S. H. Nimmo. 

The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 



103 



Hillhead High School 





Captain R. Osbourne, 

9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt, The Highland 
Light In l an try. 



Sergeant J. R. ParKer, 

rth Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 




Private S. S Picken, 

Machine Gun Corps. 




Lance=Corporal A. A. Ralston, 

1/Bth Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 



104 



Portraits 




Private W. J. Ralston, 

l/6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 



r> 



Lieutenant Steven D. Reith, D.C.M. 
B.Sc, 

Deoli Regiment. 




Corporal J. RanKin, 

l/8th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders). 




Private E. H Ribbeck, 

The Highland Light Infantry. 



105 



Hillhead High School 





Sub=Lieutenant J. A. Hope Richmond, 
R.N.V.R., Anson Batt., Royal Naval Division. 



Private W. J. Robertson, 

13th (Scottish Horse) Batt., The Black Watch 
(Royal Highlanders). 




kK 




ferWii 



Captain W. E. Robinson. 

16th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 



Lieutenant W. Rodger, B.Sc. 

Boyal Engineers. 



106 



Portraits 





Private T. RourKe. 
10th Batt. The Lancashire Fusiliers 



Gunner J. N. Sanderson, 

Royal Garrison Artillery. 





Captain E. Schonfield, 

19th (County of London) Batt. The London 
Regiment (St. Pancras). 



Captain D. R. Sillars. 

12th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 



107 



Hillhead High School 




Lieutenant D. Sinclair, 
The Highland Light Infantry and Royal Flying Corps 



Lance=Corporal F. B. Sinclair, 

6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 



Cf ' 





Captain G. H. Sloan, 

2nd Scottish Horse. 



Lieutenant G. Evanston Smith, 

Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 



108 



Portraits 





Captain G. L. Sommerville, 

The King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). 



Private C. C. Stewart, 

7th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 



1^1 




"V 



Captain G. Stewart, M.A., 

26th Batt. The Northumberland Fusiliers. 




Lieutenant W. R. T. Stewart, 

9th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders)^ 



109 



Hillhead High School 




Private A. M. Stirling, 
16th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 




2nd Lieutenant A, C. Taylor 

•23rd Batt. The Northumberland Fusili 




Private J. K. Taylor, 

6th Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 



Private G. C. Thompson, 

14th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlandeis). 



110 



Portraits 





Corporal A. J. R. Thomson, 

5th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders. 



2nd Lieutenant W. J. Thomson, 

3rd Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 




Private Emile L. Robert=Tissot, 

Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders). 



Private J. U. Robert=Tissot, 

Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders). 



Ill 



Hillhead High School 





Sergeant'J. Todd, M.M., 

The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 



2nd Lieutenant F. W. Turner, 

5th Batt. The Carneronians (Scottish Rifles). 




2nd Lieutenant Jack Turner, 

Tank Corps. 




2nd Lieutenant F. M'E. Watson, 

Machine Gun Corps. 



112 



Portraits 





2nd Lieutenant M. S. Watson. M.A., 

1st Batt. The Highland Light Infantry. 



2nd Lieutenant N. C. Watson. 

The Highland Light Infantry. 




Private W. W. Watt, 

8th Batt, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Burl's, 
The Duke of Albany's). 



Private R. W. G. Webster, 

4th Batt, The Gordon Highlanders. 



Hillhead High School 




2nd Lieutenant S. De T. Williamson 

2nd Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). 




^ance=Corporal R. C. Williamson, 

Scottish Horse. 





Lieutenant F, C. Youden, 

loth Batt. Australian Infantry. 



2nd Lieutenant O. Wilson, 

5th Batt. The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire 

Regiment), attached The York and Lancaster 

Regiment. 



114 



Portraits 




V 



Lance-Corporal A. R. Stewart, 

4th Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 




Driver A. Currie, 

Australian Field Artillt 



115 



BIOGRAPHIES 



Biographies 



RAMSAY ALLAN 

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Air Force 

Ramsay Allan, only son of Mr. Alex. W. Allan, manager of Kelvindale Paper 
Mills, was born on 2nd. April, 1894. Both his father and his mother were members 
of families long connected with Maryhill, the managership of the mills being 
hereditary for several generations in the Allan family, and his brother being a member 
of the Dawson family, well known to old residenters in the north-western district. 

Educated at Hillhead High School and Glasgow Academy, Ramsay served for 
a time in the Kelvinbridge branch of the Union Bank to learn business methods, 
and thereafter became assistant manager to his father in the paper mills. There he 
threw himself most enthusiastically into his work, showing such a grasp of technical 
details and developing such a power of command that in his father's absence he 
was left in sole charge. A destructive fire about eight years ago having necessitated 
the re-erection of the mills and the introduction of modern machinery, Ramsay's 
organising ability and mechanical skill were further developed, and marked him out 
as a worthy successor in the ancestral line of management. 

On the outbreak of war, though he might have sheltered himself under the 
badge system on the plea of war work, he applied for and obtained a commission 
in the Royal Flying Corps. After a period of training he proceeded to France. 
There he did suoh good work that he was several times commended by his CO. 
He was home on leave in the early days of March, 1918, and on his return to the 
Front found himself in the midst of the heaviest and most critical fighting of the 
war. He played a strenuous part in seeking to stem the German advance, and on 
the 22nd April, 1918, while out on a bombing expedition, his machine was struck 
by an anti-aircraft shell and crashed to earth, killing both pilot and observer 
within our own lines. His commanding officer writes — " I was in the air myself 
at the time, and shortly before had passed close by his machine at the height of 
about a mile, a cheery wave of the hand assuring me that they were then quite all 
right. The whole squadron is plunged into gloom at this misfortune, for your 
son was one of the most steady and reliable of pilots and an officer who could always 
be relied upon to do his work thoroughly ; needless to say, he was as a result popular 
with every one." Tall, resolute, manly, Ramsay Allan was regarded by all his 
friends as a youth with a great future before him. So indeed it proved, but in a 
very different sphere from any ever dreamed of by them. From first to last he 
played a gallant part, and though his time was but short, it contained more than 
" one crowded hour of glorious life." With the parents and sisters in their great 
sorrow we desire to express our heartfelt sympathy. 



R. F. ANDERSON 

Sergeant, The Royal Fusiliers 

The report of the death in action of Robert F. Anderson (better known as 
Bertie) caused profound sorrow in School circles, and justly so, as he had been 
associated with the School from his earliest years, and to the very last took a keen 
personal interest in all its activities. He was the youngest son of the late Mr. and 
Mrs. Anderson, Kelvin Drive, Glasgow. He was a leading member of the 1st 
Fifteen during season 1909-10. When he gave up playing he still followed the 
fortunes of the team with lively interest, and was usually to be found cheerino- 
them on from the touch-line. F or several years he acted as secretary of the School 

119 



Hillhead High School 



Club, and added greatly to its effectiveness and its membership. The present 
Headmaster remembers well how warm and sincere was the welcome Sergeant 
Anderson extended to him on his appointment when writing in his official capacity 
to congratulate him, and to assure him on behalf of all the old pupils of their 
constant support in every effort for the good of the School. This promise he and 
they have most generously redeemed. 

Several years ago he received an important appointment in London as shipping 
superintendent in Edward Lloyd's, Limited. There the great world upheaval found 
ih'im, and he was one of the first of our old boys to offer his services. He joined 
The Royal Fusiliers as a private, and surely never was soldier gayer than he. The 
hardship and privation of camp and field could do nothing to damp his spirits, 
and when he went to France he sent back the brightest and cheeriest of letters. 
Writing to the Headmaster a few days before the Big Push began, he says, " I 
shall be delighted to receive the School Magazine. In fact, anything connected 
with the School interests me immensely, so much so, in fact, that last month I 
got engaged to one of your old pupils." Sunt Jachryrruz rerum, et mentem mortalia 
tangunt. In the great advance of 15th July, 1916, he was leading his platoon when 
he was hit in the shoulder, but continued to press forward till, later in the day, he 
was shot through the head, death being instantaneous. An officer, writing to his 
sister, says, " He is a tremendous loss to the company; he was one of the best of 
non-commissioned officers. We greatly need men of his stamp at the moment." 
In Sergeant Anderson was found a rare combination of qualities — high spirits, 
bright wit, unfailing courtesy, and a high-souled integrity in every relation of life. 



JOHN L. ARMSTRONG 

Sergeant, 16th H.L.I. (2nd Glasgow) 

John L. Armstrong was the son of Mr. W. Armstrong, of Douglas and 
Armstrong's Temperance Hotel, and of Mrs. Armstrong, Woodbank, Bishopbriggs. 
When war began he was assisting his father in the conduct of his business. He 
joined the 16th H.L.I. at its formation, and as an old Volunteer was soon promoted 
sergeant. He was killed in France on 7th January, 1916, on the very day he was 
gazetted as second lieutenant in the Princess of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment). 
Major Kyle, in a letter to the bereaved parents, writes, " It may comfort you in 
your great loss to know that no sergeant in the battalion was held in higher esteem 
than your son. He had absolutely no fear. On a call for a night patrol to creep 
up to the German lines he was the first to volunteer." Equally emphatic testimony 
to Sergeant Armstrong's unflinching courage was borne by Major M'Ewan — " His 
behaviour in the trenches during a most trying period of duty was magnificent. His 
confident bearing did a great deal to keep up the spirits of the men when the stress 
of the long bombardment began to tell. We have lost a good comrade, a brave and 
fearless soldier, and all ranks join with me in expressing our deepest sympathy." 



ARTHUR ALISON MACDONALD ARNOT, M.C. 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force 

The death in action of Arthur A. M. Amot was a heavy blow to the School. 
For over eleven years he had gone out and in amongst us, and was greatly beloved 
and trusted by every one. He left us in session 1917, after obtaining his group 

120 



Biographies 



leaving certificate, to take a commission in the Royal Air Force. All through his 
course Arthur was accepted by his fellows as a natural leader, and his leading was 
ever healthy and helpful. He had a singularly clear and logical mind — a very rare 
quality in one of his years — exceptional power of concentration, and an indomitable 
will. In Rugby, cricket, and tennis he was always in the first flight, and his imper- 
turbable sang froid had a fin© steadying influence on a team. But, fond as he 
was of games, he had strong literary interests. He acted for a term as Editor 
and business manager of the School Magazine, and was an active member of the 
Literary Society. At Easter, 1917, he joined the Royal Flying Corps as a cadet, 
his high spirit and his natural aptitude alike impelling him to that service. He 
obtained his wings in record time, and was flying in France before some of those 
who started with him had finished their training. There he speedily proved his 
mettle, and was promoted Lieutenant. In February, 1918, he was home on 
short leave, looking the very picture of a self-possessed, resourceful, aerial pilot. 
He was soon back again at the Front, where he won fresh laurels. On the morning 
of 12th April he was informed that he had been awarded the Military Cross, and 
was recommended for promotion to flight commander. About six the same evening 
he set out on what proved his last flight. The story of it, as told by a Canadian 
observer, is moving almost to tears, and should thrill and inspire Hillhead boys 
for long years to come. It is unspeakably pathetic to think of the gallant boy 
being cut down with his hard-won honours still fresh upon him. His squadron 
commander writes — " He could have landed on the German side in safety at any 
time, but preferred to try and get home to being taken prisoner. Ever since your 
son joined me in November last he had done excellent work in the squadron, and 
deserved, and more than deserved, the recognition which in the last day was his." 

Lieutenant Arnot was the younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon A. Arnot, 
6 Dryburgh Gardens, Kelvinside. To all his School contemporaries the memory of 
Arthur Arnot will be a lasting and precious 



RICHARD HUBBARD ARROLL 

Lance-Corporal, Seaforth Highlanders 

Few old pupils had a wider range of friends than Dick Arroll, and the intimation 
of his death from wounds received in action aroused feelings of the deepest sorrow 
amongst them. He was beloved by all who knew him, and his breezy, genial presence 
will be long and gratefully remembered by the old boys of his time. All through 
life he was a keen sportsman, and was well known in athletic circles. He was 
specially interested in physical culture, and did much to advance the study and 
practice of that art long before physical training had become something like a 
fashion in our midst. When the war began he offered his services repeatedly, but 
unsuccessfully, to the War Office as instructor in gymnastics. Throughout the 
winter and spring of 191-4-15 he did splendid service by taking in hand the physical 
exercises of several units of the Citizens' Training Force, and amongst them that 
of our Former Pupils' Corps. No one who was privileged to attend Mr. Arroll's 
class in the gymnasium of Church Street Public School is likely to forget the 
devotion, skill, and geniality of the instructor. He was himself one of the hardest 
of workers, and never asked the class to go through an exercise without sharing 
in it himself. Then, when the serious exercises were over, what a dance " Dickie " 
led the members round the gymnasium, doubling here and circling there in a giddy 
maze, till even the youngest and strongest were fain to cry out, " Hold, enough.'*' 



Hillhead High School 



In 1916, unable to secure a post as instructor, he joined the Seaforth Highlanders, 
and proceeded to France early in the present year. On the 15th May, 1917, he was 
severely wounded, and brought to New End Hospital, Hampstead. There he made 
for a time good progress, but complications set in, and he passed away on the 24th 
August, 1917. The deepest sympathy is felt for Mrs. Arrol and her three young 
children. 

HAROLD MONTAGUE BAILLIE 

Corporal, 175th Company, Machine Gun Corps 

Harold Montague Baillie was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. James Baillie, 
12 Wilson Street, Hillhead. At School he was always in the hist flight, and carried 
off many prizes, especially in mathematics. His was a refined, sensitive nature, 
and his tastes did not lie towards athletics and games, but rather to books and 
music, of which he was passionately fond. His strong but reserved character, his 
obliging disposition, and his perfect reliability in word and deed made a marked 
impression on all his teachers. On leaving School he entered the office of Messrs. 
Burrell &. Son, shipowners. There his promotion was rapid, and his early death 
was greatly mourned by his employers, who testified to the high regard in which 
he was held by all the members of the staff. Each winter he attended educational 
and musical classes, and for two years he acted as pianist in Kelvin Street Mission 
Sabbath School. He had a high sense of duty, and when war broke out he expressed 
his intention of joining as soon as he was of age. When that time came he enlisted 
in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, but was soon transferred to the Machine 
Gun Corps. He went to France with his unit in March, 1917, with the rank 
of corporal. There he proved himself to be a devoted, staunch, and faithful soldier. 
On the morning of 26th September, 1917, while advancing into action in the 
neighbourhood of Polygon Wood he was struck by a piece of shrapnel, and died 
immediately. His lieutenant wrote, " Corporal Baillie's death is most deeply 
felt throughout the company. He was a gallant gentleman, who fought and died 
for the land we love so well." That is a true and beautiful epitaph for Harold 
Baillie, and to it need only be added that he was a loving and devoted son and 
brother and a faithful and loyal friend. 



JAMES HENRY HUGH BAIRD 

Sergeant, 17th Battalion H.L.I. 

James H. H. Baird, the third son of Mr. and Mrs. Baird, 36 Sutherland 
Terrace, Hillhead, was regarded by his teachers as a singularly reliable and upright 
pupil. He was also a diligent and conscientious student, and was ever a leader 
among his schoolfellows. He was keenly interested in all forms of sport, and there 
were few in which he did not excel. On leaving School he joined the firm of 
Alexander & Mair, shipowners, Glasgow. His advance there was rapid, and by the 
time he was nineteen years of age he was a member of the " Room." On the 
outbreak of war he joined the Former Pupils' Training Corps, and proved to be one 
of its most active and efficient members. In May, 1915, he enlisted in the 17th 
H.L.I. , the Chamber of Commerce Battalion. Tall, broad-shouldered, athletic, he 
looked the soldier every inch, and no one who knew him was surprised at his rapid 
promotion. In a few months he passed through the various grades of non-com- 
missioned rank, and was recommended by his colonel for a commission. His papers 

122 



Biographies 



were signed and ready to be sent in when, on the 18th November, 1916, he was 
seen to fall at the head of his men during an attack on the German lines. He was 
at first reported wounded and missing, but later evidence went to show he had been 
killed. Thus pass in a halo of glory our bravest and best, but their example 
remains to inspire and cheer. James Baird was a devoted son and a loving brother, 
and the tenderest sympathy of the School goes out to his widowed mother and 
brothers and sisters. 



JOHN ROBERTSON BAIRD 

Private, Canadian Mounted Rifles 

Private John Robertson Baird was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 
Baird, Winnipeg, Canada. He received all his education at Hillhead High School, 
and, until he left for Canada with his parents in 1905, was an ardent member of the 
Cadet Corps. After a short period of training in a bank in Winnipeg he joined his 
father in the commission business. When the world war began he joined the 1st 
Canadian Mounted Rifles and arrived at Shomcliffe for training in June, 1915. 
Soon after he proceeded to France, and spent that terrible winter in the trenches 
round Ypres. There in the fierce fighting that raged in the month of June round 
Sanctuary Wood and Hooge Farm the whole of the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles 
were practically wiped out, and Private Baird was amongst the fallen. Owing to 
the fight raging for weeks and there being so few survivors the exact date of death 
has not been ascertained. Some time after the parents of this gallant soldier 
received a letter from a German soldier saying that while occupying the old trenches 
of the Canadian Mounted Rifles he had found Private Baird 's Bible, and offering to 
send it to them if they so wished. Needless to say, they have gratefully accepted 
the offer, which goes to prove that the German nature is not altogether bad. Private 
Baird dearly loved his adopted land, and was loud in its praises, but responded at 
once in the hour of his native country's need. We have a specially warm place in 
our heart for these heroes from afar. 



GEORGE J. BALFOUR 

2nd Lieutenant, 6th Battalion H.L.I. 

The younger son of Mr. Andrew Balfour, F.R.I.B.A., architect, Glasgow, 
and Mrs. Balfour, Rostrevor, Bridge of Weir, Lieutenant George J. Balfour was 
educated at Hillhead High School and Glasgow High School. On leaving School 
he entered the service of Messrs. Nobels, Limited. On the outbreak of war, though 
he was only seventeen years of age, he joined the 6th H.L.I, as a private, and after 
twelve months' service he was granted a commission in his own regiment — a rare 
and signal honour and a high tribute to his worth. In July, 1916, he proceeded to 
the Front on active service, and was attached to the Northumberland Fusiliers. 
He saw much fierce fighting, and fell in action at the head of his men on the 15th 
September, 1916, when the British captured Flers, Martenpuich, Courcelette, and 
High Wood. The colonel of the regiment, in a letter to Lieutenant Balfour's parents, 
writes, " I am very sorry that the continuous fighting in which we have been 
engaged has prevented me writing you sooner to convey to you my own deepest 
sympathy, and that of every officer and man in my regiment, in your great loss. 
Your son fell gallantly leading his men in an attack in which they did magnificently, 

123 



Hillhead High School 



and it will be some little consolation to you to know that his life was not sacrificed 
in vain. He is buried on the battlefield where he fell. He was an excellent officer, 
and beloved by all of us, and we shall miss him very much and share your sorrow." 



FRANK HERNDON BLACKIE 

Lieutenant, The Cameronians, attached 1st King's African Rifles 

Lieutenant Frank Herndon Blackie was the youngest son of Mr. John J. 
Blackie, 24 Hamilton Park Terrace, W. On leaving School he entered the employ- 
ment of Messrs. Hodge & Smith, chartered accountants, Glasgow. While keenly 
interested in his work, he found time to pursue his favourite recreations, drawing, 
sketching, country expeditions on foot or bicycle, and swimming. He was also 
for several years a member of the Hillhead Company of the Glasgow Highlanders. 
On the declaration of war in 1914 he at once rejoined his old regiment and went 
with the 1st Battalion to France in November of the same year. He came safely 
over the privations and dangers of the first year's campaign and in September, 1915, 
he was granted a commission in the 8th Scottish Rifles, and returned to this country 
to train. In the autumn of 1916, in response to an appeal for volunteers for service 
in East Africa, he offered himself. He was accepted, and posted to the 1st King's 
African Rifles, joining his regiment at Zamba in the beginning of 1917. In May of 
that year, while engaged on a recruiting expedition in Portuguese East Africa, he 
was taken prisoner by a German raiding force, and remained in their hands till 
he was released by the British in November of the same year. Lieut. Blackie 
during his captivity kept a diary, which he sent home. It gives a vivid and inter- 
esting account of his experiences, and shows the Huns in East Africa in a much 
more favourable light than those of the Fatherland. It is hoped to publish extracts 
from the diary in the Magazine from time to time. Lieut. Blackie was killed in 
action on the 11th April, 1918, while in command of a machine gun in a bush 
fight near Kariva, Portuguese East Africa. Lieut. Frank W. Blackie was the second 
of his family to fall in the great cause. His elder brother, Captain A. F. Blackie, 
16th H.L.I. , died in France from wounds received in action on 17th April, 1917, 
aged thirty-seven. Parr nobile fratrum. 



JOHN STANLEY BONE 

Lance-Corporal, A. & S. Highlanders attached Machine Gun Corps 

Lance-Corporal Stanley Bone was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bone, 
11 Balmoral Gardens, Monkseaton, Northumberland. His School career was rather 
remarkable. He had no capacity for book knowledge or abstract reasoning; all 
his talents lay along the lines of action and practical work. In all his classes he 
was the natural leader. He did not bully or hustle, and teachers sometimes 
wondered what exactly was the secret of his power. I think it lay in this. He 
ruled all because he served all. When anything had to be done Stanley did it. 
When any one required help Stanley was there to give it. He was an ardent Cadet 
and Scout, and took a leading part in all School games. On leaving School he 
entered the employment of Messrs. W. S. Miller & Co., shipbrokers, where he gave 
promise of becoming a shrewd and alert man of business. When sixteen years of 
age, he tried to enlist, but his youth was too obvious to even the most willingly 
gullible of recruiting sergeants. Later he joined the Glasgow University O.T.C., 

124 



Biographies 



but proceeded to France as a private in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. 
Big, strapping, powerful, he was a striking figure in his Highland dress. His 
career in France was brief. After a short period in the trenches he was sent to the 
Base Hospital suffering from some form of blood poisoning. Then pneumonia super- 
vened, and on the 18th of June, 1918, the gallant Stanley passed away. His own 
wish doubtless would have been to fall at the head of his section in one wild dash 
upon the enemy, but Bis (Miter visum. His platoon commander, writing home, 
said — " He was a good soldier in the best sense of the term, and when he joined the 
section I soon found his sterling qualities and made him a N.C.O. In fact, he created 
a record by becoming one so quickly. I also spoke to him about sending him 
home for a commission after a little more experience in the line." His old School- 
fellows will not readily forget this gallant soldier and kindly, considerate, cheerful 
comrade. 



ALLAN STUART HUNTER BOWIE 

2nd Lieutenant, R.G.A. 

Second Lieutenant Allan S. H. Bowie, the only son of Mrs. Bowie, 16 Eton 
Place, Glasgow, W., is remembered at School as an exceptionally thoughtful, 
studious, earnest pupil. He had from first to last a high sense of duty, and has 
left behind a fine record of unselfish and devoted service to many worthy causes. 
For several years he was an active member of the Cadet Corps, and an enthusiastic 
Scout. He continued his connection with the latter movement long after he left 
School, and for seven years acted as scoutmaster in the 1st Glasgow Troop. He 
was devoted to his boys, who, in turn, looked on him with admiration and affection, 
many of them corresponding with him to the last. He took a deep interest in Church 
work, and the Christian Endeavour movement had in him one of its strongest sup- 
porters. He was a member of several literary societies, and had a cultured and 
discriminating taste in literature. In civil life he was for several years in the coal 
exporting trade in Glasgow, but some time ago he transferred to the same business 
in Hull. War and strife were hateful to his whole nature, and only a high and 
compelling sense of duty made him join the Army. He served for a time with the 
Hull Artillery Volunteers, and later transferred to the Artist Rifles. In 1916 he 
was recommended for a commission, and, after a period in a training school, he 
was attached to the Royal Garrison Artillery. In August, 1917, he proceeded to 
France. There he did his duty in the thorough, systematic, whole-hearted manner 
that characterised all his actions. On the 9th May, 1918, he was killed in action 
during the furious fighting that marked the German advance. Many notable 
testimonies to his gallantry, resolution, and unselfishness have been received from 
the officers and men of his regiment. To his widowed mother, whose only child 
he was, the heartfelt sympathy of the School is extended. 



CHARLES TOLME BROWN 

2nd Lieutenant, A. & S. Highlanders 

Second Lieutenant Charles T. Brown was the younger son of Mr. C. T. Brown, 
23 Annfield Road, Partickhill, and 75 Buchanan Street, Glasgow, and grandson of 
the late Provost George Brown of Irvine. At School he was noted for his straight- 

125 



Hillhead High School 



forward bearing and his refined kindly nature. He was an eager cadet, and on 
leaving School joined the 5th Scottish Rifles as a private. In civil life he was in 
the service of Arthur & Co., Limited, Queen Street, but in December of 1915, as 
soon as he was of age, he was given a commission in the Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders, and proceeded to France in the following autumn. The hardships of 
trench warfare in winter could not break his bright and cheerful spirit, and he 
" carried on " without grumbling to the end. On the 17th March, 1917, while, 
in the words of his colonel," leading his men in a gallant and splendid way," he 
was shot down just at the enemy's wire. His company commander wrote, " Charlie 
was a brave young officer, a gallant leader, and beloved by his men. He had been 
with me since he came out to France, and was a great favourite of mine. We now 
mourn the loss of a dear friend and brother officer." Second Lieutenant Brown 
was only nineteen years of age, but in that short space he has given an example of 
devotion and self-sacrifice that will ever be chei-ished by his friends and old school- 
fellows. 



ANDREW MOFFAT BRUCE 

2nd Lieutenant, Glasgow Highlanders 

Second Lieutenant Andrew Moffat Bruce was the youngest son of Dr. R. Wilson 
Bruce, 5 Rosebery Terrace, Glasgow. He was one of five brothers, all of whom gave 
prompt and willing answer to the call for men. Two of them have joined the glorious 
host of the unreturning brave, Lieutenant Charles James in Palestine and Andrew in 
France. Clean-minded and generous-hearted, as boy and man he made friends wher- 
ever he went. Like his brothers, he was keenly interested in swimming, and was an 
active member of the Arlington Baths. On leaving School he entered the office of 
Messrs. Adam Brown & Co., iron and steel merchants, Oswald Street, Glasgow. Though 
there but a short time, his keenness, uprightness, and good sense greatly commended 
him to his employers. Though only seventeen years of age, he at once enlisted 
in the Glasgow Highlanders. Too young to go to France, he was for over eighteen 
months in various camps in this country. In 1916 he went on active service, but 
after a period in the trenches he was invalided home with trench feet. When he 
recovered he was sent for training to a Cadet Battalion, and at the close obtained 
the coveted distinction of being offered a commission in his old Battalion. He 
returned to France in April, 1918, and passed safely through much heavy 
fighting. He was joyfully looking forward to leave when, in the great advance of 
29th September, 1918, he was killed in action. His Colonel writes — " He was a 
splendid officer. Full of enthusiasm and keen in his duties ; he was a perfect 
inspiration to his platoon, and he lost his life while gallantly leading them in the 
attack last Sunday." Further particulars are given by the Padre, who says — " The 
Battalion was in action early on Sunday morning, and Andy didn't come in.- We 
found him shot through the head on a green slope at the head of his men, who had 
been caught by machine gun fire. The whole battalion sends deepest sympathy. 
Your laddie had done extremely well, was trusted by the men and the Colonel, and 
was most popular with his fellow-officers. Andy was always a most charming boy 
to me, and I can understand a little how you will miss him." He is laid to rest 
near Villers Guislain — together with two brother-officers and eighty of their men. 
The deepest sympathy of the School is extended to his father, brothers, and sisters, 
who are thus for the second time bereaved. 

126 



Biographies 



CHARLES JAMES BRUCE 

2nd Lieutenant, Army Cyclist Corps 

Charles James Bruce was the third son of Dr. R. Wilson Bruce, and was one 
of five sons serving with the colours. At School he took a high place, and showed a 
marked capacity for mathematics and science. On leaving School he chose insurance 
as his life work, and made rapid progress in his profession. At the outbreak of 
war he was an inspector of the Scottish Widows' Life Assurance Society. When the 
great world struggle began Charles Bruce, known to his friends as " Clunk," was 
one of the first to answer the call. He rejoined his old regiment, the Glasgow 
Highlanders, and went with them to France as corporal in November, 1914. In 
May, 1915, he was wounded at Festubert. Making a good recovery, he was given 
a commission in the Army Cyclist Corps, and proceeded to Egypt in May, 1916. 
He came safely through the battles of Romani and Gaza, but immediately after the 
latter he contracted dysentery. His commanding officer writing to his own people 
lights up the closing scenes in the life of this gallant officer, " There is very sad 
news about Bruce. He took ill with dysentery, and was in a field hospital behind 
the lines. The second night he was there Fritz came over and bombed the hospital, 
and let off his machine gun. Bruce was badly wounded in ten places, but was 
moved down the line, and ultimately got the length of Cairo. Some days ago I 
heard he was out of danger, but I have now learned that he succumbed to his wounds 
three days later, on 21st May, 1917. I feel it very much, as he was such a fine 
fellow, so cheery, and one you could entirely depend upon to do the very best, no 
matter how trying the circumstances. He did so well also during the fighting." 
The officer now in command of the company writes, " I have had no officer who was 
so popular and well liked by the men, and all the officers and many of the men 
found him a sincere friend." Many fine tributes have been paid to " Clunk," but 
one of the finest was the devotion shown to him by his batman, who refused to 
leave his side till he died. No one who knew " Clunk " will be surprised at this; 
a big-hearted fellow himself, he called forth the best in all who were around him. 

ROY MACLEAN BURNIE 

Lance-Corporal Glasgow Highlanders 

The elder son of Mr. Robert Burnie, photograher, 86 Woodlands Road, Lance- 
Corporal Roy Burnie was a member of the first Cadet Corps formed in connection 
with the School. He had a passion for music, which formed almost his only 
recreation. He was for years a student at the late Mr. Macbeth's College of Music, 
and was later a prominent member of the Lyric Operatic Club, and had usually 
a leading part in the operas presented by them. Early in the war he joined the 
Glasgow Highlanders, and, after a somewhat tedious time of training, he proceeded 
to France a year ago. He came safely through the first stages of the Big Push, but 
was killed in action on 1st November, 1916, during a successful attack on the 
German lines. Lance-Corporal Burnie was a man of strong and attractive per- 
sonality, and will be long mourned by all who knew him. He was twenty-eight 
years of age. 

GEORGE R, CAIRNS, M.A. 

2nd Lieutenant, 3rd Lowland Division, Royal Field Artillery 

Second Lieutenant Cairns, who was twenty-one years of age, was the youngest 
son of Police Inspector James Cairns and Mrs. Cairns, Hillhead. After a full course 

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at Hillhead High School, he entered Glasgow University, and graduated M.A. 
immediately before enlisting. He was the only member of his battery to be sent 
to Gallipoli, and was there only a few days when he was mortally wounded, and 
died on 4th January, 1916. He was a most enthusiastic Rugby player, and won 
several prizes for running. He took a keen interest in the School games, and was 
frequently to be seen at the Rugby matches advising and encouraging the juniors. 
His was a singularly charming and attractive personality, and he will be long mourned 
by all who knew him. 



WALDO HASTIE CAMERON 

2nd Lieutenant, 6th Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 

Second Lieutenant Waldo H. Cameron was the youngest son of the late Mr. 
Robert Wilson Cameron, of John Cameron & Son, Greenock, and of Mrs. Cameron, 
53 Lawrence, Place, Partick. He was educated at Hillhead High School, where his 
sunny nature and lovable disposition made him one of the most popular of pupils. 
He was an original member of the Cadet Corps, and this early training may be said 
to have given direction to his whole after-life. Second Lieutenant Cameron had a 
high sense of duty and a passion for service. He was for years an active member 
and officer of the 32nd Company of the Boys' Brigade, and to the last followed the 
fortunes of his old boys with the keenest interest. Like many other Hillhead School 
cadets, he joined B Company of the 6th H.L.I. , and rose to the rank of sergeant. 
On the outbreak of war he, like a true Cameron, enlisted under Lochiel, and though 
offered a commission in another regiment he preferred to serve in the ranks under 
the chief of his clan. At the battle of Loos, where the Camerons covered themselves 
with glory, he was wounded and invalided home. In July, 1916, he was offered a 
commission in the 6th Camerons, and joined his regiment in France towards the 
close of the year. Early in March, 1917, he was wounded a second time, but 
soon rejoined his battalion. On the 11th April, 1917, the Camerons advanced 
across a field swept by machine guns to capture the village of Monchy. Waldo took 
a leading part in this attack, which has been described as one of the most glorious 
incidents in that advance. According to his commanding officer, he fell during 
the hottest part of the fight doing his duty in the bravest and most gallant manner. 
Thus in death as in life he fought a gbod fight and kept the faith. 



WILLIAM K. CAMERON 

Private, 7th Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 

The only son of Mr. William Cameron, lately headmaster of Dowanhill Public 
School, Private Cameron was born in 1887. He adopted a business career, and 
several years ago he went to West Africa to a post in a bank. When the war broke 
out he, like so many more, hurried home, and at once joined the 7th Camerons, 
which was then being raised. He was in the immortal charge of that famous 
regiment at Loos, 25th September, 1915, and fell early in the battle. A quiet, 
reserved, high-principled young man, he was greatly beloved by all who knew 
him. He, like all others who came from distant lands to the help of the Motherland, 
deserves a specially generous meed of praise. 

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ALAXANDER MATHER CAMPBELL 

Lieutenant, Seaforth Highlanders 

Lieutenant Alexander M. Campbell was the only son of Mr. A. M. Campbell, 
115 Roselea Drive, Dennistoun. All his School days were spent in Hillhead High 
School, and his interest in it never flagged. He had about him a singular charm 
of manner, and no one could look into his clear, steady eyes without feeling that 
here was one incapable of an ungenerous thought or an unworthy act. He joined 
the Cadet Corps as soon as he was of age, and remained one of its keenest members 
till he left it in 1914 for more serious service. In July, 1911, he was one of the 
Cadets chosen to represent the School at the great Review by the King at Windsor. 
In December, 1914, he enlisted as a private in the Seaforth Highlanders, although 
he had gained his " A " certificate in the O.T.C., and might well have looked for 
a commission. His Cadet training stood him in good stead in his new sphere, and 
he was very soon promoted sergeant. His officers repeatedly urged him to apply 
for a commission, but he steadily refused till he had experience of actual warfare 
in France. In the summer of 1916 he had his wish, and proved himself a gallant 
soldier and a resourceful leader. In February he came home to take a commission, 
and was back again in France in the autumn attached to his old regiment. Early 
in March of this year he was home on leave, and, as usual, paid a visit to his old 
School. Every one was then struck by his tall, lithe, handsome figure and his 
gallant bearing. Two weeks later, on the 22nd March, 1918, he fell in action 
near Arras. His commanding officer writes — " We are all terribly sorry about it. 
He was always so keen in everything and so cheerful. He took an immense amount 
of pains over everything he did, and was a first-rate officer. I remember on one 
occasion finding him completely buried by a shell. He was being dug out, and was 
looking pretty bad when I arrived. But he assured me he was all right, and only 
wanted to know how it fared with the men who were buried with him." 



JAMES COLIN CAMPBELL 

Private, 5th Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 

ALEX. STRACHAN CAMPBELL 

Private, 5th Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 

These two gallant brothers, the only sons of Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Campbell, 
175 Byres Road, were among the first to answer the call of King and country. In 
life they were deeply attached to one another, and in death they were not greatly 
divided. On the fateful 25th September, 1915, both brothers took part in the 
attack on the German lines at Loos. The fighting was severe and bitter, and at 
the close of the day the elder brother, James C. Campbell, was reported missing. 
The following day, Sunday, 26th, was spent by Alexander in searching over the 
battlefield for his much-loved brother. A comrade, Private Gordon Eccles, writes 
that Alexander came upon him wounded and unable to move, and carried him on 
his back for a distance of two miles to a dressing station. That is the last glimpse 
we get of this faithful brother and unselfish friend. On the 27th the Camerons 
once more advanced to the attack, and Private Alexander S. Campbell did not answer 
the evening roll call. They were months later officially reported by the War Office, 

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" Missing, supposed killed." The heartfelt sympathy of the whole School goes 
out to the parents, thus doubly bereaved. 

Both brothers were popular and enthusiastic members of the Former Pupils' 
Rugby Club, and their early death is mourned by a wide circle. 



JOHN NEILSON CARPENTER, M.C 
2nd Lieutenant, 17th Battalion The Highland Light Infantry 

Second Lieutenant John Neilson Carpenter, the younger son of the late Mr. 
Thomas F. Carpenter and Mrs. Carpenter, 36 Falkland Mansions, Hyndland, was born 
in 1894. He was educated at Hillhead High School, Glasgow Academy, and Glasgow 
University. His quiet, unassuming manner and his generous nature, together with 
his prominence in the class room and his prowess in the field of sport, made him a 
favourite with all his schoolfellows. His outstanding ability in Mathematics and 
Science pointed to engineering as a suitable sphere of activity, and he became 
indentured with Messrs. Yarrow & Co., Scotstoun. 

In August, 1914, he, along with so many others of his companions and school- 
mates, joined the Chamber of Commerce Battalion as a private. There he soon 
distinguished himself, and had the honour of being awarded a commission in his 
own battalion. With them he proceeded to France in November, 1915. On the 
23rd April, 1916, his company carried out a singularly successful raid upon the 
German trenches, taking back with them many prisoners and several machine guns. 
For conspicuous gallantly in this raid and for showing great dash in hand-to-hand 
fighting, Lieutenant Carpenter was awarded the Military Cross. For gallantry 
and successful leading in the same action, Sergeant-Major Steven Reith, an old 
schoolfellow, was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Lieutenant Carpenter 
was killed in action on the 1st July, 1916, in an attack upon the Leipzig Redoubt, 
an occasion which was fatal for so many of our old boys. Lieutenant Carpenter, 
strong, athletic, fearless, was not only an excellent soldier, but looked the part. 
His men were all deeply attached to him, and greatly mourned his death. 



ARCH. CARSWELL 

Signaller, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Battalion, HX.I. 

Signaller Archie Carswell was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Arch. Carswell, 
78 Albert Road, Crosshill. He was educated at Hillhead High School, and on leaving 
entered the office of the Clan Line, transferring later to that of Messrs. Glen & 
Co., shipowners, St. Vincent Street. There his unfailing cheeriness, good nature, 
and unselfishness made him a general favourite. His principal, Mr. Glen, writing 
to Mrs. Carswell, says, " I could not fail to admire the straightforward and earnest 
manner in which he undertook all his duties." It was in this same spirit of earnest- 
ness that he heard and answered the call to service at an early stage in the war. 
After a period of training at Catterick he crossed to France in December of 1916. 
On the 21st of May, 1917, during an attack on the Hindenburg line he was wounded 
in the hand by shrapnel, and went down to the dressing station to have it bandaged. 
While there he found many serious cases coming steadily in, and he stood aside that 
they might be attended to first. It was while waiting thus that he was struck by 
a piece of shell, and died a short time later at the casualty clearing station. This 
act of self-forgetfulness which led to his death was quite characteristic of his whole 

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life. He was ever proud to serve others. He was a member of South Shawlands 
U.F. Church, took an active part in the Y.M.C.A., and was secretary of the Sabbath 
school. 

J. S. CHALMERS, B.L. 

Major, 9th H.LJ. (Glasgow Highlanders) 

Major John S. Chalmers joined the School soon after it was opened and left 
to begin his apprenticeship to law. Like so many of his contemporaries he remained 
to the last deeply attached to his old School, and the headmaster had several letters 
from him in which he showed that he kept in touch with all its doings. He was an 
enthusiastic Rugby player and was one of the original members of the Former Pupils' 
1st XV. He played many fine games for his side, and was specially prominent in 
attack. He was also a first-class golfer, and acted for a time as Secretary of Cardross 
Golf Club. Soon after completing his apprenticeship he started in business for 
himself as a law agent, but found time also to join the Glasgow Highlanders as a 
commissioned officer. When war began he was mobilised with his battalion and 
went to France in November, 1914. No one who passed through the first winter 
in the trenches will ever forget the experience. Trying as the following years were, 
they were almost picnics compared with the winter of 1914. Major Chalmers came 
seemingly unharmed through the worst of it, but when home on leave he had a serious 
illness which kept him at home for a long time. When he recovered he was appointed 
to raise, train, and command a company of divisional cyclists. In August, 1917, he 
returned to France to his old battalion, and came safely through the terrific trials 
that marked the autumn of that year. During the critical days of April, 1918, when 
the Germans were making their final effort for the possession of the Channel ports, 
the Glasgow Highlanders played a heroic part in stemming the onset. They held 
part of the line between Bailleul and Neuve Eglise, and there while commanding the 
advanced company Major Chalmers was struck by a shell and killed instantaneously. 
By his contemporaries he will always be remembered for his fine qualities of leader- 
ship, which found a wider field for their exercise than he or they ever dreamed of. 



JOHN OLIVER CHISHOLM 

Lieutenant, 14th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) 

Lieutenant John 0. Chisholm, the only son of Dr. John 0. Chisholm, 15 Windsor 
Terrace, was born in Glasgow in October, 1896. He was educated at Hillhead High 
School and Allan Glen's. At School he was noted for his joyous nature, fine courtesy, 
and steady application. He was an enthusiastic member of the 1st Glasgow Company of 
Boy Scouts, and after he left School much of his leisure was devoted to the movement. 
Like so many more of our School pupils, he had a boundless admiration for the Scout- 
master, Captain Young, one of the pioneers of the movement, and still " going 
strong." On leaving School he began his apprenticeship as an engineer with Messrs. 
Smith & Sons, Possil Engine Work, and was in his second year when war broke out. 
Loyalty and service were the keynotes in his character, and it was but natural there- 
fore that he should throw aside his career and offer himself for service as a Scout in 
Maryhill Barracks and the camp at Scotstoun. When he came of age he joined the 
O.T.C. of Glasgow University, and soon obtained a commission in The Royal Scots. 
Like so many more who have fallen, he was a soldier only from duty, not at all from 
choice. His refined and sensitive nature revolted at the whole ghastly tragedy, but 

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he found in an absorbing sense of duty the inspiration and strength to play his part 
right manfully. At the first Battle of the Somme he was wounded and was for some 
months in Yorkhill Hospital. He returned to France in May, 1918. His battalion 
was one of those sent to aid the French at a critical stage in the second Battle of the 
Marne. There on the 23rd July, 1918, he fell at the head of his men with the know- 
ledge that victory was already assured. The French General has paid a magnificent 
tribute to the splendid gallantry of these British troops, who were the first to stay 
the onset of the advancing Germans. It should be some slight consolation to those 
nearest and dearest to him that he fell in the full tide of victory, and that his sacrifice 
was not in vain. 

ROBERT C. CHRISTISON, B.Sc, 

Lieutenant, 10th Battalion The Gordon Highlanders 

The eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. George Christison, 2 Kelvinside Gardens, 
Robert C. Christison (better known as " Bertie "), received his education in 
Hiilhead High School and Glasgow University. At School he took a leading part 
in athletics, winning many medals and other trophies in the various departments of 
sport. He was captain of the Rugby team and a sergeant in the Junior Officers' 
Training Corps. He was deeply attached to his old School, and devoted much 
of his leisure to forwarding its interests. He was for a time secretary, and after- 
wards president, of the Literary Club, which flourished greatly under his genial 
rule. But his interests were many-sided, and the Rugby, tennis, and swimming 
sections were all much strengthened by his support. On leaving School he entered 
Glasgow University, where he graduated as Bachelor of Science in Engineering. 
Soon after war began he was given a commission in the 10th Gordons. Lieutenant 
Christison was the beau-ideal of a soldier. Tall, broad-shouldered, athletic, he was 
a striking figure in his waving tartan. At Loos, on 25th September, 1915, owing 
to the illness of his captain, he led his company into battle, and was last seen on 
the slopes of Hill 70 wounded while gallanty rallying his men. His commanding 
officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Wallace, wrote regarding him, " I thought so highly 
of your son and his qualities of leading that I specially selected him for promotion. 
He was doing a captain's duties, and commanded his company at the Battle of Loos 
and the taking of Hill 70. I have the highest possible opinion of your son as a 
man and as an officer, and the suspense about his fate is a great personal distress 
to me and to every one, for he was universally popular." 

MARCUS BROADFOOT CLARK 

Acting Captain, 1st Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders 

Marcus Broadfoot Clark was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Allan Clark, 
Violet Villa, Cathcart, and late of Severn Villa, Innellan. A native of Dennistoun, 
he attended Hiilhead High School from 1901 to 1905, and Glasgow High School 
from 1905 to 1911. On leaving School he entered Glasgow University as a student 
of medicine. Both at Hiilhead and Glasgow High School he was an enthusiastic 
member of the Cadet Corps, and soon after entering the University he joined the 
O.T.C. Though he might have sheltered behind his medical studies, now well 
advanced, Marcus Clark put his country's needs before all personal considerations, 
and ere the close of 1914 he was gazetted second lieutenant in the 11th Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders, but was later on transferred to the 1st, one of the most 
famous units of the old Army. He was present with them at the Battle of Loos, 

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when they penetrated far into the enemy's lines, but had to withdraw through the 
lack of support. Invalided home, he acted for a time as adjutant to the 16th and 
17th Cameronians at Hamilton. On proceeding again to France he was attached 
to the 2nd Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and it was while with them in 
command of a company in an attack on Polygon Wood that he was killed on 25th 
September, 1917. Captain Clark's company held their position for two days, 
though surrounded by the enemy, and received the special thanks of Sir Douglas 
Haig for their gallantry and tenacity. Captain Clark was not only a gallant 
soldier, but looked the part, and was just the one to lead a forlorn hope or hold 
to the death a vital position. < 



ERIC MACINTYRE CONNELL 

Lieutenant, Canadian Highlanders 

Lieutenant Eric M. Connell, second son of the late Mr. John T. Connell and 
of Mrs. Connell, 20 Lynedoch Street, Glasgow, received all his education at Hillhead 
High School. He had a great regard for his old School and never failed to visit it 
when he was in Glasgow. His teachers, who knew him as a bright and singularly 
promising pupil, rejoiced to see how well he was fulfilling the hopes of early years. 
At the age of nineteen he went to Canada, where, after varied experiences, he settled 
down to journalistic work, for which he had a marked aptitude. On the critical 
night of Tuesday, 4th August, 1914, he was standing with a group of companions 
outside Toronto Town Hall, waiting to learn the momentous decision of the British 
Cabinet as to peace or war. When the Mayor announced " War," Eric, turning to 
his companions, said, " Well, boys, is it fight or funk? " and within two minutes 
the whole band were enlisted as soldiers of the Empire. Before leaving Canada he 
was promoted sergeant, his former training in the ranks of the Glasgow Highlanders 
standing him in good stead. On going to France he was detained at the base for 
work in connection with the regimental records, but his ardent spirit chafed at 
work which could be done by less fit men, and he applied for a commission and was 
gazetted lieutenant in January, 1916. His last letter to his mother says, " By the 
time this reaches you we will have attempted a very dangerous piece of work, and 
it is certain we cannot all come out scaithless, but I am proud to be doing my bit 
for God and country." A fellow-officer writes, " Your son gallantly led his men 
in an attack on 13th June, 1916. He was ever encouraging, both by word and deed, 
and when danger was greatest he was coolest." Another writes, " His men were 
sorely grieved at his death, and spoke most highly of him, and I assure you that 
the good opinion of the men in the ranks is worth a great deal." The memory of 
Lieutenant Connell' s high seriousness, perfect courtesy, and unfailing devotion to 
duty will be a lasting possession to his friends. 



DANIEL M'D. COWIE 

Captain, The Highland Light Infantry 

WILLIAM COWIE 

Lieutenant, 13th Royal Scots 

These two brothers, sons of Mr. James Cowie, formerly of Messrs. John Mercer 
Co., Glasgow, now of Sydney, New South Wales, were educated in Hillhead High 

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School, and, prior to the war, were engaged in business in Glasgow. They were both 
keen and zealous officers, and earned their promotion by hard work and resolute 
leading. They came safely through all the heavy fighting of 1915 and 1916 till 
the big advance of 17th September, when so much ground was gained by our 
troops. The Highland Light Infantry and the Royal Scots played a memorable 
part in the struggle, and the two bi-others were mortally wounded during the 
action. Captain Daniel Cowie died of his wounds on the 17th September, 1916, but 
Lieutenant William Cowie lingered till the 25th September. The two brothers were 
determined and resourceful leaders, and had in the fullest measure the confidence 
of their men. The youngest brother, James Cowie, is a sergeant in the Glasgow 
Highlanders. 

A. ALLAN CRUICKSHANK 

Lance'Corporal, 17th Battalion HX.I. 

Lance-Corporal Cruickshank was the eldest son of the late Mr. A. A. 
Cruickshank, Inland Revenue. He was educated at Dumbarton Academy and 
Hillhead High School. At School he took a keen interest in all games, and was much 
esteemed both by his fellows and his teachers. On leaving School he kept up his 
interest in games, and for several years he was a prominent figure in Drumchapel 
Rugby team, and later in Clydesdale. When war broke out he was in the employ- 
ment of Messrs. Blackburn, King & Co., iron ore merchants, St. Vincent Street. 
He did not take long to decide where the path of duty lay, and was one of the first 
to join the newly formed Chamber of Commerce Battalion. He left for France in 
November, 1915, and came safely through till the beginning of the Great Push on 
the 1st of July, 1916. Since then he has been posted as missing, and the most 
diligent inquiries have failed to find any trace of him. The deepest sympathy is 
felt for his widowed mother, who had another son wounded in the same engagement. 



ALEXANDER CUNNINGHAM 

Private, 5th Scottish Rifles, attached Royal Scots 

Private Alexander Cunningham was the eldest son of Mr. Alexander 
Cunningham, M.A., Govan High School, and of Mrs. Cunningham, 40 Lawrence 
Street, Partick. His outlook at School was that of the student, and games had 
but little attraction for him. His class work often showed freshness and originality, 
and his thinking did not always follow the beaten track. Endowed with ability 
much above the average, he bade fair to reach a high place in the career he had 
chosen, that of analytical chemist. To this end he joined the Technical College, 
where he at once came to the front and took a high place in all his examinations. 
He could have obtained a safe post in a chemical work, but he preferred the path 
to honour to that of safety. In November, 1914, he joined the 5th S.R., and had 
a long and wearisome period of training in this country. In the summer of 1916 he 
proceeded to France, and was seriously wounded at the Battle of the So mm e in 
November of that year. When he recovered he was appointed gas instructor 
to one of the home battalions, and his fighting days were thought to be over. But 
matters were so serious in the early days of the German offensive of 1918 that every 
man of experience was commandeered for service in France. There Private 
Cunningham had his full share of the fighting. In April, 1918, he was officially 
reported " missing," but a few days later was able, after thrilling experiences, to 

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rejoin his battalion, now the 2nd Royal Scots. During the month of August he was 
fighting and advancing all the time, but on the 2nd September he was struck by a 
bullet and mortally wounded. His commanding officer, in a letter to the parents, 
writes, " He was without doubt the finest man in my platoon — in fact, in the whole 
company — and always cheery and willing. We all miss him greatly." That is an 
appropriate requiem for so gallant a soldier. 



FARQUHAR B, DAVIDSON 

2nd Lieutenant, I /6th H.L.I. 

Farquhar B. Davidson, who died of wounds in Gallipoli on 10th September, 1915, 
was educated at Albany Academy, Hillhead High School, and Allan Glen's. He 
was very fond of music and sketching, and was an enthusiastic member of the 
Hillhead High School F.P.'s Rugby team. On leaving School he entered the office of 
Aitken, Mackenzie & Clapperton as an apprentice chartered accountant. On the 
outbreak of war he at once joined the 6th H.L.I, as a private, and after eight 
months' training he was granted a commission in his own regiment — a rare and 
signal honour, and a high tribute to his worth. He left for Gallipoli on 3rd August, 
1915, and was only a short time there when he was mortally wounded while on 
special service. His work on the night on which he was wounded was specially 
commended by the brigadier, the divisonal general, and the corps commander. 
Major W. Menzies, writing home regarding him, said, " He had only been attached 
to my company for three weeks, but already he was beloved by all, and had proved 
himself brave to a degree and every inch a soldier." Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson, 
his commanding officer, wrote, " I chose him for this enterprise because of my faith 
in his readiness and courage. I consider that in him our country has lost a man of 
a calibre that could ill be spared in the present crisis." 



JOHN DICK 

Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery 

Gunner John Dick, whose sisters reside at 71 West Cumberland Street, belonged to 
the older generation of Hillhead High School pupils. He joined the School soon after 
it was opened, and continued there till he went into business. More than twenty-two 
years ago he joined the firm of Messrs. Law, Dawson & Co., hosiery warehousemen, 
56 Queen Street, Glasgow, and continued in their service till he joined the Army. 
He was held in the greatest esteem by his principals, and for a number of years he 
acted as one of their buyers. Mr. Dick was a keen golfer, and acted as match 
secretary of the North-Westem Golf Club. His bright and cheery disposition and 
frank, open nature made him an ideal secretary, and secured for him lasting friend- 
ships in all the relations of life. At the beginning of the war, though near the age 
limit, he volunteered for service, but was rejected owing to defective sight. On two 
or three other occasions he made unsuccessful efforts to enlist, but finally, in March, 
1916, when the need for men was greater, he was accepted. He proceeded to France 
in the autumn of that year, but was invalided home owing to an injury received while 
on duty. In June, 1917, he again returned to France as a private, although he had 
been repeatedly urged to take a commission. He was engaged in continuous heavy 
fighting for some months, and on 21st September, 1917, he was killed instantaneously 
by a German shell. His commanding officer writing to the relatives said, " He was 

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an excellent man, and served his King and country faithfully." No one who knew 
John Dick will question the appropriateness of this epitaph. 



J. HAMILTON DICKSON, L.D.S. 

2nd Lieutenant, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 

J. Hamilton Dickson was a pupil of rare promise. Nature had showered her 
gifts upon him — vigour of body, strength of character, keenness of mind. To these he 
added industry and perseverance. At School he was an enthusiastic Cadet, and has 
left the reputation of being the best bugler the corps ever had. He had, indeed, a 
passion for music, and for many years was rarely found absent from the orchestral 
concerts. On leaving School he enrolled as a student at the University and the 
Dental Hospital, and at the close of the session 1914-15 he graduated as L.D.S. 
Immediately war broke out he was posted to the 1st Camerons, and was probably the 
first of all our boys to see actual fighting in France. His career there was short but 
glorious, and the end was in entire keeping with his whole life. The story of it 
cannot be better told than in the simple words of a private soldier of his company — 
" I saw Mr. Dickson early in the fight advance from the firing line and carry a 
private of the regiment on his back, under fire, to cover behind a haystack. He was 
then wounded slightly on the head. I saw him later bandaging a lieutenant in the 
Coldstream Guards who was wounded on the right forearm. He then advanced with 
about a dozen m?n, and I saw him get wounded with a bit of shell." This happened 
on the 14th September, 1914, and the gallant J. Hamilton Dickson is still posted as 
" wounded and missing." 



WM. GURWOOD DOUGLAS, M.C. 

2nd Lieutenant, R.F.A. 

Second Lieutenant William G. Douglas was the elder surviving son of Mr. and 
Mrs. George Douglas, 56 Bishop's Road, Jordanhill. He was a boy of singularly 
attractive personality, and was beloved both by comrades and teachers. He was 
keen on all forms of games, but the Cadet Corps held the first place in his esteem, and 
to its interests he always remained devoted. On leaving School he entered the iron 
and steel trade, and he was just beginning to master its intricacies when war broke 
out. There was no hesitation in his case as to the path of duty and honour. In 
September, 1914, he, together with six other Hillhead High School boys, enlisted as 
privates in the Royal Field Artillery. From this branch of service he was later 
transferred to the 18th H.L.I, with commissioned rank. With them he saw much 
hard service in France, and was severely wounded. Towards the end of 1916, he 
returned to his unit, the Royal Field Artillery, this time with commissioned rank. 
Returning to France in the spring of 1918, he played a heroic part in the effort to 
stem the great German onset. For this he received the Military Cross. The 
Gazette notice states — " While in charge of a forward gun during an enemy attack, 
the gun was continuously shelled and small dumps of ammunition caught fire. He 
put out the fires as they occurred and kept the gun going throughout." His 
commanding officer, Colonel Forsyth, writing to congratulate him said — " I am 
proud you have been awarded this honour as I know it was well earned." During 
the British advance in the autumn he was again wounded and spent some time in 
hospital. He was convalescing at home, pending his discharge owing to the severe 

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nature of his wounds, when he took pneumonia and died after a week's illness on 
28th February, 1919. Special pathos is attached to the death of those who, like 
Lieutenant Douglas, came safely through all the perils and hardships of a four 
years' campaign, only to pass away in times of peace when no danger seemed near. 
Men who served in business with Lieutenant Douglas, and who latterly renewed the 
friendship in the tented field, wrote on hearing of his death — " A finer friend and a 
truer pal no man ever had." Another fellow-officer said — " Willie was a true man. 
The City of Glasgow, the world indeed, is poorer by the death of such an officer. He 
was all a true friend could be, and I can testify that in battle he was the embodiment 
of bravery." The School will ever cherish the memory of this gallant soldier and 
loyal son. 

JOHN K. DRON 

Lieutenant, 6th Battalion Trie Highland Light Infantry 

Lieutenant John K. Dron was educated at Hillhead High School and Glasgow 
Academy. He was a bright and promising youth, and highly popular with his 
schoolfellows. On the outbreak of war he joined the Glasgow Highlanders as a 
private, and proceeded overseas with the battalion in November, 1914. He came 
safely through the heavy fighting round La Bassee in the spring of 1915. His 
platoon commander writes — " He proved himself a capable and reliable soldier. 
No task was too dangerous or too arduous for him, and at all times his courage 
and cheerful spirit made him a favourite with his comrades." In September, 1915, 
he was gazetted to the 6th Battalion H.L.I. , serving for a time with the 2nd 
Battalion in Essex and the Curragh. In April, 1918, he was seconded to the 1st 
Battalion K.O.S.B., then on active service in France. On the 13th October, while 
on daylight patrol, he came under fire from a German machine gun, and was seen to 
fall wounded. While endeavouring to make his way back to our lines he was again 
shot and killed outright. Lieutenant Dron was of a singularly contented and cheery 
disposition, prepared to make the best of things as he found them. The memory of 
his attractive character and gallant deeds will long be cherished by his friends and 
old schoolfellows. 

DAVID DRUMMOND 

Private, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, The Duke of Albany's) 

David Drummond was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. James Drummond, 
21 Havelock Street, Dowanhill, Glasgow. At School he is remembered as a quiet, 
unobtrusive, painstaking pupil. He had good abilities, which his steady application 
put to the best use. On leaving School he entered the office of Messrs Buchanan, 
Gairdner & Tennant, stockbrokers, St. Vincent Street. After some time he left for 
Venezuela, where he was employed when war began. When the need for men became 
more insistent he threw up his post and came home to enlist in the Seaforth High- 
landers. Mr. Gerard, American Ambassador in Berlin, on one occasion twitted the 
German Foreign Secretary on the failure of the Germans in America to respond to 
the call of the Fatherland. They were willing to plot and scheme and give their 
money for the cause, but their lives, no. How different was the case with our gallant 
boys. They rallied to the Motherland from the ends of the earth and from the utter- 
most isles of the sea. The record of their service and the unparalleled privations, 
hardships, and dangers, many of them endured on their homeward trek will yet make 
one of the most glorious pages in the history of these years. Among these heroes 

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David Druminond is enshrined, for only a compelling sense of duty to the Homeland 
would have drawn so gentle and refined a youth to face the rough bludgeoning of war. 
He went to France in August, 1916, and saw much heavy fighting in the autumn and 
following spring. During the great German offensive he was badly wounded in the 
face, and never fully recovered. In October, 1918, while still in hospital at Sidcup, 
he fell a victim to influenza, and passed away on the 5th November. The grief and 
sorrow of his parents are shared by all his old class mates and teachers. 



GORDON CRAIG DUFFUS 

Lance-Corporal, 78th Battalion, Winnipeg Grenadiers 

Lance- Corporal Gordon Craig Duffus is still remembered at School as a quiet, 
reserved boy of studious habits and refined tastes. He held one of the School 
bursaries, and was regarded by all his teachers as a youth of much promise. He took 
no active part in School games, but found exercise and relaxation in roaming over the 
surrounding hills and fields. Nature made strong appeal to him, and he loved it in 
all its moods. After leaving School he entered the office of a firm of advocates in 
Aberdeen, where he served for one year. He then received an appointment in the 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, where he rapidly rose to the position of accountant in 
their branch at Kamsack, Saskatchewan. There he found full scope for his interest 
in country life, and proved himself an expert with rod and gun. Photography also 
attracted him, and he sent home many interesting views of Western life and scenery. 
No one who knew his high and keen sense of honour was surprised when news came 
that he was one of the first to join up. To his Army life and work he brought the 
same spirit of enthusiasm and devotion that marked his peace activities. He was 
soon promoted Lance-Corporal, and letters from his officers show that he was singled 
out for early promotion to commissioned rank when he was wounded in the Battle of 
the Somme. He lingered on in Rouen Hospital till the 24th December, 1916, but 
never a murmur came from him at any time. From the first he had counted the cost, 
and he " laid him down with a will." 



HUGH STEWART ARCHER DUNLOP 

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Air Force 

Second Lieutenant Hugh Stewart Archer Dunlop was the elder son of Mr. 
and Mrs. George A. Dunlop, 2 Teviot Terrace, Glasgow. He was known at School 
as a steady, reliable boy of quiet and unassuming manner, but of strong, resolute 
will. He was an enthusiastic member of the First Glasgow Troop of Boy Scouts, and 
there are few of its degrees which he did not possess. On August, 1914, though only 
sixteen years of age, he joined up as a dispatch rider and draft conductor, conveying 
recruits to their various depots in Scotland and Ireland. Some months later he 
transferred to the Glasgow Highlanders. There his Scout training stood him in 
good stead, and he received rapid promotion. In April, 1917, he was recommended 
for a commission, and he spent some months in a cadet school near Plymouth. Soon 
after finishing his course an urgent call was made for volunteers for the Royal Air 
Force. This service made strong appeal to Hugh's bold and venturesome spirit, and 
he at once responded. He received his training in the Royal School of Aeronautics 
at Reading, and was then sent to Stamford, Lincolnshire, to complete his practical 

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course. His letters describing his experiences as a flying man are full of vivid 
description, and clearly reveal the self-confident, self-possessed aerial pilot. He 
passed all his tests with the utmost credit and was certified as giving promise of 
becoming a really first-rate pilot. On the 4th April, 1918, the day on which he was 
to receive his wings, he was invited to go up for a short flight by an instructor who 
was waiting for his observer. The machine had hardly left the aerodrome when it 
crashed, and both occupants were killed instantaneously. It is indeed tragic to think 
of the gallant Hugh, with his ardent desire for service, thus cut off on the very brink 
of opportunity. 



MATTHEW STEEL DUNLOP 

Private, llth Battalion, The Royal Scots 

Matthew Steel Dunlop was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alex. D. Dunlop, Mahratta, 
Lenzie. He was born on the 19th April, 1898, and entered Hillhead High School 
in 1904, leaving in 1912. At School he was a fine, manly, frank, reliable boy 
who always saw the bright side of things, and was a universal favourite with his 
comrades. He had strong artistic tastes, and was a clever sketcher in black and 
white. On leaving School he entered the office of P. S. MacLellan, stockbroker, 
West George Street, and later transferred to the firm of Messrs. Turner & Houston, 
chartered accountants, St. Vincent Street. There he remained till he enlisted early 
ir. 1917 in The Royal Scots. His period of training was short, as in twelve weeks 
from joining the Army he found himself in the fighting line in France. This must 
have been a severe strain upon the young soldier, but here his School and home train- 
ing stood him in good stead, and he passed through the ordeal with credit. During 
the fierce fighting in front of St. Quentin in August, 1917, he was severely wounded 
in the neck by a piece of shrapnel. He was in hospital in England for four months, 
and was then sent to a convalescent camp in Randalstown, Ireland. From there 
he was transferred early in 1918 to the convalescent camp at Nigg. In the critical 
days of March the demand for soldiers, especially experienced soldiers, was insistent. 
An appeal was made at Nigg for volunteers, and Private Dunlop, with some other 
heroic comrades, answered the call. In a few weeks he found himself again in 
France, and shared in the glorious deeds of General Plumer's Second Army. He 
bad many stirring adventures during the advance across the shell-pitted fields of 
Flanders, and his letters home, while reflecting something of the hardships and 
dangers of his lot, breathe a fine spirit of devotion and cheerful endurance. On 
the 28th September, 1918, the Second Army pushed back the German lines over 
5 miles, and on the 29th, when victory was already assured, Matthew Dunlop and 
almost all his company were killed By the bursting of a shell in their midst. His 
company commander, writing home, says — " He proved himself a stout man in the 
line, and once, under a very heavy shell fire, he gave me valuable assistance and 
sustained a slight wound in consequence." 



ROBERT DUNLOP 

Private, London Scottish 

Robert Dunlop was the elder son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Dunlop, Alcluith, West 
Kilbride. At School he set a splendid example of uprightness, loyalty, and good 

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sense. He took a keen interest in all games, and was an active member of the 
Boy Scouts, being one of the first to join the 1st Glasgow Troop. On leaving School 
he joined the firm of Kerr & Richardson, Limited, wholesale stationers, where he 
rose to be assistant manager. On the outbreak of war he was one of the first to 
join, and September saw him enrolled in the Army Service Corps. After training 
at Maryhill he proceeded to Bridge of Allan, and thence to Egypt. After a 
short time there he was sent to Serbia, and took part in the great retreat. Much 
travelled he was, then sent back to Egypt, when he was transferred to the Gordon 
Highlanders. In the spring of 1918 he was attached to the London Scottish, and 
went with them to France. It was indeed hard for him, and others like him who 
had experienced all the privations and perils of the Eastern campaign, to be thrown 
into the furnace of the Western Front when the battle was hottest. The prospect 
of seeing loved ones at home reconciled all to the change, but the gallant Robert 
was fated never to see the hills of home. On the 1st August he went with the 
rest of his Lewis gun team to occupy an important post in the line. During a heavy 
bombardment a shell burst in the vicinity, and Robert Dunlop and his corporal were 
killed. His commanding officer writes — " He was a man we all admired, and we 
all miss the presence of a brave and courageous comrade." His sergeant, in giving 
expression to the sympathies of officers and men, says — " I learned how valuable 
your son was as a soldier. He was so keen and active at his work and so happy in 
disposition that he won a place in the hearts of all his comrades which it is impossible 
to fill. He died a glorious death, and will live on in the memories of us all." 



JAMES DUNN, A,M.LC.E. 

Lieutenant, Queen Victoria's Own Sappers and Miners, Indian Army 

Lieutenant James Dunn was the second son of the late Mr. James Dunn, of 
Glasgow and Ardoch, Dumbartonshire. He was educated privately and at Hillhead 
High School. There he proved himself a youth of great promise, showing rare 
ability in Mathematics and Science. He took a prominent part in raising the School 
Cadet Corps, and to the last was interested in its progress. On leaving School he 
served his apprenticeship as a civil engineer with the late Sir W. R. Copland, 
graduating A.M.I.C.E. in 1906. In 1908 he was appointed to the Public Works 
Department, Indian Civil Service, and was posted for duty in Burma, where he 
remained until the outbreak of war. While still an apprentice in Glasgow he was 
given a commission in the 6th H.L.I. , and took an active part in all its activities. 
Tall, broad-shouldered, athletic, he looked every inch the soldier. In Burma he 
found scope for his military zeal in the Mounted Rifles, and when war began he 
transferred to the 2nd Q.V.O. Sappers and Miners, with which unit he served 
throughout the war in the East and in German East Africa. For valuable services 
rendered in the latter place he was mentioned in despatches. On the surrender of 
the German forces he set sail for India. On the voyage he fell a victim to the 
influenza which was then raging, and died of pneumonia three days after the signing 
of the armistice, and was buried at sea. A special pathos attaches to the fate of 
those who like Lieutenant Dunn passed unscathed through the hardships, diseases, 
and perils of war only to be cut off in the moment of victory and peace. The School 
will long cherish the memory of this gallant soldier, who was ever faithful to its 
highest traditions, and who is mourned by a wide circle of old schoolfellows and 
friends. 

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Biographies 



THOMAS SEMPLE DUNN 

Private, 5th Batt., The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 

Thomas Semple Dunn was the third son of Mrs. Dunn, 461 Sauchiehall Street, 
Glasgow. He received all his education in Hillhead High School, where the memory 
of his high abilities, sunny disposition, and high moral sense are still fresh and 
fragrant. During his School days he was not over-robust, and took little direct 
part in the School games, but he was no mere book-worm, and his joy and zest in 
life was as keen as that of the strongest. On leaving School he entered the office 
of Messrs. Wilson, Stirling & Co., chartered accountants, as an apprentice. There 
he displayed the same high qualities as at School, and won for himself the confidence 
of his employers and the hearty goodwill of his fellow-workers. " Grim visaged 
war " made no appeal to his refined and gentle nature, but the call of duty over- 
weighed all other considerations, and though still under age he joined the Scottish 
Rifles in October, 1914. He was urged to take a commission, but he thought he 
would be more fitted for such a post after a spell in the trenches in France. That 
(vas quite characteristic of Tom Dunn, with' his high sense of duty and his extreme 
thoroughness. During an attack on the German lines on the 29th October, 1916, 
he was reported " missing," and for months his widowed mother had to endure 
an agony of suspense as to his fate. Ultimately news came that his body had been 
found and reverently buried in a small cemetery behind the firing line. Thus 
passed another of our young heroes into the silent land. 

JOHN WATSON EMSLIE 

Sergeant, 3lst Canadian Infantry Battalion 

Sergeant John Watson Emslie was one of three gallant brothers, all old pupils 
of Hillhead High School, who came over with the first Canadian contingent to fight 
for the homeland. Of these Lieutenant W. J. Emslie was invalided home to 
Edmonton, Alberta, where, happily, he made a good recovery. Corporal C. G. 
Emslie, 3rd Canadian Divisional Signal Company, was recommended for a com- 
mission. In the summer of 1917 Sergeant John Watson Emslie, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, received the Military Medal, and was recommended 
for a commission. The headmaster, as soon as he heard of the distinc- 
tion, wrote Sergeant Emslie conveying to him the hearty congratulations of the 
School on his well-merited honour. The letter, however, was returned, as mean- 
while Sergeant Emslie had been killed on the 6th November, 1917, in the fierce 
fighting for Paschendaele ridge. One of his officers writing to Lieutenant Emslie 
says, " His platoon thought the world of him, and were behind him in everything. 
As a soldier he had no equal with us, and was recognised as the best N.C.O. in the 
battalion. He was always bright and cheery, ready to do anything for the line, 
and was alert and heedful of the comfort of his men." The School will always hold 
in highest honour those chivalrous souls who, like Sergeant Emslie, heard the call 
to service from afar and made instant answer. 



THOMAS M'DOWALL FERGUSON 

Private, 1st H.L.I. 

Private M'D. Ferguson was the only son of Mr. George Ferguson, Craigpark 
Avenue, Dennistoun, and grandson of the late Mr. Thomas M'Dowall, Jordanhill. 

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Hillhead High School 



At School he was known as a reserved and studious youth of refined character and 
gentle nature. He was schoolfellow and inseparable companion of John MTntosh, 
an old boy who also made the supreme sacrifice. They were very much alike in 
their tastes and pursuits, and both were noted for their sterling uprightness in 
word and deed. He took an active part in games, but books, music, and Nature 
in all her aspects made strong appeal to him. He trained as a teacher under the 
Provincial Committee and in the University. While engaged in munitions work 
soon after the outbreak of war he strained his heart, and had to rest for almost 
a year. On his recovery he enlisted in the H.L.I. , and after a short period of 
training he was sent in January, 1917, to Mesopotamia. He shared in the perils 
and the honour of the great advance there, but in the last attack on the Turks at 
the end of October, 1918, he was wounded in the knee and captured by the enemy. 
He was taken to a Turkish hospital, but a day or two later the Turks retreated, 
leaving the patients and hospital staff behind. It was found necessary to amputate 
the leg, and though he rallied for a time, he passed away on the 2nd of November. 
War and strife of any kind were utterly abhorrent to his gentle nature, but the 
chaplain wrote home — " He is quite the bravest and most cheerful of men." He 
now rests close to the banks of the Tigris and near the ancient city of Nineveh. 



DANIEL LEITCH M'PHERSON FLECK 

Private, 44th Battalion, Canadian Infantry 

Private Daniel L. M'P. Fleck was the fourth son of the late Rev. W. S. Fleck, 
M.A., Fairlie, Ayrshire. He was educated at Fairlie School, and later, from 
1893 to 1900, at Hillhead High School. On leaving School he was for a time in 
the office of Agar, Cross & Co., merchants, Glasgow, but in 1903 he went to Canada 
and settled as a farmer at Virden, Manitoba. There he was widely known and 
highly respected. In 1915 he enlisted as a private in the 179th Cameron High- 
landers, which was afterwards merged in the 44th Infantry Battalion. After long 
periods of training in various camps in Canada and England he went to France in 
February, 1917. He came safely through the hurricane fighting for Vimy Ridge 
in April of that year, but was wounded by shrapnel near Sens soon after. He was 
in hospital in this country for a time, but made a good recovery and returned to 
France in November. During the great German Push in the spring of 1918 he saw 
much fighting and had many hairbreadth escapes. During the British advance in 
July and August, 1918, his battalion was hotly engaged for weeks on end, and on 
the 10th of August Private Fleck was shot through the head by a sniper while 
looking after the wounded. High tributes were paid to his character and 
influence by his officers and comrades, who regarded him as a man to be implicitly 
trusted in times of stress and trial. He leaves a widow in Virden to mourn his 
loss, and to her the tenderest sympathy of the School is extended. 



WALTER FREER 

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Air Force 

Second Lieutenant Walter Freer, elder son of Mr. Edward Freer, of Glasgow 
Corporation Halls, and of Mrs. Freer, 37 Derby Street, W., was a bright, active 
youth at School, full of hope and fun, and a universal favourite. He showed a 
marked linguistic bent, and for a schoolboy was exceptionally well read in modern 

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literature. He thought at first of following a literary career, but he eventually 
decided on becoming an analytical chemist, for which also he had an aptitude. Soon 
after the outbreak of war, though still under age, he offered himself to the Scottish 
Branch of the Red Cross Society as motor ambulance driver, and served for six 
months in Rouen. Thereafter he joined the Infantry Training Reserve, and was 
later transferred to the Royal Air Force as a cadet, receiving his commission in 
April, 1918. During his period of training he paid frequent visits to his old School, 
and all were delighted to see how month by month he grew not only in stature but 
in character. Straight and lithe, he looked a fine figure in his pilot's dress, and 
alertness and resolution looked out from every feature. On the 11th of September, 
1918, he left for France as a reconnaissance and day bombing pilot. Writing home 
soon after, he says that he was frequently up and across the German lines three 
times a day, a heavy strain for a youth of barely nineteen. On the 6th October 
he set out on special reconnaissance work on the coast in the neighbourhood of 
Dixmude. He failed to return, and though the most searching inquiries were made, 
no definite information as to his fate has yet been received. His squadron com- 
mander wrote — " He was a very popular boy, and was marked out as a coming 
leader of the squadron." The utmost sympathy of the School goes out to his 
parents, brother and sisters, who have had to endure so long and trying a suspense. 



ERIC A. GORDON 

2nd Lieutenant, HJL.I. 

Eric A. Gordon, the only son of the late Mr. Robert Gordon, Kandy, Ceylon, 
and of Mrs. Gordon, 19 Highburgh Gardens, Glasgow, was a pupil in Hillhead High 
School for over nine years. The intimation of his death in action fell upon the 
School like a thunderbolt; for the School had taken Eric Gordon to its heart of 
hearts. He was its hero, almost its idol, and great things were looked for from 
him. Nature had fashioned him on big lines, and showered her gifts upon him with 
full hands. His frank, open nature, his lovable disposition, his generous spirit, 
his prowess on the playing field, all combined to give him a unique place in the 
affection of his fellows. At Rugby he was probably the greatest three-quarter the 
School ever had. Powerfully built, of great speed, and absolutely fearless, it was 
no easy task to stop him once he was set agoing. For two seasons he held the 
tennis championship, and when only fifteen years of age won the School champion- 
ship at the sports in June, 1914. At cricket and water polo he was for several years 
the mainstay of the teams. With such a record it might be expected that his work 
in the classroom would seriously suffer. This, happily, was not the case. Possessed 
of marked ability and creditable, though not excessive, industry, he was always to 
be found in the first flight among his compeers. At the close of his course he 
obtained the Group Leaving Certificate, with passes in the Higher Grade in six 
subjects — English, French, mathematics, science, dynamics, and analytical geometry. 
He had also another side to his character, known only to his intimates. He was 
passionately attached to his home, and was a most devoted and dutiful son. In the 
winter of 1916 he obtained a commission in the H.L.I. , and proceeded to France 
in the summer of 1917. While there he had some minor illnesses which kept him 
out of the fighting line for a time. In March, 1918, he was due home on leave, 
but the opening of the great offensive detained him with his regiment. On the 
morning of the 21st March, while still a long way behind the firing line, a chance 
shell landed near one of the officers' huts, causing several minor casualties, and 

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mortally wounding Eric Gordon, who survived but a few minutes. Captain Christie, 
his commanding officer, says, " He joined my company when he first came out, 
and it did not take me long to find out his true worth. He was one of the best, and 
never hesitated to do what was required. I shall miss him much, for he was one of 
the mainstays of the company." The heartfelt sympathy of the School goes out to 
his widowed mother and sister. 



HARRY J. GRAHAM 

Lance-Corporal, 9th Battalion The Black Watch. (Royal Highlanders) 

Lance-Corporal Harry J. Graham enlisted in The Black Watch on 2nd Septem- 
ber, 1914. While at School he was a thoughtful, studious boy whose interests did 
not lie much along the line of games. On leaving school he entered the office of 
the Coltness Iron Company, Limited, 138 West George Street, where he continued 
till war broke out. For four years he was a member of the 5th Scottish Rifles, 
and took a keen interest in this branch of training. Like so many more gallant 
fellows, he fell in the fierce onslaught on 25th September, 1915. Much sympathy 
is felt for his widowed mother, whose only son he was. 



WILLIAM MUIR CAMPBELL HAIR 

Rifleman, 2nd Battalion, 3rd New Zealand Rifle Brigade 

Rifleman William M. C. Hair was the only son of the late Mr. W. B. Hair, 
house factor, Glasgow, and of Mrs. Hair, Hamilton Park Terrace, Hillhead. He 
was educated at Glasgow High School and Hillhead High School. He was a 
prominent figure in all forms of sport, and was an active member of the School 
Rugby team and of the Former Pupils' XV. In November, 1913, he left this country 
for Australia, and later went on to New Zealand. With the outbreak of war he at 
once volunteered for service, and was one of the first of the New Zealanders to land 
in Egypt. After sharing in the early fighting there he was transferred to France 
with the first New Zealand contingent. He came safely through the first stages 
of the Somme Battle, but in September, 1916, while acting as dispatch runner he 
was reported wounded, but no definite information could be obtained as to his 
ultimate fate. Eventually a court of inquiry decided that he might be presumed 
killed. The School pays homage to this gallant soldier from across the seas who 
made such instant response to the call for men. 



DAVID SIDNEY HALL, M.C. 

Flight Commander, R,F.C. (late Argylls) 

Captain and Flight Commander Sidney Hall was the youngest son of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Hall, Berkfell, Helensburgh. Educated at Dunoon Grammar School, 
the Hermitage School, and Hillhead High School, in his short life he has gained 
honour enough to share amongst them. At Hillhead he was a contemporary of Steven 
Reith, and a rival of his for distinction in mathematics and science. On leaving 
School he entered the office of Paterson' & Benzie, chartered accountants, Glasgow. 
He was one of the first to answer the call for service, and in October, 1914, he 

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joined the Commercial Battalion as a private. After a period of training with them 
he received a commission in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and went to 
France in July, 1915. In December of the same year he was transferred to the 
Royal Flying Corps, where he soon proved himself to be a daring and fearless 
pilot. On more than one occasion he received the congratulations of his com- 
manding officer, and was promoted flight commander. Only a few weeks ago news 
came that he had been awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in 
action. He was looking forward joyfully to his promised leave of absence at 
Christmas, but on the 20th November, 1917, during the great advance near St. Omer, 
he was shot down. There is special pathos attached to the loss of this gallant officer, 
cut off while his hard-won honours were still fresh upon him. In conveying the 
sad intelligence to the parents his commanding officer wrote, " Captain Hall was 
one of the best pilots I have ever known, and a splendid leader. He was very keen, 
and was loved by all who came in contact with him. He was my right-hand man 
since I have commanded the squadron. It is always the best who go first, and your 
son has gone. He has given his life for King and country, and no soldier can do 
more. He will be mourned and missed in our mess to-night." 



J. M. W. HALLEY, M.C., F.R.I.B.A. 

Major, Royal Engineers 

Major J. M. W. Halley, Royal Engineers, who was killed in action on 24th 
October, 1918, was the son of Mr. Joseph Halley, of 43 Lawrence Street, Partick. 
Particulars of his death have now reached the family from a brother officer. The 
writer says — " After the glorious victory of the Lys, in which the three field 
companies of this division had excelled themselves, they moved forward to the 
Scheldt. ... On the early evening of 24th October Major Halley and another 
officer crawled out to the rive/ bank to have a look at it; suddenly a sniper fired 
at them from the other bank, instantly killing the Major. His companion lay still 
for two hours and was fired at repeatedly, but not hit. Major Halley's body was 
afterwards recovered. The funeral service was held at the graveside, and was very 
impressive. There was a firing party of our men, a bugler to sound the ' Last 
Post,' and four pipers from a kilted battalion played ' The Flowers of the Forest.' 
The divisional commander attended, and many staff officers and representatives 
from the different infantry battalions of the division. A neat wooden cross is being 
erected to-day. The wood for this cross was taken from some oak beams in an old 
windmill— -this we thought appropriate for the Major, who was a great admirer of 
these weird-looking structures, which are so characteristically Flemish. We all 
felt when we left the cemetery that we had done full military honours to the gallant 
officer and true gentleman." Major Halley had been wounded last year in Arras. 

Major Halley was born in Glasgow forty-one years ago, and educated at Hillhead 
High School. He served his architectural apprenticeship with Messrs Lieper and 
Messrs. Burnett. He came to London about twenty years ago, where he worked in 
the office of Messrs. Niven & Wigglesworth for a few years, after which he became 
assistant to Mr. Mervyn Macartney, official architect to St. Paul's Cathedral, 
and he became a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects. He was well 
known among architects for his deep and intimate knowledge of English Renaissance 
architecture, and his skill and ingenuity in applying that knowledge to modern 
design. Unfortunately most of his work was not carried into material existence. 
His design for The Hague Royal Palace of Peace, for which he received one of the 

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awards, and his design for the new Mitchell Library at Glasgow, which was placed 
on the short leet, were his most sustained efforts. A small house which he built 
for himself in the Garden Suburb of Hampstead aroused a good deal of professional 
interest. Major Halley wrote a good deal for the architectural press, and had 
completed a book on Piranesi, which it is hoped will be published. He was deeply 
interested in St. Paul's Cathedral, and under Mr. Macartney he was responsible for 
much of the design in the Chapel of St. Michael and St. George there. He wrote 
a very interesting paper on " The Rebuilding and Workmen of St. Paul's Cathedral 
from the Accounts," which received the R.I.B.A. prize in 1914. Major Halley's 
deep knowledge and fine taste and great industry would have brought him high 
distinction in his profession if he had lived. He was twice married; his second 
marriage took place on his last visit home. 



MAT. WHITE HALLEY 
Lieutenant, Indian Army Reserve of Officers 

The School owes Lieutenant M. W. Halley a special debt of gratitude, as he 
was one of the originators of the Former Pupils' Club, and chiefly responsible for 
forming a Rugby section in connection with it. He was for many years a well- 
known figure in University circles, and in his time there was no more popular player 
in Rugby football in the West of Scotland. He was fond of all outdoor sport, and was 
a great walker. His holidays were usually devoted to walking tours, and on one of 
them he walked round Arran in record time. 

Lieutenant Halley was a naval architect by profession, and when he finished his 
course at the University he accepted a post in India, where he was for about ten years. 
Prior to going to India he was an enthusiastic Volunteer, being for eight years a 
member of the Hillhead detachment of the Glasgow Highlanders. In India he joined 
a Scottish Volunteer regiment, and had the honour of being chosen as the only repre- 
sentative from Upper Burma to attend the Durbar at Delhi. When war broke out 
Mr. Halley applied for a commission, and was gazetted lieutenant in the Indian Army. 
Greatly to the regret of all who knew him, he took blackwater fever, and died on the 
29th November, 1914, aged thirty-five. 



JOHN HANNAH 

Private, The King's Own Scottish Borderers 

Private John Hannah was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. John Hannah, 27 Ibrox 
Street, Ibrox. He received his early education in Parson's Green School, Edin- 
burgh, and, after a short term in Ibrox School, Govan, he entered Hillhead High 
School with a Scholarship. There he completed the full secondary course of five 
years, gaining in his last session the Group Leaving Certificate. John Hannah was 
a pupil of marked ability and high promise, and gained several bursaries and prizes 
during his course. Games did not attract him, but he was an enthusiastic member 
of the Photographic Club, and all the time he could spare from studies he devoted to 
his favourite pastime. He was a member of the Officers' Training Corps, and might 
have entered the Army with a commission, but he believed he would best qualify for 
leadership by serving for a term in the ranks. During his short course as a soldier 
he displayed a splendid spirit. He told the headmaster that he found soldiering an 



Biographies 



ideal life, and he had a word of praise for everything connected with his camp 
surroundings, for his comrades, his officers, his quarters, and his food. He was only 
a short time in France, but he saw much heavy fighting. On the 16th December, 

1917, he was wounded by shrapnel. His colonel, writing to the headmaster, said 
the wound was a slight one, and he hoped Private Hannah would soon be back to 
Blighty. This hope proved vain, as he passed peacefully away on the 7th January, 

1918, in hospital at Rouen. He has left behind in the School many friends who will 
cherish the memory of his upright, obliging, courteous nature, and his high 
abilities. 



GEORGE MELVEN HARLEY 
12th (Service) Battalion The Highland Light Infantry- 
Captain George M. Harley was one of a brilliant class that included Lieutenants 
Hamilton Dickson, Bertie Christison, and F. B. Davidson. These continued into 
later life their School friendships, and in death were not greatly divided. While he 
was at School Captain Harley was an enthusiastic Cadet, and when he went to the 
University he transferred to the O.T.C. there. When war broke out he volunteered 
at once, and was given a commission in the Highland Light Infantry, being attached 
ultimately to the 12th Battalion. He attained rapid promotion, being gazetted 
captain a few months after joining. He was a student of the Anderson Medical 
College, the Dental Hospital, and the University, and was in the final year of his 
studies when the call came. Like so many more, he fell gloriously in the fatal field 
of Loos, 25th September, 1915. His commanding officer in a letter to his parents 
says, " It is with the greatest sorrow I write to tell you that your dear son was killed 
in action while gallantly leading his company against the German trenches. He died 
a hero's death, and I hope this may in some measure console you. I feel your dear 
son's loss very much. He was an officer in whom I placed the greatest reliance, 
and I indeed sympathise in your loss." War means waste — waste of accumulated 
treasure, waste of potential energy, and, worst of all, waste of hopeful life, and 
nowhere does one feel this more than in recording the death of men like Captain 
George Harley. 

JOHN A. HARPER, M.C, M.A.. M.B., Ch.B. 
Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps 

Captain John A. Harper was the second son of Mr. Alexander R. Harper, J. P., 
and Mrs. Harper, 8 Brighton Terrace, Ibrox. Educated at Hillhead High School 
and Glasgow University, he had a brilliant scholastic career, carrying off many 
prizes and bursaries. He was, however, no mere book worm, but took as high a 
place on the Rugby and athletic field as in the academic. His was a singularly bright 
and sunny nature, and he radiated happiness and brightness wherever he went. In 
1911 he graduated M.B., Ch.B., and for a time acted as house physician in the 
Western Infirmary. After a visit to India and America he settled down to private 
practice in Govan, where he also held several public appointments. 

In December, 1915, he went to France as medical officer to the 7th Yorkshire 
Regiment, which was at that time holding part of the Ypres salient. There his 
devoted and fearless service soon gained for him the Military Cross. The official 
record states that it was granted for ' ' conspicuous gallantry when leading stretcher- 
bearers during operations. On one occasion when three of his bearers were wounded 

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he went alone under heavy shell fire to the aid post." A brother-officer describing 
another of his gallant deeds says, " John Harper (who is likely to get his D.S.O. 
for his work) went out time after time in the teeth of a whirlwind of machine gun fire 
right up to the German trenches and carried in the wounded on his broad back." 
These incidents, and many more could be cited, are typical of the man who was by 
nature cast in a heroic mould. The adjutant of the regiment writes, " It was his 
greatest pride that he never once left one of our wounded in the trenches or in ' No 
Man's Land ' when the battalion was relieved, and, as 80 per cent, of this battalion's 
casualties occurred in ' No Man's Land,' this is a most wonderful record." Colonel 
Harold Barron, A.D.M.S., 17th Division, testifies, " He had earned the respect and 
admiration of us all through his continued gallantry and devotion to duty and his 
of bearing. We have lost one that we are proud to have called a friend." 



ARCHIE MURDOCH HART 

Private, Glasgow Highlanders 

Private A. M. Hart, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hart, 154 Queen's Drive, Queen's 
Park, Glasgow, was born in Antigua, British West Indies, in 1888. He was educated 
at Larchfield Academy and Hillhead High School. On leaving school he entered an 
office in Glasgow, but at the end of two years he left for Antigua, where his father 
had important business interests. Like so many more of our gallant boys, he could 
not remain in safety and security abroad while his countrymen at home were fighting 
for existence and for all that makes life worth living. Early in 1915, therefore, 
he came home, and enlisted as a private in the Glasgow Highlanders. After a period 
of training he went to France, and fell in the fierce fight of 15th July, 1916, which 
proved fatal to so many gallant Highlanders. The School will ever cherish the 
memory of his lofty patriotism and his devoted self-sacrifice. 



ROY DOUGLAS HARVEY 

Private, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) 

Private Roy D. Harvey was the elder son of Mrs. Harvey, 57 Ancaster Drive, 
Glasgow. He entered School in 1898, and left in 1915, when he removed to Bears- 
den. At School he is remembered as a reserved, thoughtful boy, who at all times set 
before himself and acted up to a high ideal of conduct. He was noted for his 
thoroughness, accuracy, and precision, and took a good place in all his classes. On 
leaving School he began business in the coal export trade, but on his father's death 
he left to manage his business at 398 Byres Road. During the earlier part of the 
war he was prevented from enlisting by a physique which fell below the standard then 
required. The time came when military exigencies led to a lowering of the standard, 
and Roy met the call with alacrity and relief. After the usual period of training he 
left for France in October, 1917. He came safely through the fiercely contested 
Battle of Cambrai, but soon afterwards was invalided home with trench fever. He 
returned to France in the spring of 1918, and shared the dangers and hardships of 
that trying time. Three days after the sweeping British advance on the 8th August, 
in a gallant and successful attack by his battalion, the 5/6th Royal Scots, he was 
struck by a bullet, and killed instantaneously. A Canadian who found his body was 
the first to send home the sad news. It was quite characteristic of Roy that in his 
pocket were found a diary written up to 10th August, the day before he fell, and a 

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Gem Collins' Dictionary. His precise, methodical habits were maintained even amid 
the dangers of the battlefield and the discomforts of the trenches. Part of the 
comfort which remains to those left to mourn is the thought that every such life laid 
down in generous sacrifice not only makes for a purer and better world, but inherits 
the promise of fuller and more abundant life. To his widowed mother, his sister and 
brother, the whole-hearted sympathy of the School is extended. 



GORDON RITCHIE HAY 
Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland Light Infantry 

Private Gordon Ritchie Hay was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. James M. 
Hay, Torwood, Kelvinside Gardens, Glasgow, and Haslemere, Troon. On leaving 
School he entered his father's business, and sought to prepare himself for his life- 
work by hard work and regular attendance at evening classes. For several years 
until he went on service, he was actively associated with Band of Hope mission work, 
in the fostering of which he displayed an extraordinary interest and untiring zeal. 
On the outbreak of war he joined the Former Pupils' Training Corps, of which he was 
an enthusiastic member, and early in 1915 he enlisted in the Glasgow Highlanders as 
a private. 

After a long period of training at home he proceeded to France in March, 1916, 
and fell in action at High Wood on the 15th July of that year. A comrade, writing 
home, says that in advancing to the attack on the night of the Hth they came across 
a party of Germans who were holding a strong position in a wood, and who shouted 
something to them. Private Hay, as the only one who could speak German, was 
asked to tell them to come out and give themselves up. Shortly afterwards he was 
struck by a bullet in the head, and died on the instant. Under his quiet and gentle 
disposition lay hidden much strength and purpose of character, and he became a 
soldier from no love of fighting, but a simple sense of duty. He was a lad of great 
charm of manner and great capacity for friendship, and in a letter from the front 
reporting the circumstances of his death, the writer says, " Your son was one of the 
finest young men I ever had the pleasure of meeting, of a cheery disposition and 
generous to a fault." In the hard school of war he proved himself a true soldier, 
and was greatly beloved by all his comrades. He was twenty years of age. 



JOHN HENRY 
Lieutenant, Army Cyclist Corps (Attached 9th Corps) 

ROBERT WILLIAMSON HENRY 

Company Quartermaster-Sergeant, 16th Batt. Canadian Infantry 
(Canadian Scottish) 

These two brothers were sons of Mrs. Henry, Duncraggan, Bishopton. Lieu- 
tenant John Henry, the elder, was deeply interested in religious and social work, and 
was an attached member, first of Elgin Place Congregational Church, and later of 
Erskine Parish Church. For many years he was captain of the Boys' Brigade con- 

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nected with Elgin Place Mission, and even after he removed to Bishopton he used 
to go to Glasgow every Sunday to conduct the Brigade Bible class. His enthusiasm 
and cheerfulness particularly fitted him to win the confidence and admiration of the 
young, and though now dead he yet speaks, and will continue to speak, through the 
lives and thoughts of his boys. On the outbreak of war he at once joined the Glasgow 
Highlanders, and in November went to France with them as sergeant. There his 
unselfish, generous nature found ample scope, and he was greatly beloved by all his 
comrades. In August, 1915, after being wounded, he was gazetted Second Lieu- 
tenant to the 9th Corps, Cyclist Battalion. After a period of training he once more 
returned to France. On the 13th April, 1918, during the fierce fighting round 
Meterin, his company came under heavy shell fire. Lieutenant Henry shouted to his 
men to hurry up and get out, and he would bring up the rear. What happened after 
is only conjecture. In the hurry of a forced retreat there is no time to look back, 
but it is conjectured that he was struck by a shell and killed outright. One of his 
senior officers writes — " He was one of the best and most popular officers in the 
battalion, and it will be impossible to replace him." 

Company Quartermaster-Sergeant Robert W. Henry, better known as Robin, 
was of the same generous, unselfish, loyal type as his elder brother. In 1904, when 
he was twenty-one years of age, he went to Winnipeg, and later to Calgary. Finally, 
he settled down in Cranbrook, Dakota, as an estate agent, and was building up a 
fine business when war began. Settling up his affairs as best he could he joined the 
Canadian Scottish in October, 1914. He did not get to England till the following 
March. After a short leave home he went to France on the 26th April. A month 
later, at the Battle of Festubert, 20th May, 1915, fought at the urgent request of 
the French General in order to relieve the pressure on his lines, but a hopeless affair 
from the outset, the company of the Canadian Scottish lost eighty-four men, and 
among them C.Q.M.S. Henry, who was shot through the head and killed instantly. 
His commanding officer reports that he was one of his best non-commissioned officers. 
The whole-hearted sympathy of the School goes out to his widowed mother, who has 
been doubly bereaved. 



JAMES D. HERBERTSON, Jun. 
Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve 

Lieutenant James D. Herbertson, R.N.Y.R., was the son of Mr. James D. 
Herbertson, measurer, Glasgow. He came as a scholar to the Infant Department of 
this School when it was first opened, and his whole School life was passed here. 
Being of an agreeable and sunny disposition, he was well liked, and is affectionately 
remembered. A few years after leaving School he joined the Lanarkshire Artillery 
Volunteers, and found in the ranks of the battery to which he was posted quite a 
number of his old School companions. 

At the outbreak of war in August, 1914, he enlisted in the Scottish Horse, 
and served in the Gallipoli campaign. He was invalided home with a severe attack 
of dysentery, and on his recovery was granted a commission in the Royal Naval 
Volunteer Reserve. During the war our coasts were patrolled by a fleet of swift 
motor launches manned by the R.N.V.R., and to one of these Herbertson was 
appointed, with headquarters in Bantry Bay and at Queenstown. He was on duty 
there from the beginning of 1916 until November, 1919. 

On the 30th of that month, while on his way to Southampton to be demobilised, 
the engine of the motor launch broke down and left it at the mercy of the waves. 

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As there was a heavy sea running at the time, the various boats of the flotilla had 
been compelled to part company, and this one was driven on to the dreadful reef at 
Longships Lighthouse, Land's End, and immediately broke in two. The lifeboat of 
the Royal National Lifeboat Association stationed at Sennen went to the rescue, 
and with great difficulty and gallantry succeeded in saving all the crew except 
Lieutenant Herbertson, who was seen to disappear just as help was at hand. 

HARRY JACK 

Private, 12th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) 

Harry Jack was the third son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Jack, 6 Rokeby Terrace, 
Hillhead. He received all his education in Hillhead High School, leaving it only 
at the close of 1916. He did not take an active part in any games owing to his weak 
eyesight, but he was interested in all the School's activities, and had a great regard 
for all his teachers. He was of a cheerful, contented, obliging disposition, and a great 
favourite with his comrades. On leaving School he entered the office of Messrs. 
Robert Ramsay & Co., Greendyke Street, where he remained till he was called up 
in March, 1917. He trained with the Scottish Rifles at Kirkcaldy and Nigg, and 
went to France in March, 1918, where he was attached to the Royal Scots. He 
visited the School shortly before going to the front, and had nothing but good things 
to say of his officers and comrades, and of Army life generally. This was quite 
characteristic of Harry. He made the best of everything and never a grumble 
escaped him. In the fierce fighting of 25th April, 1918, round Mount Kemmel he 
was reported missing, and later came the news that he was killed. No more gallant, 
simple-minded soldier fell that day, and his old School will ever hold him in honour. 

JOHN CHARLES A. JAMES 

Corporal, Hon. Artillery Company 

The only son of Mr. and Mrs. John F. James, Kingscot, High Wycombe, Bucks, 
John Charles A. James received his education at Hillhead High School. On leaving 
School he was apprenticed as a marine engineer, and later as an electrical engineer. 
When war was declared he was under contract to proceed to Calcutta as assistant 
superintendent engineer to a large shipping firm there, but the urgent call of King 
and country with him had first place, and by the 9th August, 1914, he had enlisted 
in the Hon. Artillery Company. He sailed for France on the 18th September, and 
continued there without a break till the 22nd September, 1915, when he came home 
on short leave. Returning to the front on the 26th September, Private James fell 
in action at Hooge on the 30th of the same month, aged twenty-five. He was highly 
popular with his comrades, and his commanding officer, writing to the bereaved 
parents, said, " If when my time comes I shall have served my King and country as 
well as your son has done I shall have done well." Many old boys remember Private 
James as a singularly winning personality, and deeply mourn his loss. 



DONALD R. F. LAMONT 

Sergeant, 1st Gordon Highlanders 

It is sometimes charged against Cadet Corps, Boys' Brigades, and Boy Scouts 
that they encourage the spirit of militarism in our youth. The School records are 

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far from bearing out this charge. The great majority of our former pupils have 
belonged to one or other of these organisations, some of them, indeed, to all three, 
yet, as far as is known, only four of our old boys before the war chose the Army as 
their career. Of these Sergeant Donald Lamont was one. He was a son of the late 
Captain Robert Lamont, a well-known master mariner in Port Bannatyne. He 
attended Hillhead High School from 1894 till 1899. After a short term in an office, 
he joined the 1st Gordons as a private. After a period of service in India, he 
returned with his regiment to England. On the outbreak of war he crossed with the 
first Expeditionary Force to France, and took part in the glorious deeds that marked 
the retreat from Mons to the Marne. The Gordons suffered very severely 
during these engagements, but Sergeant Lamont came through unhurt. At 
the Battle of the Marne the Gordons were again in the forefront of the 
fight, and Sergeant Lamont was very severely wounded. He spent over 
nine months in hospital at Plymouth, and after some time at a convalescent 
camp he was given a post as Army schoolmaster at Fort George. Last 
autumn his wounds broke afresh, and he was removed to Aberdeen Hospital, 
where he died on 5th February, 1918. Sergeant Lamont was veiy proud of his 
old School, and the School is no less proud of his gallantry in action and his fortitude 
in suffering. 



ARCHIE LANG 

Sergeant, 17th Battalion H.L.L 

Sergeant Archie Lang, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. John Lang, 49 Polwarth 
Gardens, Hyndland, was in his twenty-fourth year when he received his death-wound 
in the memorable assault on the German lines on the 1st July, 1916. His connection 
with Hillhead High School began in childhood, and may be said to have ended only 
with life. Just a few days before the great advance of 1st July he was one of the 
" band of brothers " who met in the Hotel Moderne in Picardy to commemorate 
their schooldays and to do honour to one of their number, Sergeant-Major Steven 
Reith, who had been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. The artistic menu 
card of that occasion, which has been reproduced in facsimile, was Sergeant Lang's 
work, and will be treasured by the School as a precious memorial of a unique occasion. 
At School he took a good place in his classes and a leading part in athletics and 
games. He was an enthusiastic Cadet, and rose to the rank of sergeant in the Corps. 
On leaving School he joined the F.P. Rugby team, and for years was a prominent 
figure in it. He was one of the famous three-quarter line which helped to win so 
many honours for the club. When war began he was training as a naval architect 
in the Leven Shipbuilding Yard, and had just passed his final course at the Technical 
College, taking the first place in the examination. He might have sheltered behind 
his scheduled occupation, but that was not Archie Lang's way. He was one of the 
first to join the Chamber of Commerce Battalion, in which he speedily rose to the 
rank of sergeant, and gained the admiration of his officers and the confidence of his 
men. His friend and comrade, Sergeant-Major Reith, of the same battalion, writes, 
" During the big advance on 1st July, he went on at least once after being hit. 
Later in the day he was brought in badly wounded in several places. He was, how- 
ever, expected to recover, but succumbed to his wounds on 28th July, and I lost my 
closest friend." Thus died a very gallant gentleman. 

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LEON E. LEVY 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 

Private Leon Levy's career as a soldier was short, but highly honourable. Only 
six months intervened between his enlistment and his death in action, but it 
was long enough to win for him the confidence of his officers and the admiration of 
his comrades. His company officer, in sending home the sad tidings of his death, 
states, " His death has come as a shock to us all. He was such a cheerful soldier 
and willing worker that every one who worked with him admired him. He was liked 
by all the officers, non-commissioned officers, and men of his company." But though 
his nominal period of soldiering was thus brief, it may be said of him that he was 
a soldier from his youth upwards. At School he was a keen Cadet, and when the 
Scout movement started he was an ardent supporter, and finally rose to be scout- 
master of the pioneer - troop, the 1st Glasgow. He was also a lieutenant in the 
Glasgow Cadet Brigade ("Jewish Lads' Corps). Private Levy may be said to have 
lived a dedicated life, a life dedicated to the service of youth. His was one of those 
transparent, unselfish natures, brimming over with ardour and zeal, that unfailingly 
attract the young of all ages. He was seldom to be seen in the streets without a 
crowd of youngsters round him, hanging to him as to an elder brother. Their grief 
at his passing was as touching as it was sincere, and, though dead, he will yet speak 
in and through the hearts and lives of his beloved boys. He was only twenty-one 
years of age, but in these days we must measure life by service and not by years. 



JOHN FRANCIS LOGAN 

2nd Lieutenant, 1st Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers 

Second Lieutenant John F. Logan was the elder son of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Logan, Restalrig, Bearsden. At School he took a good place in his classes and had 
an interest in all forms of sport. On leaving School he entered the service of Messrs. 
Mann, Byars & Co., and after gaining some experience there he began business for 
himself as a manufacturers' agent. When the Rugby Section of the School Club was 
started he was one of the first to join, and for some years was a prominent player in 
the 2nd XV. Volunteering also claimed his attention, and for five years he was an 
active member of the old 1st L.R.V., leaving it with the rank of corporal. Music 
and the drama had a great attraction for him, and for several years he was a member 
of the Glasgow Operatic Society and took part in many of its performances. Soon 
after war broke out he joined the Lanarkshire Yeomanry as a private, transferring 
later to the 7/8th K.O.S.B. With them he proceeded to France and came safely 
through the heavy fighting on the Somme in 1916. In 1917 he was, after a period 
of training at Lichfield, granted a commission in the 3rd Royal Scots Fusiliers. He 
returned to France in August of the same year and saw much fighting throughout the 
later months. During the great German advance in the spring of 1918 his battalion 
shared in the glory of stemming the onrush of the enemy, but at Locon on the 1 2th 
April he fell in action while gallantly leading his men. His School and the many 
friends who mourn his loss have the satisfaction of knowing that he contributed his 
full share to the victory that was already in sight when he fell. 



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PETER ALEXANDER EARLE M'CRACKEN 

Lieutenant, H.LJ. 

Lieutenant Peter A. E. M'Cracken was the youngest son of the late Mr. Peter 
M'Cracken and Mrs. M'Cracken, 2 C'olebrooke Street, Hillhead. At School and all 
through life he had a genius for friendship. His bright, buoyant nature, his dash, 
enthusiasm, and courage were magnetic. He took a creditable place in his classes, 
and a leading part in all forms of athletics and games. He was deeply attached to 
his old School, and as long as he remained in Glasgow was a prominent figure in the 
School Rugby field and tennis courts. In 1913 he left for Rangoon to join the firm 
of Messrs. Steel Brothers & Co. Soon after war was declared he came home and 
volunteered for active service. In September, 1915, he received his commission in 
the H.L.I. , and proceeded to France in the spring of 1916. It may easily be 
imagined that he proved an excellent soldier, devoted, zealous, loyal. Scouting was 
his joy and pride, and for his good work in that all-important part of military 
operations he was appointed Intelligence Officer to the battalion. On the 16th 
September, 1918, when " taking over " from the 1.0. of another battalion, the two 
went forward to reconnoitre, and were fired upon by an enemy patrol, and instan- 
taneously killed. His colonel, writing home, says, " Peter had been with us for a 
long time, and was the close personal friend of every officer in the battalion. We 
all loved and admired him for his proved bravery, for his sterling nature, and his 
purity of mind. The men had complete confidence in him, and would have followed 
him anywhere." Another officer comrade writes, " We have lost in your son a very 
gallant soldier, and a well-beloved comrade. All ranks in the battalion held him in 
high esteem and affection for his good cheer, his courage, his keenness, and his 
ability. He was never more content or happier than when surrounded by .his maps, 
sketches, and plans." Many will miss his presence when days of peace return, and 
will cherish all the more the memory of his chivalrous and gallant character. To 
his widowed mother and family the School tender the sincerest sympathy. 



REV. CHARLES GORDON MACDONALD, M.A. 

Lieutenant, 6th Battalion The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 

The death in action of Lieutenant C. Gordon Macdonald, following so soon on 
the tragic death by drowning of his father, our late headmaster, has deeply moved 
the School. Lieutenant Macdonald was a brilliant pupil at School, but not on 
conventional lines. He was marked from early years by the original and independent 
bent of his mind and by his abhorrence of well-worn grooves. At the University 
he showed the same independence, and shocked his professors and fellow-students 
by sitting for honours in English in the third year, a venture that usually spells 
disaster. Not so in his case, however, as he came out a brilliant first. The Church, 
with its old traditions and its new opportunities, had an irresistible attraction for 
his mystic and spiritual temperament. After a brilliant course in the Theological 
Hall he was appointed in May, 1914, as assistant in Hamilton Parish. There the 
world upheaval found him, and he was one of the first ministers in the Church to 
place himself unreservedly in the hands of the military authorities. After a lengthy 
training in this country, at the monotony of which he sometimes rebelled, he was 
sent to France, whence he wrote the cheeriest and brightest of letters. At Festubert 
on 15th June, 1915, while charging at the head of his men, he was mortally wounded. 
The chaplain writing home said, " Our battalion was put in the forefront of the 

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attack, and Lieutenant Macdonald was in the foremost company. He was very 
seriously wounded soon after they made the charge, and must have died almost 
immediately. The regiment has lost a valued officer, and I a valued friend and 

assistant." 

ARCHIE MACDOUGALL 

Captain, 8th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 

Captain Arch. MacDougall was the elder son of the late Mr. Alex. MacDougall, 
33 Cranworth Street, Hillhead. Like his brother and sisters he received all his 
education at Hillhead High School. He was one of those pupils who are equally 
distinguished in work and games, and School life was for him something of a 
triumphal procession. On leaving School he entered the office of Mr. A. M. 
Carstairs, chartered accountant, and in 1912 was admitted a member of the Institute 
of Accountants. He was one of the founders of the F.P. Rugby and Tennis Sections, 
and, as long as he remained in Glasgow, he was one of the most prominent players 
in the first teams. In 1913 he received a good appointment in London. There he 
kept up his interest in games and became a member of the London Scottish, playing 
for the first XV. in the three-quarter line. Later he went to Rangoon in the service 
of the Burma Oil Company. On the outbreak of war he at once joined the Mounted 
Volunteer Corps in Upper Burma, but service there was too far removed from the 
main struggle for his eager spirit, and in June, 1915, he returned home. He 
obtained a commission in the l/8th Scottish Rifles, and after a period of training at 
home he joined his battalion in Palestine. There he took part in the sweeping 
advance which secured for us the whole of Southern Palestine, including Jerusalem. 
He was slightly wounded in one of the engagements, but was soon able to rejoin his 
battalion. In March, 1918, he was transferred with his division to France. There 
he shared in some of the fiercest fighting in the war. Our continuous advance during 
the last four months of the war has somewhat obscured the fact that we had often 
to pay a terrific price for it. It was indeed almost at the eleventh hour of 
the war, the 31st October, that Archie MacDougall fell, just as he had suc- 
cessfully led his men to their final objective in a most difficult operation. His colonel 
said of him — " Captain MacDougall was one of the most likeable men I ever knew, 
and he was not only popular with both officers and men, but he had also their respect, 
without which a man cannot be a good officer. As a soldier he was cool, capable, 
and conscientious. I always knew that a job entrusted to him would be well done." 
Another officer of the battalion writes—-" I am guilty of no exaggeration when I tell 
you that ' Mac,' as he was affectionately called, was always one of the most popular 
officers the battalion ever had." The School will not willingly let fade the memory 
of one of its most gifted and loyal sons, who was also a gallant soldier and staunch 
friend. The heartfelt sympathy of the School is extended to his young widow, his 
sisters, and his brother. 



STEWART DUNSMORE MACDOUGALL 

Signalman, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve 

Stewart Dunsmore MacDougall was the elder son of Mr. James H. and Mrs. 
MacDougall, 11 Strathmore Gardens. He was educated at Brookfield School, 
Cumberland, and at Hillhead High School. Like many more Hillhead High School 
boys, he joined the Boy Scouts at the beginning of the movement, and was one of 

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the most efficient members of the signalling section of the First Glasgow Troop. He 
was passionately fond of outdoor life, and the call of the sea and the prairie came to 
him early. When only fifteen years of age he joined the Clyde Division of the 
R.N.V.R., and continued an active member of it up to the beginning of the war. In 
the summer of 1914 the opportunity he was looking for of embarking on a Colonial 
career came to him through an uncle in British Columbia. His kit was ready and 
his passage booked for the 16th August, 1914. Then came the opening of Arma- 
geddon, and he was mobilised with others of the Clyde Division, and incorporated 
in the Hood Battalion, Naval Brigade. When Volunteers were invited for the 
Antwerp expedition he at once came forward, and received his baptism of fire in that 
misguided venture. After a course of training as a signaller he was sent to 
Portsmouth Breakwater on boom defence work, where he remained for nearly two 
years. He was then transferred to the " Boxer," and was on board when she went 
to the bottom as the result of a collision. While in Portsmouth awaiting orders 
after this mishap, he volunteered for the Zeebrugge expedition which was fixed for 
23rd April, 1918. Stewart was of the true Nelson breed, for hardly had he escaped 
from one peril when he comes forward of his own accord to share in a still greater 
one. He was posted to the " Iris " as signaller, and had a strenuous time rehearsing 
for the great adventure. One of his comrades writes, " Two or three days before 
' the stunt ' came off the commander, Captain Valentine Gibbs, sent for Stewart, 
and, in the presence of the whole ship's company, presented him with the Mons 
Ribbon for being one of the Naval Brigade that took part in the defence of Antwerp." 
It is pleasing to think of the gallant Stewart sailing away on his last voyage with 
this ribbon on his breast. The rest of the story belongs to history. The " Iris " 
completed her mission, in spite of a tornado of shot and shell, but just as she was 
leaving the Mole a shell exploded on the bridge, killing the gallant Captain Valentine 
Gibbs and his no less heroic signaller. 



GEORGE CLAPPERTON M'EWAN 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force 

Lieutenant George C. M'Ewan was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. George A. 
M'Ewan. He was educated at Hillhead High School and Glasgow High School. He 
was as keen on his lessons as on sport, and in both he took a foremost place. Rugby, 
tennis, and golf all attracted him in their season, but like so many more of our boys 
he took an active interest in the Boy Scout movement. On leaving School he entered 
the offices of James Finlay & Co., East India merchants. When war was declared, 
being still under age, he joined the City Volunteers, first in the infantry and later 
in the mounted corps. As soon as he was eighteen years of age he joined the Royal 
Flying Corps as a cadet, training at Aldershot, Turnberry, and Montrose. He 
received his pilot's certificate in July, 1917, and after six months' flying and 
instruction in this country, he left for France. There he saw much service, and had 
many exciting experiences. In May, 1918, he came home on leave, and soon after 
returning to France he was posted missing, but no definite details of his fate have 
ever been received. His flight commander reports that while on a bombing expedi- 
tion with four others they were attacked far behind the enemy lines by forty-five 
Hun machines. For eighteen miles they kept up a running fight with the enemy, 
but before they reached their own lines Lieutenant M'Ewan's machine fell out of the 
formation, and was seen to turn half over on its back, apparently from engine 
trouble. The sorely tried survivors were too hard pressed to follow its after fate, 
but presumably it crashed, killing both pilot and observer. His captain writes — 

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" Your son was a great favourite with us all, and much admired as a pilot. He had 
done some really good work since joining us, and I am quite sure he would have 
gone far had he been spared." 



FINLAY D. MACINNES 
Private, 31st Alberta Battalion, C.E.F. 

JOHN F. MACINNES 
Private, 28th Battalion, C.E.F. 

These two brothers, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Finlay Machines, 6 Lawrence Place, 
began and ended their School career at Hillhead High School. Finlay, on leaving 
School, joined his father in business, but the spirit of adventure was strong in him 
and he left for Canada, where he settled down to farming. He succeeded so well 
that soon he had a farm of his own. Farmers in this country regard themselves as 
indispensable, but this gallant son of Empire thought the fighting line was the only 
indispensable place, and as soon as he was able to make arrangements for carrying 
on his farm he joined the colours. After a short period of training in Canada and 
England he crossed to France, and entered the trenches two days before the Battle 
of Loos. He came safely through, but was killed by a shell on the 13th October, 
1915, while engaged in digging out some of his comrades who had been buried in 
the ground during the bombardment. 

John F. Maclnnes, on leaving School, entered the service of the Union Castle 
Line. After an apprenticeship of four years, he too went to Canada, and held 
various positions there. When war began he was in the United States, but even 
there he heard the call of duty, and gave instant response. He went to France soon 
after his brother, and was in the trenches for six months before meeting his death 
on 5th April, 1916. The gallant brothers were typical pioneers of Empire, indus- 
trious in the arts of peace, but not " too proud to fight " for the right. 



JOHN M'INTOSH 

2nd Lieutenant, R.G.A. 

Second Lieutenant John M'Intosh was the elder son of Mr. and Mrs. John A. 
M'Intosh, 38 Bishop's Road, Jordanhill. At School he was noted for his loyal, 
upright character, his sunny nature, and his quiet, courteous manners. His interests 
at School were many sided, but the great names in English literature had a special 
fascination for him, and in their study and exposition he hoped to find his life work. 
The Photographic Club in connection with the School was largely his creation, and 
to the last he took an active interest in its welfare. Besides photography, he had 
two other hobbies, cycling and music, and into each he entered with his usual zest. 
On leaving School he entered Glasgow University, intending to study for an Honour's 
Degree in English, and during his first term gained the Lanfine Bursary as the most 
distinguished student of his year in this subject. In his case, as in so many others, 
war came to interrupt his studies and to cut short his course. He received a 
commission in the Royal Garrison Artillery, and surely never was there a more 
devoted and cheerier soldier. Last autumn he went to France and sent back the 
brightest of letters. Writing to the headmaster he said, " I have fallen in with 

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good quarters, good food, interesting work, and, most important of all, fine company, 
both officers and men. The battery has had a very heavy time of it, but, in spite 
of that, they are all bright and cheery, thankful for quieter times and a whole skin. 
They are just a real British lot freshened up again by a short spell of what they call 
rest, but what would seem to folks at home jolly hard work." In the same letter 
he promises if he can at all find time to write a short article for the School Magazine. 
But it was otherwise willed. On the 11th April, 1918, the Germans began their 
great thrust for the Channel ports, and John M'Intosh fell in a gallant attempt to 
stem the onrush when the Portuguese lines broke. A fellow officer writes, " As 
always, on that morning nothing kept him back from doing the right thing. His 
life was ended in an endeavour to carry out the highest duty of an officer, that of 
conveying an order himself rather than risk the lives of his men — a heroic deed, 
none the less great because unrecorded in official records." His commanding 
officer says, " He died doing his duty most bravely under exceptionally trying 
circumstances. Those of us who are left will feel his loss greatly. I cannot say 
enough of his work in the short time he has been with me." And so in death as in 
life John M'Intosh proved himself " a veray parfit, gentil knight." 



PETER M'INTYRE 

Private, 2nd Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders 

Private Peter M'Intyre was the eldest son of the late Captain M'Intyre and 
Mrs. M'Intyre, 437 Great Western Road. At School he was a quiet, retiring youth, 
with strong artistic tastes. While at School he obtained a Bursary for Drawing, and 
continued his Art studies for several years in evening classes. On leaving School 
he entered the office of Mr. John H. Stewart, factor, 116 St. Vincent Street. When 
war was declared he offered himself for enlistment, but was rejected because of his 
eyesight. In 1915 he was more successful, and was posted to the 15th Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders. In July, 1916, he was sent to France, and attached to 
the second battalion of the same regiment. He came safely through the heavy 
fighting of the next two years, but on the 24th September, 1918, when the end was 
already in sight, he was killed at .Villars-Geshlin. Private M'Intyre's father, a 
master mariner, who kept to the sea in spite of the fact that his vessel was torpedoed 
more than once and he himself posted as lost, finally met his death by enemy action 
in the Straits of Messina in January, 1918. The heartfelt sympathy of the School 
goes out to Mrs. M'Intyre and family in this double bereavement. 



FRANK R. MACKENZIE 

2nd Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. Seaforth Highlanders 
(Ross-shire Buffs, The Duke of Albany's) 

Frank R. Mackenzie was a pupil in Hillhead High School during the years 
1895-99. On leaving School he entered the employment of Messrs. J. & W. 
Campbell, warehousemen, Ingram Street, Glasgow. He was an enthusiastic Volun- 
teer, and served for nearly ten years in the 1st L.R.V. and 5th Scottish Rifles. In 
August, 1915, he joined the University O.T.C., and in November obtained a com- 
mission in the 10th Seaforth Highlanders. After a short period of training he 
went to France in March, 1916, and was attached to the 2nd Seaforth Highlanders. 
In the Big Push of 1st July, 1916, the Seaforths broke far into the enemy's lines, 

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but were unable to hold all the ground they had gained. The major of the 
battalion states that Lieutenant Mackenzie fell wounded in the advance close to the 
third German trenches. When the regiment was compelled to retreat he was seen 
in a shell hole with a bandage round his head, but they were unable to bring him 
back to the British lines. The hope was expressed that he had been picked up by 
the German Red Cross, but no word has since been heard of him, and it is now 
presumed he must have been killed by a shell. The uncertainty surrounding his 
fate must still be an agony to his wife and sisters, with whom the deepest sympathy 
is felt. Lieutenant Mackenzie was an earnest student of social questions, and took 
a deep and active interest in all social and religious work for the uplifting of the 
young in the poorer districts of the city. 



ROBERT C. MACKENZIE 

Private, 6th. Battalion H.L.L 

Robert C. Mackenzie, son of Captain Mackenzie, A.S.C., and Mrs. Mackenzie, 
formerly 28 Lansdowne Crescent, and now Lamont House, Macduff, was a quiet, 
reserved, studious, and sensitive youth when at School, and took but little interest 
in the games of the playing field and playground. Notwithstanding his mask of 
reserve, he made a strong impression on all his teachers, who recognised his real 
strength of character and tenacity of purpose. This war has brought many surprises, 
but perhaps none more striking than the seeming transformation of some natures, 
making of modest, retiring, diffident men confident, forceful, and valiant soldiers. 
It may be that, as in Robert Mackenzie's case, the steel was there all the time, 
but sheathed, or it may be that a strong sense of duty can rise superior to natural 
inclinations, tastes, and habits, and can temper and edge the most refractory metal. 
Whichever way it be, certain it is that Robert Mackenzie gave ample proof of " the 
mettle of his pasture." At the beginning of the war, though still under seventeen 
years of age, he enlisted in the ranks, choosing as his regiment the 6th H.L.L, 
because of its connection with his old School. After eight months' training in this 
country he was sent to Egypt and then to Gallipoli. Here, like so many more of 
his Schoolfellows, he fell in his first fight on the slopes of Achi Baba on 12th July, 
1915. The School, with mingled pride and sorrow, pays homage to her young 
hero. 

GEORGE A. C. MACKINLAY, M.A. 

Private, 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 

George A. C. Mackinlay, M.A., who was the eldest son of Mr. George 
Mackinlay, 65 Bank Street, Hillhead, was killed in France on the 15th August, 
1917. Educated at Hillhead High School, he proceeded to Glasgow University, 
where he graduated M.A., with honours in English Literature, Language, and 
History in 1912. In 1913 he was appointed assistant English master in Perth 
Academy, which post he held till he joined the Army in 1914. It is no secret now 
to say that the headmaster was hoping to see him on the first available opportunity 
established as one of the English masters in his old School. He was at all times a 
keen sportsman, and entered fully into the athletic and social life of the School, 
both as a pupil and as a member of the Former Pupils' Club. An enthusiastic 
player of Rugby, a leading member of the Literary Association, whose Magazine he 
founded and edited, he was perhaps one of the best and most widely known of the 

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former pupils of the School. To those who knew him there is no need to praise 
him, but some things may be recalled in tribute to his memory. Among all those 
whom the School is proud to honour there was no truer gentleman than George 
Mackinlay. Clean-minded, generous-hearted as boy and man, he was never known 
to do a mean act or to take an ignoble view of life. A poet and a dreamer at heart, 
he took the best out of life, its beauty and its joy, and seemed to carry with him 
some of its sunshine. As a memorial of this gallant soldier and scholar a small 
volume of his poems has been published. This for his friends — but for himself — 

"He hath outsoared the shadow of our night." 



ROBERT GALLOWAY M'KINLAY 

2nd Lieutenant, 10th Battalion H.L.I. 

Robert Galloway M'Kinlay was deeply attached to his old School. He lived 
beside it, he obtained all his education in it, and after he formally severed connection 
with it he was still frequently to be found as a welcome visitor within its walls. 
He was an ardent member of the School Officers' Training Corps, and when war 
broke out he at once joined Lochiel's Camerons as a private. After some months' 
training he was granted a commission in the 12th Battalion H.L.I. Subsequently 
he was transferred to the 10th Battalion, and left for France in July, 1915. Like 
so many more of his comrades and friends, he fell at Loos, 26th September, 1915, 
while gallantly leading on his men. He was a bright and cheerful spirit, full of 
happiness himself, and spreading happiness all around. Now he sleeps in the fields 
of France, one of the great army who have acquitted themselves like men, and 
have left the memory of duty nobly done. 



MALCOLM M'KINNON 

Bombardier, R.F.A. 

Bombardier Malcolm M'Kinnon was the only son of Mrs. M'Kinnon, 4 Edmiston 
Terrace, Ibrox. On leaving School he prepared for the teaching profession, receiving 
his training in the U.F. College and Glasgow University, and on finishing his course 
he was appointed to Ibrox School, where he remained till the autumn of 1915, when 
he enlisted in the R.F.A. His favourite pastimes were swimming and golf, but his 
main interest, even out of School, was with the boys who passed through his hands. 
To them he was an elder brother, sharing in all their interests, guiding their 
aspirations, and directing their preparations for life. When they left School many 
of them still turned to him as their counsellor and friend, and he was prodigal of 
his efforts to do them service. After nine months' training in this country he left 
for France in June, 1916. The privations and hardships of a two-winters' campaign 
failed to break his bright and hopeful spirit. During the fierce fighting round 
Passchendaele last summer he rendered valuable service, and was mentioned in 
dispatches. On the 18th January, 1918, he was struck by a piece of shrapnel and 
died immediately. A wide circle of friends and a grateful band of former pupils 
will not willingly let fade the memory of this gallant soldier, loyal friend, and 
devoted master. The sympathies of the School go out in rich measure to his 
widowed mother. 

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ALEXANDER M'LACHLAN 

Private, 5th Battalion The Gordon Highlanders 

Private Alexander M'Lachlan, who was the youngest son of Mrs. M'Lachlan, 
44 St. Vincent Crescent, received his education at Hillhead High School and Allan 
Glen's. At School he was an enthusiastic Cadet, and took a keen interest in all 
forms of games. In January, 1917, when he was of age, he joined the Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders. After a very short period of training he proceeded to 
France in April, and passed at once into the firing line. In July he was wounded 
and sent home. On his recovery he again returned to France, and was attached to 
the 5th Gordons, who formed part of the famous 51st Division. He shared in the 
fierce fighting which marked the great German advance of March, 1918. There the 
Gordons covered themselves with glory, the commander-in-chief writing — " They 
made a glorious stand fighting a rearguard action in order that others might retreat." 
Private M'Lachlan was reported as wounded and a prisoner, but no further word 
from or of him was ever received, and the War Office finally posted him as " pre- 
sumed killed." Much sympathy is felt for his mother, sisters, and brother in their 
long and trying period of anxiety. 

J. M'LAGAN B.Sc. 

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Engineers 

Second Lieutenant J. M'Lagan was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. M'Lagan, 
11 Sutherland Street, Hillhead. He came to Hillhead High School in 1901 and 
passed through all the classes in the School, leaving in 1911. Throughout the course 
he proved himself to be a pupil of much promise, and took a foremost place in all 
his classes. Games claimed his attention as much as books, and he was a regular 
member of the Rugby and Cricket teams. His ability, sincerity, and frankness 
made him a favourite with all his fellows, who were all sure James would " make 
good." On leaving School he entered the University with the intention of taking 
his B.Sc. in Engineering. He was a member of the O.T.C. when war broke out, but 
was reported unfit for service owing to the effects of a severe illness he had had the 
previous year. In April, 1915, he was capped B.Sc, and received his commission 
in June of the same year in the Highland Field Company of the Royal Engineers, 
whose headquarters are in Jardine Street. Later he was transferred to the Lowland 
Field Company, with which he proceeded to Witham, Essex, where he had charge 
of a company erecting barbed wire entanglements and machine gun emplacements. 
After a course of bombing on Clapham Common he returned to his old unit as 
bombing instructor. There, through the accidental bursting of a bomb, he was 
instantaneously killed, 8th June, 1916, and a career of bright promise brought to a 
close ere it was yet noon day. His colonel, writing to his parents, says — " During 
the fortnight previous to his tragic death he was almost continuously beside me as 
assistant adjutant. I had thus full opportunity to appreciate his sterling worth of 
uprightness, and I can assure you that his death is not only a personal loss and grief 
to me, but a loss to the Army." Major Jackson writes — " He was one of the best 
officers and most conscientious performers of duty that ever I came across. No work 
I could give him was too hard, and no obstacle was too complicated for him to 
overcome, and when I gave orders I knew that they would be rigidly obeyed." 
Many other touching tributes were received from brother officers and men, all going 
to prove that the fine qualities which endeared J. M'Lagan to his School-fellows had 
stood the rude test of Camp and Army life. 

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THOMAS DUNCAN OGILVIE MACLAGAN, M.C. 
Captain, London Scottish 

Captain T. D. 0. Maclagan was one of the best known and most esteemed of 
the older generation of Former Pupils. As boy and man he was noted for his 
attractive personality, his deep fund of sympathy, and his high sense of duty. In 
his day games did not bulk largely in the School programme, but he took full advan- 
tage of such facilities as were provided, and was largely responsible for the formation 
of the swimming section, the earliest athletic endeavour associated with the School. 
He was a life member of the Hillhead High School Club, and maintained his interest 
in all connected with it to the last. In civil life he was attached to the Foreign and 
Colonial Branch of the Secretary's Office, St. Martins le Grand, London. As his 
business took him frequently abroad, he made a special study of languages, for 
which an excellent foundation had been laid in his School days. His former chief, 
writing on seeing the announcement of his death, says, " Your son was for some 
thirteen years attached to this office, where he did much useful and excellent work. 
We have missed his services greatly since 1914, when he was one of the first to leave 
us, and we have all followed his military career with the greatest interest, and have 
felt proud of the many honours which he won." Lord Roberts kept himself fit up 
to the last years of his life by systematic training, declaring that he always felt he 
should be thoroughly prepared against the day when his country would need his 
services. We do not know whether Captain Maclagan had any such premonition 
of a call upon his manhood, but certainly no one ever took greater pains to make 
and keep himself perfectly fit for any emergency. He was a member of the Civil 
Service Rugby Club, and played in their 1st XV., both in England and France. He 
was also a keen cricketer and tennis player. From the outset the military spirit 
was strong within him. For fifteen years he was an enthusiastic member of the 
London Scottish, and took part in some of their famous marches throughout 
Scotland. He was mobilised with his unit when war broke out, and in October, 
1914, he went to France. He was wounded at the first Battle of Ypres, and paid a 
visit to his old School during convalescence. The headmaster well remembers his 
powerful, athletic frame and gallant bearing, and felt that here indeed was one born 
to lead a forlorn hope or storm an enemy stronghold. He was soon awarded a 
commission in his old regiment, and was one of the first of our Old Boys to gain the 
Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in planning and carrying out a raid on the 
German trenches. Later he went with his battalion to Salonica, and thence to 
Palestine. There he was awarded a bar to his Military Cross for the brilliant manner 
in which he handled his company during the advance on Jerusalem. For general 
good service during the Palestine campaign he received the " Order of the Nile " 
from the Egyptian Government. He was killed on 30th April, 1918. 

Captain Maclagan was the second son of the late Thomas Maclagan, Telegraphs, 
Glasgow and Manchester, and Mrs. Maclagan, 14 Park Corner, Glasgow, W. His 
loss is deeply mourned by his old School who are justly proud of the many honours 
which he won. Their sincerest sympathies go out towards his mother and brothers. 

RONALD GORDON MACLAREN 

Lance-Corporal, l/6th H.L.I. 

Lance-Corporal Ronald Gordon MacLaren had just completed his twenty-second 
year when he received his death wound on the slopes of Achi Baba during the 
memorable charge against the Turkish positions on the 10th July, 1915. His 
connection with Hillhead High School was continuous from childhood to the com- 

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pletion of his studies. He was as keen on his lessons as on his games, and won 
distinction in both, gaining a scholarship, and being elected captain of the School 
cricket team. When war broke out he was acting as freight clerk to Messrs. James 
Little & Co., shipowners and shipbrokers. With him there was never any doubt 
as to where his duty lay. His one thought was to join the regiment most likely to 
be first in action, and so he joined the 1/6 th H.L.I. , and so also he now lies still in 
far-off Gallipoli. His friend, Private Bertie Barry, in a letter to the stricken mother 
says, " I found him in one of the trenches after the charge, and he asked me if I 
would write you in case anything further happened to him. At that time I told 
him there was no necessity for that, as if sheer pluck could pull any one through it 
should certainly have done so in his case. I really think he was the bravest boy I 
ever met. He never thought anything about his own wounds, but wanted to know 
how all the other boys were getting on — a real hero." In death as in life he upheld 
the honour of his name and the prestige of his School, and has left to his friends the 
memory of a glad, pure, radiant life. 



ALEXANDER MURCHISON MACLEAN 
Captain, Scottish Horse and Flight Commander, R.A.F. 

Captain A. M. Maclean was the second son of Professor Magnus Maclean, 51 
Kersland Street. He was educated at Hillhead High School, where his frank and 
generous nature won for him a host of friends. He took a keen interest in all School 
sports, and played a prominent part in all games. He specially excelled in the art 
of swimming, and was not only School champion, but also champion of his year in 
the Western Baths. On leaving School he entered the service of Messrs. Gellatly, 
Hankey & Co., where at the early age of nineteen he was appointed cashier. He 
still kept up his interest in the School, playing Rugby for the Former Pupils, and 
joining with some of his classmates the University O.T.C. In June, 1912, he joined 
the firm of Messrs. Balfour, Williamson & Co., London, and his abilities were soon 
recognised by rapid promotion, and in April, 1913, he sailed for South America to 
take up an important post for the same firm in Coronel, Chili. There he remained 
till the outbreak of hostilities. 

As the enemy's warships were known to be cruising in Chilian waters, it was 
impossible to obtain a passage to this country, so, along with two others who were 
determined to enlist, he left for Santiago to get a train across the Continent. Un- 
fortunately, the service was for the time being cancelled owing to heavy snowfalls 
in the mountain regions. Determined not to be baffled and not to be delayed, they, 
with the help of guides, made the trying and perilous journey over the Andes on 
mule back. There they boarded a train for Buenos Ayres, and thence to London. 

He was at once commissioned to the Scottish Horse, and proceeded soon after 
to Egypt and Gallipoli. For his services in the latter place he was recommended 
for the Military Cross by Brigadier-General Tullibardine, who sent him a personal 
note saying — " I would like you to know how much I personally appreciate your 
good work for the Brigade." Later he was seconded for duty with the Black Watch 
at Salonica, and in 1916 he transferred to the R.A.F. , with which he served in Egypt 
and France. On 12th April, 1918, during the critical time of the German push for 
the Channel ports, he was sent out on a low reconnaissance mission over the battle 
front, and never returned. Later, when some of his effects were returned, the R.O. 
wrote — " Although he had only been with us for a very short time, he was already 
a popular and trusted member of the squadron." No authentic news of his fate has 
ever been received. The hope was long entertained that he might be a wounded 

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prisoner in Germany, but in September, 1919, the Air Ministry regretfully announced 
that they must presume his death. 

The story of this gallant soldier who braved privations and hardships and perils 
to come to the defence of the Motherland, and who was privileged to render her 
service on so many widely separated battle fronts, will ever touch the imagination 
and heart of pupils of the School. 

DONALD MACLEAN 

2nd Lieutenant, The Cameronians 

The report of the death in action of Second Lieutenant Donald MacLean 
aroused profound sorrow in the School. It seemed but the other day that he was 
in our midst " going round the classes," as he, himself said in his last letter to the 
headmaster, " collecting the money for soldiers' comforts, and then proceeding to 
the very difficult task of adding up the totals ! ' ' His was a singularly attractive and 
lovable nature. His good temper and sang froid were unshakable, and his sense 
of humour exceptionally keen, the twinkle in his eye proclaiming a coming sally long 
before it crystallised in speech. In word and deed he was " steel true and blade 
straight," and had the staunch affection and unwavering confidence of all his 
comrades. Though endowed with no natural quickness, he never rested till he had 
mastered his difficulties, and in the end he graduated from the School with high 
distinction. He early joined the O.T.C. (Junior Section), and steadily rose through 
the various grades to that of Company Sergeant-Major. During session 1916-17 he 
acted as business manager of the School Magazine, and never was the work better 
done. He was a prominent figure on the Rugby field, where his dash, resolution, 
and speed made him an ideal three-quarter. In September last he joined the O.C.B. 
at Gailes, and after a course of training there he was posted to the 1st Scottish Rifles. 
On his last visit to the School before crossing to France every one was struck with 
his tall, lithe figure and gallant bearing. He came safely through much heavy 
fighting on the Western Front, but on the 21st September, during an attack on the 
German lines near Cambrai, he fell at the head of his men. His commanding officer, 
the Hon. Harold Ritchie, who was himself mortally wounded in the same battle, 
wrote from hospital regarding him, " He endeared himself to all, and the care which 
he devoted to his men and the efficiency with which he carried out his work will 
cause him to be greatly missed and mourned both by officers and men." Colonel 
Wingate, a former CO., writing to the headmaster, says, " Among a good lot I 
know none better than young MacLean, and I took a very strong liking to him. At 
all times he was smart and efficient, and I was particularly struck with two things — 
the good care he took of his men and the courage and skill he showed on patrol at 
night." Brigadier-General Mayne and Major Kirkwood also sent letters of sympathy 
and regret at the loss of a most promising officer. He was the elder son of Mr. 
Donald MacLean, Headmaster, Govan High School, and of Mrs. MacLean, 83 
Marlborough Avenue, Glasgow, W. 

W. A. MACLEAN, M.A. 

2nd Lieutenant, 1st Battalion H.L.I. 

Second Lieutenant MacLean, the fourth son of the late Rev. E. MacLean and of 
Mrs. MacLean, 52 Southbrae Drive, Jordanhill, was born in 1887 in Newport (Mon.). 
He was educated, first at Hillhead High School and later at Fettes College, Edin- 
burgh. On leaving School he took his Arts course at Glasgow University, where he 

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graduated M.A. in 1906. While at the University he took an active part in its 
social life. He was president of the Temperance Society, and in connection with the 
Students' Settlement he started and carried on for several winters the children's play 
evening. After qualifying as C.A. he joined the staff of Nobel's Explosive Company, 
Limited. While at the University, and for some years thereafter, he was a keen 
member of the Officers' Training Corps, where he held the rank of sergeant. On the 
outbreak of war he at once volunteered for service, and early in September was 
gazetted to the 3rd Battalion H.L.I. , and after a course of training joined the 1st 
Battalion in France. He was killed in action near Neuve Chapelle on the 14th 
March, 1915. He took a very active interest in the various agencies in connection 
with Hillhead Baptist Church. He had a genius for friendship, and his early death 
is mourned by a very wide circle. 

ROBERT LINDSAY M'MUTRIE 

Lieutenant (Acting Captain), The Royal Scots Fusiliers 

Lieutenant R. Lindsay M'Mutrie was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. R. L. 
M'Mutrie, Milrig, Cardonald. According to the testimony of all his teachers he was 
one of the most brilliant pupils who have passed through the School. Every- 
thing he did had a certain note of distinction, and his exercises were models of 
method and style. But he was no mere bookworm. In cricket and swimming he 
was in the front rank, and captained one of the best polo teams the School has had. 
Music and photography also claimed his interest, and in each he was a brilliant 
executant. On leaving School he entered on his business career in an insurance office 
in Glasgow, and in 1912 he left for a post in the head office of the Crown Life Insur- 
ance Company of Toronto. There his abilities found ample scope, and his promotion 
was rapid. Soon after war began he returned home to do his " bit." One of his 
first visits was to the old School, and the headmaster vividly recalls the strong 
impression made on him by this volunteer from overseas. Strength of character and 
brightness of disposition, proof against all the slings and arrows of fortune, looked 
out from every feature. On completing his training, he received a commission in 
the 6th Royal Scots Fusiliers, and left for France in June, 1915. After a period of 
strenuous fighting he received an appointment as Town Major at Molliens-au-bois. 
This, after the trying life of the trenches, he enjoyed to the full, and he had many 
amusing stories to tell of his experiences. He was gazetted full lieutenant in July, 

1917, and was transferred to the 1st Royal Scots Fusiliers. Early this year he was 
appointed acting captain, and he fell at the head of his men on the 21st August, 

1918, in a big attack at Courcelles-le-Comte. Many letters have been received from 
brother officers speaking of the high regard in which he was held as a soldier and a 
man. Captain M'Innes Shaw, M.C., writes, " He was one of the few personal 
friends I have now left. We had so many happy days together in the 6/7th that his 
loss is all the more severe. I can assure you he did his duty during the last show, 
as he always did, full of keenness and courage. His men, or the very few who were 
left, spoke of his leadership, and in losing him we have lost one of the real fine type 
of officers, one of the old hands of whom few are left." 

WILLIAM M'NEIL 

Corporal, 5th Scottish Rifles 

Corporal William M'Neil will be best known to many of the old pupils as the 
younger brother of the late Brodie M'Neil, who did so much for the success of the 

N 165 



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School Club in its early yeais. Corporal M'Neil was a quiet, studious boy, and took 
little part in the athletic life of the School. On leaving School he entered the 
warehouse of Stewart & Macdonald, Limited, and was held in high regard by all 
in his department. He took a keen interest in the welfare of the young, and for 
years was a most enthusiastic officer in the Boys' Brigade. He was also an ardent 
Territorial. He saw much hard fighting in France before he fell in action on the 
31st July, 1916. A devoted son and brother, and a staunch and loyal friend, he 
has left the example of duty nobly and unselfishly performed. 



ANDREW FERGUSON MARSHALL 
Lewis Gunner, Scottish Rifles 

Andrew F. Marshall, elder son of Mr. Andrew F. Marshall, 30 Blythswood 
Drive, Glasgow, was well known to many of the present pupils, who vividly recall 
his attractive and lovable nature. Self-possessed, reserved, silent, he gave the 
impression of much strength of character and of a fine nature. To good ability he 
joined steady application and great determination, qualities which seldom fail to 
secure advancement in any sphere of life. He did not take any part in the regular 
School games, but was a keen golfer, and gave promise of becoming a really first- 
rate player. He was also a devoted Scout, and when war broke out he gave three 
months to doing Scout duty with the Army. 

On leaving School he joined the Turkey Red Company, where he remained 
until he was eighteen years of age, when he joined the Scottish Rifles. He specialised 
in the Lewis gun, in the working of which he became so expert that he was offered 
the post of instructor. But Andrew, for all his reserve, had the spirit of adventure 
strong within him, and he applied to be allowed to proceed to France. His career 
there was short but honourable. He left Folkestone on the 16th March, 1918, and 
on the 16th April he fell " somewhere " in France while carrying a dispatch through 
a heavy barrage. His last letter home gave a vivid description of the congestion 
of traffic as he advanced to the Front lines to help to stay the rush of the Germans. 
" On the road were motors (heaps of them), motor bikes, troops, horses, wounded, 
Chinese labourers, Australians, refugees (poor people, I was sorry for them), hurry- 
ing along carrying their belongings, or pushing them in small carts — the sort of 
thing that gets one's back up." " I will never forget that march," he goes on to 
say, " on we staggered, yes staggered, could hardly say walked, for with the extra 
load I and many more were about dead beat." Then comes out the fine British 
spirit that has pulled us through all our troubles. " However, I am sticking it fine, 
quite cheery, always thinking of you, and generally making the best of it." Vow 
avez maintenu. 



ALLAN GOW MARSHALL 

Captain, 17th H.L.L 

Captain Allan Gow Marshall was a pupil in Hillhead High School for about 
seven years. He then proceeded to the Royal High School, Edinburgh, where he 
greatly distinguished himself, gaining prizes in modern languages and becoming 
captain of the School XV. On leaving School he studied in Germany for a year 

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and then returned to take up business in Glasgow. He ultimately became a director 
and secretary of the firm of James Marshall, Limited, Glasgow, and took an active 
part in its management. His other activities mainly centred round his church, 
Woodlands United Free, and its mission in the north of the city, to which he gave 
the most devoted and faithful service. At the outbreak of war, though he might 
well, in view of his training and education, have waited for a commission, he joined 
the 17th H.L.I. (Chamber of Commerce Battalion) as a private. After some 
months in the ranks he was granted a commission in the same battalion, a rare and 
coveted honour. After a period of training at home he joined his unit in France 
in the summer of 1916. He took part with his battalion in the fighting on the 
Somme, and was gazetted captain in the autumn of that year. On the 12th 
February, 1917, he was killed by a sniper's bullet while out reconnoitring the 
enemy's positions. His commanding officer wrote — " To me personally he was a 
standby who could always be depended upon. He was imbued with the ideals of the 
17th, and always lived up to them. To refer to his example of bravery as shown in 
his daily life in the line, or his devotion to duty, seems trifling. His spirit embodied 
these qualities to the fullest extent, and were natural to him. That explains why 
he was so much beloved and respected by us all." A brother officer pays him the 
following tribute: — " Nobody could know him without loving him — he was always 
so cheery and unselfish, so good to his men, and so ready to do any one a good turn." 
The sincere sympathy of the School and a wide circle of friends is extended to his 
widow and infant son. 



WILLIAM STANLEY MARTIN 

Private, 1st Garrison Battalion, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) 

Private William Stanley Martin died of pneumonia following influenza in No. 17 
General Hospital, Alexandria, Egypt, on 10th January, 1919, after having served 
throughout the whole war. Private Martin was the eldest of three soldier sons of 
Sir William and Lady Martin, 24 Atholl Gardens, Kelvinside, Glasgow, and was an 
old time Volunteer. Prior to the war he served for nine years in the 9th H.L.I. , 
retiring in 1913. Although his health was none too robust, he re-enlisted in his 
old batatlion early in September, 1914, and at once volunteered for foreign service. 
He served in various places in this country up to December, 1917, when he was 
drafted to the 1st Garrison Battalion, Royal Scots, and went to Egypt in December, 
1917. 

Private Martin was an acute observer of men and things, and his judgments 
and forecasts of what was going to happen in political and social life were remarkably 
accurate. He chafed a good deal at being kept at home so long, when his two 
younger brothers were fighting in France. He was indeed a gallant fighter, and, 
had his physical ability been equal to his willingness, he would undoubtedly have 
distinguished himself. 

Private Martin was a young man of marked individuality, who took his own 
view on all subjects, and was prepared to defend it against all comers. He was a 
good son and a staunch friend, and laid down his life for his country as surely as if 
he had fallen on the field of battle. His two younger brothers, Captain C. Kingsley 
Martin, 9th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and Lieut. A. Wellesley Martin, 
18th H.L.I. , served in France till the end of the war. Private Martin was associated 
with his father in shipping business. His death is mourned by a wide circle of 
friends, and very specially by his old schoolfellows and his old School, who will ever 
cherish his memory. 

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Hillhead High School 



FREDERICK THOMAS MATHER 

Private, 16th Batt. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) 

Private Fred. T. Mather, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Mather, 35 Airlie Gardens, 
Hyndland, received his education at Hillhead High School. Of a quiet, unassuming 
disposition, " Freddie," as he was familiarly called by his schoolmates, endeared 
himself to his fellows by his frank, open nature and kindly ways. Ever ready for 
frolic and fun, he was foremost in all boyish sport. He took part in all School 
games, entering into them with keen zest and fine spirit, and had his weight been 
equal to his keenness he would have been included in the School XV. The form of 
sport in which he excelled was swimming. He was a " duck " in the water, and 
many a dour tussle he had in the School swimming pond. He was a member of the 
Boys' Brigade, and lavished on his company all the enthusiasm and tireless energy 
of his nature. He was on the point of receiving a lieutenancy in his company when 
he was called to the Army. In -February, 1917, he joined the Forces, and in 
December of the same year crossed to France. He was in the front line at Croiselles 
at the start of the German offensive of March, 1918, and after the action at Armen- 
tieres in the April following, he was posted as missing. Since then no news of his 
whereabouts has been received, and he is presumed to have been killed on that date. 
His schoolmates and friends will cherish with sorrowful pride the memory of one 
who everywhere and always " played the game." 



ARTHUR CLIFFORD MECHAN 

Lance-Corporal, 5th Battalion The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 

Lance-Corporal Arthur Clifford Mechan was the only son of the late Dr. Mechan 
and Mrs. Mechan, 12 Victoria Crescent, Dowanhill. At School he was a good sport 
in the best sense of the term. Though not bookish, he always made a good appear- 
ance in the class room and took a creditable place in his examinations. He was 
straightforward and reliable, and whatever he attempted was seen to be done to the 
best of his ability. He was keen on all forms of sport, and excelled at the long jump, 
for which as a schoolboy he held the record, 19 feet. He had just completed his 
apprenticeship as an engineer when the call to arms sounded. Clifford had a high 
sense of duty, and the writer was not surprised when in the first days of the war 
he was stopped in the street by Clifford and three other former pupils and told they 
had enlisted as privates in Lochiel's Camerons. Two of the four never returned. 
At Loos Lochiel's Camerons covered themselves with glory, but at a heavy price. 
Lance-Corporal Mechan was posted missing, and the most diligent inquiries failed 
to learn any more of him than that he had been wounded and left in a dug-out. 
When his comrades returned the dug-out had disappeared. He was a loyal friend 
and staunch comrade, and his death is mourned by a wide circle of friends. The 
sincere sympathy of the whole School goes out to his widowed mother. 



JAMES ADAMS MILLER 

Engine-Room Artificer R.N.R. 

E.R. Artificer James A. Miller was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. James Miller, 
7 Sutherland Terrace, Hillhead, and later of Millbrae Crescent, Langside. He was 

168 



Biographies 



an exceptionally bright and intelligent boy, with a strong bent for Mathematics and 
hand work. On leaving School he became indentured as an apprentice engineer to 
Messrs. J. & W. Weir, Cathcart. While there he, along with several others, joined, 
at the special request of his employers, the R.N.R. Part of his training included 
two periods of about three months each in the engine room of one of H.M. warships. 
By special arrangement the time so spent counted towards his prescribed apprentice- 
ship period. A year before the outbreak of hostilities he received an appointment 
with the Burmah Oil Company, by whom he was regarded as one of the most 
promising of their junior technical staff. When war was declared he had no doubts 
as to where his duty lay, and he came home at once in a captured German vessel, 
which, however, had a narrow escape from being seized by the " Emden." Report- 
ing at once to R.N.R. headquarters, he was posted to the engine-room staff of the 
" Bayano," then fitting out on the Clyde. He sailed from Glasgow on the evening 
of 10th March, 1915, and the next morning there appeared in the papers the 
intimation that she had been torpedoed in the night time when off Ailsa Craig. 
Artificer Miller, with many more gallant youths from this city, was drowned. It 
was a tragic ending to so gallant an adventure, but his old School will specially 
treasure the memory of sons who like James A. Miller came so far and so speedily 
to the help of the Motherland. 



J. M. MOIR, M.A. 

2nd Lieutenant, 1st Batt. Black Watch 

A son of the late Rev. John Moir, B.D., Cairneyhill, Fife, Lieutenant Moir was 
twenty-six years of age when he fell leading his men in an attack on the German 
positions on the fatal 25th September, 1915. After leaving School he entered 
Glasgow University, where he graduated in Arts in 1908. In the same year he 
entered the service of the Scottish Amicable Life Assurance Society, and in 1912 
gained the degree of F.F.A. He had rapid promotion, and in 1914 he was appointed 
inspector of the Manchester Branch of the Society. On the outbreak of the war he 
enlisted as a private in the Glasgow Highlanders, and went out with the battalion 
to France at the beginning of November, 1914. He served there till June, 1915, 
when he was given a commission in the 1st Black Watch. Lieutenant Moir was 
clearly marked out for a high place in his profession, and he was greatly beloved 
by all who knew him. 

JACK MOLLISON 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force 

Lieutenant Jack Mollison was the younger son of Mr. and Mrs. John Mollison, 
6 Kelvin Drive, Kelvinside. The report that he was posted " missing," that word 
of ill omen in this war, caused profound sorrow in the School, for Jack was known 
and beloved by every one. He was of a most attractive and lovable nature, good 
humour and good feeling radiating from him. Straightforward, honourable, high- 
minded, he possessed the entire confidence of comrades and benchers. The O.T.C. 
had in him one of its most enthusiastic and efficient members. During his last year 
at School he was a sergeant and chief kettle-drummer in the band. In 1913 he 
gained the efficiency cup and two medals, one being for the best shot in the corps. 
Rugby and swimming also claimed his interest, and in both he was a notable per- 
former, gaining many prizes for the latter at the Western swimming galas. On 

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Hillhead High School 



leaving School he entered Skerry's College, intending to sit the examination for 
Sandhurst, but his eager, loyal spirit chafed at the inactivity of the student, and he 
enlisted in the 6th H.L.I, before he was seventeen years of age. After eighteen 
months in the ranks he was sent as a Cadet to Pirbright, Surrey. At the close of 
his period of training he asked to be transferred to the Royal Air Force, and in 
March, 1918, he gained his pilot's certificate. After a short leave at home he left 
for France in April. There he was just in time to take part in the most strenuous 
work the Royal Air Force ever had. The task of staying the advancing Germans and 
gaining time to fill up the ranks of the infantry, thinned and in some cases shattered 
by incessant fighting against heavy odds, fell largely on the cavalry of the air. Night 
and day they bombed the serried ranks of the Germans, inflicting frightful casualties, 
and finally holding up their advance. Jack, writing home, tells how he was often 
up and over the enemy lines three times in one day. A quiet period followed, and 
then, with the beginning of the final British advance, the Air Force were again called 
upon for the most strenuous service. In this Lieutenant Mollison played a gallant 
part, but on the 27th August he failed to return from a bombing expedition, and was 
posted missing. A long period of suspense followed, but finally a grave was found 
in Cherisy cemetery, near Arras, with his name and number upon it. One of the 
pathetic features in his case is that at the time he went missing his leave was over- 
due, and the very telegram that announced his fate was opened joyfully in the belief 
that it contained intimation of his early arrival. Sunt lachrymce rerum et mentem 
mortalia tangunt. The whole-hearted sympathy of the School goes out to his 
parents and sister, who are thus for the second time bereaved. 



WILLIAM ALLAN MOLLISON 

Lieutenant, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) 
attached Machine Gun Corps 

Lieutenant William Allan Mollison was the elder son of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Mollison, 6 Kelvin Drive, Glasgow, and was born in 1896. He was educated at 
Hillhead High School, the Royal Technical College, and the School of Art. While 
at School he was an active member of the O.T.C., but a severe illness contracted at 
one of the annual inspections terminated his connection and interrupted his School 
work for a time. On leaving School he entered the office of Mr. Goff Gillespie, 
architect, as an apprentice. In 1914 he was one of the first to answer his country's 
call, and enlisted in the Glasgow Highlanders. In June, 1915, he was transferred 
to a Cadet battalion, and after a period of training was posted to the Duke of 
Wellington's (West Riding Regiment). In September of the same year he volunteered 
for France, and was for several months in the trenches near Ypres. The hardships 
of that winter will never be forgotten by those who came through it. The whole 
line was constantly under water, and officers and men had to fight, work, and sleep 
under almost inconceivable conditions. There Allan Mollison contracted rheumatic 
fever, and was invalided home. After a term of light duty in this country he 
returned to France in May of^ 1916. He took part in the terrific fighting that marked 
the early stages of the Battle of the Somme. During these trying days his good 
work attracted the notice of his commanding officer, and he was promoted adjutant. 
Winter conditions caused a recurrence of his old trouble, and he was again invalided 
home. On his recovery he was advised to transfer to the Machine Gun Corps in 
order to keep out of the trenches. In this new branch he proved himself so efficient 
that he was retained for four months as an instructor. In January, 1918, he went 

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Biographies 



to Palestine, but in March returned to France with the 52nd Division. There he 
experienced some of the hardest fighting of the war, and was continuously in action 
for weeks on end. He was intensely proud of the example set by his men. Writing 
home he says, " My men are simply splendid. I am so proud of them; they did 
such fine work when we went over the top." On the 13th September, when just 
about to come out of action, he was severely wounded in several places by a shell. 
There seemed good hopes of his recovery, but septic poisoning set in, and he passed 
away in the hospital at Wimereux on the 1st October. According to the testimony 
of all his comrades, he was a most gallant soldier, greatly beloved by his men, and 
possessing the full confidence of his seniors. His colonel writes, " His men thought 
a tremendous lot of him. In action he was always in the best of spirits, and led his 
men with great dash, and seemed so proud of them. I always considered him one of 
my best officers, and after his behaviour in the recent successful operations placed 
him as my best section officer. I have brought him to the notice of my seniors, and 
hope his gallant conduct will be rewarded." The School will ever cherish the 
memory of this devoted, unselfish, heroic spirit. 



J. LOVE MONTGOMERIE 

Lieutenant, Singapore Volunteer Rifles 

Mr. J. Love Montgomerie was a son of Mr. David Montgomerie, Manston, 
Uddingston. While still a young man he went out to Singapore, where he held 
several important appointments. The rubber boom gave him his opportunity, and 
he was an active director of several rubber companies. Though thirty-eight years 
of age, and with large business interests, he joined the Volunteer Force that was 
formed at the time of the " Emden " raids. While assisting in quelling the riots 
in Singapore in February, 1915, Mr. Montgomerie was shot by one of the mutineers, 
and a career of great promise was brought to a close. 



WILLIAM MANSON MONTGOMERIE 

Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery 

William Manson Montgomerie, second son of the late Mr. and Mrs. David 
Montgomerie, Manston, Uddingston, was one of a large family, all of whom were 
connected with the School from the beginning, and all of whom also have remained 
deeply attached to it, some of them across estranging seas. William Montgomerie 
was a good cricketer, and played for Uddingston and Kenmure. In civil life he was 
cashier in the firm of Thomas Scanlan & Co. Early in 1917, though then nearing 
the age limit, he joined the Royal Garrison Artillery, and by September he was 
serving the guns in France. Towards the end of August, 1918, while pushing 
forward in pursuit of the enemy, he was struck by a shell and severely wounded. 
The doctors thought he would recover, but the shock proved too much for him, and 
he passed away on the 1st September, 1918. An older brother, Mr. J. Love 
Montgomerie, of the Singapore Mounted Volunteers, gave his life in an attempt to 
quell the riots that broke out in Singapore in the early days of the war. Gunner 
Montgomerie leaves a wife and two children, to whom the School respectfully offers 
its sincerest smypathy. 

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Hillhead High School 



WILLIAM MORLAND 

2nd Lieutenant, HX.I. 

Second Lieutenant William Morland was the eldest son of the late Mr. William 
Morland, and of Mrs. Morland, 10 Carlton Terrace, North Kelvinside. At School 
he was a pupil to rejoice a teacher's heart, steady, reliable, upright, always giving 
of his best. Fond of books and devoted to his home, he took but a small part in the 
outdoor life of the School. Yet he was held in the highest esteem by his school- 
fellows, who are ever quick to appreciate those fine qualities of head and heart that 
William Morland had in abundance. On leaving School he entered as an apprentice 
the office of Messrs. J. W. Stewart & Co., chartered accountants, of which Lord 
Provost Stewart is the senior partner. There he found the work thoroughly to his 
taste, and he applied himself in his usual thorough, methodical way to mastering 
his profession. The present Lord Provost, writing after he learned of his death in 
action, says, " I can assure you that every one here feels his death as almost a 
personal bereavement, as since he joined the staff our association with him has left 
nothing but the pleasantest recollections." Early in 1915 he enlisted as a private 
in the Glasgow Highlanders. In August, 1916, he proceeded to France, and shared 
in the strenuous fighting of the autumn campaign, but came through unscathed. In 
December, 1916, he was recommended for a commission, and came home for training. 
On finishing his course he was posted to the 17th H.L.I. , but on returning to France 
he was attached to the Trench Mortar Battery of the 97th Brigade. During an 
attack on the German lines, on the morning of the 2nd December, 1917, he was 
struck by a piece of shrapnel, and died almost immediately. His commanding officer 
writes, " During the short time he was with the battery he made himself universally 
popular both with officers and men." The heartfelt sympathy of the School is 
extended to his widowed mother and brothers. 



JOHN HENRY GEORGE MORRISON 

Engineer Artificer, R.NV.R. 

John Henry George Morrison (better known as Jackie) was the elder son of Mr. 
George Morrison, Chili, and of Mrs. Morrison, 571 Sauchiehall Street. At School 
he was greatly beloved by his comrades and teachers, who recognised the kindly, 
generous nature that lay beneath his reserved manner. From the first he displayed 
that rare combination of gifts, a reflective mind and a strongly practical bent, a 
ocmbination from which inventors and discoverers are made. On leaving School he 
entered the employment of A. & J. Inglis, shipbuilders, as an apprentice engineer. 
At the same time he enrolled as a student in the Royal Technical College. For 
several years he was an active member of the Students' Section of the Institute of 
Engineers and Shipbuilders, serving on the Council for a period of twelve months, 
and subsequently acting as its honorary secretary. Early in 1913, at a meeting of 
the Students' Section, he read a paper on " Corrosion of Condenser Tubes." This 
contribution was selected by the Institute for publication, and appears in volume 56 
of its proceedings. During session 1914-15 he taught the third year class in 
Engineering Drawing in Shawlands Academy Continuation School, and by the 
testimony of the headmaster " he threw himself into his work with enthusiasm, and 
his efforts were much appreciated by the students." This record bespeaks a 
strenuous life, yet amid it all he found time to pursue in the summer months his 
favourite pastime of sailing. He and his brother were experts in patching up old 

172 



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boats and sailing them all over the Firth at a minimum of cost. In April, 1915, he 
joined the transport " Marmion " as engineer, transferring in June to the R.N.V.R. 
as engineer artificer. For two and a half years he served in the East on board the 
destroyer " Mosquito." Returning home in the winter of 1917, he was posted to 
the " Racoon," a sister ship to the " Mosquito." On the night of 9th December, 
1917, during a blinding snowstorm, she foundered off the Irish coast with all on 
board. He was twenty-four years of age, and in that short time had given evidence 
both of solid achievement and brilliant promise. 



J. IAIN MORRISON 

Lieutenant, The Royal Scots Fusiliers 

The only son of Mr. and Mrs. James Morrison, 22 Derby Crescent, Glasgow, 
Lieutenant J. Iain Morrison was a well-known figure in Rugby circles, and for years 
one of the mainstays of the Hillhead team. Powerfully built, of great speed, and 
absolutely fearless, it was no easy matter to stop him once he got set agoing. 
When war broke out he was engaged with Messrs. Bayne & Duckett, and, as might 
be expected of his ardent and generous nature, he was one of the first to join as 
a private in the Scottish Horse. In February, 1915, he received a commission 
in The Royal Scots Fusiliers, and went to France towards the end of that year. 
In March, 1916, he was promoted lieutenant, and soon afterwards was attached to 
the Trench Mortar Battery. On 16th September, 1916, just when he was about 
to leave the trenches, he was seriously wounded by fragments of a shell, and was 
conveyed to the 24th General Hospital, where he died on the 28th September. 
Though Lieutenant Morrison spent most of his School life at Glasgow High School, 
he began his education at Hillhead High School, and resumed his connection 
with it as a regular member of the Former Pupils' Rugby team. In him the country 
has lost a dashing and resolute officer, and the School Club a loyal and devoted 
member. He was twenty-three years of age. 



J. STEWART MORRISON 

2nd Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 

The intimation of the death of Second Lieutenant J. Stewart Morrison from 
wounds received in action caused profound sorrow throughout the School. For years 
he was one of the most prominent figures in School life, and the presiding musical 
genius at all the School concerts. His charm of manner and native courtesy of 
disposition won all hearts, and gave him a unique place in the counsels of his fellows. 
He had a fine literary taste and a sure literary judgment, and his whole character 
and conduct reflected the noble company of authors who were his never-failing 
friends. Second Lieutenant Morrison, who was only twenty years of age, was the 
elder son of the late Mr. Kenneth Morrison and Mrs. Morrison, 25 Hayburn Crescent, 
Tartick. To her the sympathies of the School go out in fullest measure. 

In 1915 he left School to join the University in preparation for the ministry of 
the United Free Church. But his eager spirit, born of a long line of Highland 
ancestry, chafed at inaction at home when great deeds were afoot on the fields of 
France, and after repeated attempts he obtained a commission in January, 1916. 
He proceeded to France in August, and was justly proud of being attached to the 

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2nd Cameron ians, a regular battalion with a great record. Second Lieutenant 
Morrison's friends feared that the hardships and exposures of trench life would prove 
too much for his somewhat frail frame, and great was their surprise and delight 
to find when he returned from the Front that he had become a perfect Achilles, 
with not a single flaw in his physical armour. He came safely through the first 
stages of the Battle of Arras, but on the 6th May, 1917, he was dangerously wounded 
by a piece of shrapnel, and died eight days later in a hospital in France. His was 
a singularly attractive, unselfish, and beautiful nature, and its noble harmony will 
long vibrate in memory. May we not leave as his epitaph those words of his own 
beloved Stevenson in " Aes Trijrtex," " The trumpets are hardly done blowing 
when trailing with him clouds of glory this richly gifted spirit shoots into the 
spiritual land." 

ROBERT WIGGANS MORRISON 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Battalion H.L.I. 

Private Robert Wiggans Morrison was the son of Captain and Mrs. Morrison, 
46 St. James Street, Hillhead. He was one of a family of six brothers who, as well 
as their father, served throughout the war, all of them coming back safe except 
Robert. He was interested in all forms of sport, and was a member of the School 
Rugby team. On leaving School he entered the service of Messrs. Babcock & 
Wilcox as an apprentice engineer. As a member of the Glasgow Highlanders he was 
mobilised on the 4th August, 1914, ana proceeded with the battalion to France on 
2nd November of the same year. With them he came safely through the heavy 
fighting on the Western front till the autumn of 1917. He was then transferred to 
the Royal Engineers, and served with them till he was demobilised in March, 1919. 
He was only home three weeks when he took a severe cold, which developed into 
meningitis. As he was still nominally in service, he was sent to the hospital at 
Stobhill, where he died on the 13th April, 1919. It is tragic to think of him 
passing unscathed through the many perils and hardships of camp and field only to 
be struck down amid the comforts of home. 



J, T. KINGSTON MORTON 

Private, 17th Batt. H.L.I. 

Private Kingston Morton, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. John Morton, 5 Kelvin- 
grove Terrace, Glasgow, was a much esteemed pupil at School. Though not tall, 
he was very athletic, and was always well to the front in the cricket, swimming, and 
cycling sections. He was also well known and is still remembered at School for his 
collection of stamps, which was as extensive as it was rare. On leaving School, 
in the summer of 1911, he joined his father's business, and was just beginning to 
relieve him of much of its burden when war broke out. Private Morton had no 
natural bent towards soldiering, as some natures have, but he had a high sense of 
duty, and when the call came he made instant response. He joined the 17th 
(Chamber of Commerce) Battalion H.L.I, on 13th September, 1914, along with 
some forty other " Old Hillheaders." He went to France in November, 1915, and 
fell during the first rush on the German trenches on 1st July, 1916. Private 
Morton, who was twenty-four years of age, was quiet and reserved, but always 
cheery and highly popular with his comrades. 

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FREDERICK MOTTRAM 

Captain, Royal Field Artillery 
Frederick (better known as Eric) Mottram was the third son of Mr. Thomas 
H. Mottram, Divisional Inspector of Mines, and of Mrs. Mottram, Imperial Crescent, 
Doncaster. For a number of years his father was stationed in Glasgow, and Eric 
attended Hillhead High School till the close of his Intermediate course. He took an 
active part in the games of the School, and was a prominent member of the 1st XV. 
Few pupils have left a more fragrant memory in the School than Eric Mottram. He 
was a boy of rare promise, while his strong but refined character, sunny disposition, 
and generous nature won for him the goodwill and regard of all who came in contact 
with him. On his father's removal to England he enrolled in Liverpool Institute. 
There he was a prominent figure in the cricket, football, and athletic field, and tied 
for first place in the high jump (open) at the Liverpool sports. On leaving 
Liverpool he went to Yorkshire Main Colliery, Doncaster, as a student of mining, 
and prior to the war was appointed assistant manager there, though only twenty 
years of age. Immediately war broke out he applied for a commission, and was 
gazetted to the R.F.A. He went to France in March, 1915, and during two and a 
half years took part in some of the hardest fighting on the Western Front. He was 
promoted captain and adjutant of a Divisional Ammunition Column, and it was 
while engaged on these duties that he was fatally injured by a bomb, 9th September, 
1917. His colonel, writing of him, says — " It is with great grief that I have to write 
and sympathise with you in your sad loss, and to tell you in what high estimation 
your son Eric was held by all who knew him and had to work with him. What he 
had to do was always done with that willingness and keenness that made him the 
excellent adjutant he was." Another senior officer wrote regarding him — " I know 
that every officer and man in the Brigade will share your grief. Eric went out to 
France as one of my subalterns, and I at once liked him, and eventually formed a 
very high opinion of him. He was a good soldier, conscientious and trustworthy 
in the extreme, always ready to take any risks, and invaluable to me in every way." 
These tributes — and many more might be quoted — picture Eric to the life both 
as boy and man. Wherever he went he left behind a legacy of happy and precious 
memories. 

JOHN MURRAY, B.Sc. 

EngineeivLieutenant, Royal Navy 

The report that Engineer-Lieutenant John Murray had been lost at sea on 7th 
March, 1916, caused very real sorrow among a wide circle of friends. He was a 
man of strong and attractive personality, and had before him a career of very bright 
promise when he was cut down thus early. On leaving School he entered Glasgow 
University, where after a distinguished record he graduated Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering. His engineering apprenticeship was served with Messrs. David Rowan 
& Co. On its completion he received an appointment in Denny's shipbuilding yard, 
Dumbarton. Here, as elsewhere, his real merit soon made itself felt, and he was 
being entrusted by the firm with increasingly responsible work. On the outbreak 
of war he offered his services to the Admiralty, and in February, 1915, he was 
appointed to H.M.S. " Shannon," Second Cruiser Squadron, and was latterly 
attached to a torpedo flotilla. He died as he would have wished to die, at the post of 
duty. He was in all respects a very gallant gentleman. 
"The deep, lone sea hath one." 

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RONALD GORDON MURRAY 

Private, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. The Highland Light Infantry 

Ronald Gordon Murray, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Murray, 21 Penrith 
Avenue, Giffnock, is the second of his family to lay down his life in the sacred cause. 
His brother, the eldest son, was killed in Gallipoli in June, 1915. Ronald attended 
Hillhead High School from 1903 till 1910, and his teachers have still a vivid recol- 
lection of the high promise of his schooldays. He was of a bright and sanguine 
disposition, full of happiness himself, and spreading happiness all round. 
He was fond of all outdoor sports, being a strong swimmer and 
good cricketer. He inherited his father's love of music, and was an 
accomplished pianist. On leaving School he was apprenticed to Messrs. 
H. & D. Barclay, architects, Glasgow. He was too young for service in 1914, but 
as soon as he was of age he joined the Glasgow Highlanders as a private in October, 
1915, and six months later was in the trenches in France. On the morning of 
15th July, 1916, his battalion took part in the great advance of that day, and early 
in the attack he was seen to fall fatally wounded by shrapnel. The heartfelt 
sympathy of the School goes out to the bereaved parents, who have been thus for 
the second time stricken. 



WILLIAM H. MURRAY, M.I.M.E. 

Sapper, Royal Engineers; Expert in Demolitions to the Admiralty 

Mr. William H. Murray, a son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Murray, 21 Penrith Avenue, 
Giffnock, was one of His Majesty's Inspectors of Mines when war broke out. Though 
he was in a starred occupation, he was one of the first to join the 1st Field Company 
Divisional Engineers, a corps formed by the Admiralty for special work at the 
Dardanelles. In this corps every man was an expert engineer and a member of the 
Institute of Civil, Mining, or Electrical Engineers. He was shot down on 9th 
June, 1915, by a sniper while he was directing a section of sappers and infantry in 
the erection of some redoubts in advance of the firing line. Few men have made 
greater sacrifices than Mr. Murray. He was a recognised authority in his profession, 
he had brilliant prospects, he was married and had two young children, and he could 
claim exemption on several good grounds, but he felt strongly that it was his duty 
to set an example, and so he lies on the wind-swept heaths of Gallipoli. 

JACK NANCE 

Lance'Corporal, Lochiel's Camerons 

Private Jack Nance, the only son of Mr. J. H. Nance, dental surgeon, was born 
in 1892. While he was at School he was a bright, earnest pupil, and highly popular 
both with his classmates and teachers. On leaving School he entered his father's 
business. He served for a time in the Territorial Force, and when war broke out 
he was one of the many old Hillhead High School boys to join Lochiel's Camerons. 
He went to France in July, 1915, and saw a lot of heavy fighting. He was severely 
wounded at the Battle of Loos, but made a good recovery, and rejoined his regiment 
in December of the same year. Like so many more gallant fellows, he fell in the 
fierce onslaught of 17th August, 1916. Through all the hardships and privations 
of trench warfare he kept cheery, resolute, and steadfast, and " played the game " 
to the last. 

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Biographies 



WILFRED CYRIL DE NANCE 
Lance 'Corporal, Scottish Rifles 

Lance-Corporal Wilfred C. de Nance was the younger son of the late William 
C. de Nance, dentist, 281 St. George's Road, Glasgow, and the only son of Mrs. de 
Nance, 28 Holyrood Quadrant. He received all his education at Hillhead High 
School, where he is still remembered for his bright and cheerful disposition and 
frank, open nature. On leaving School he entered the office of Messrs. Napier & 
M'Intyre, iron merchants, Oswald Street. There he made rapid progress, and was 
held in high esteem by his principals and the other members of the staff. At the 
outbreak of war he was a member of the Hillhead Company of the Glasgow 
Highlanders, and was mobilised on the 4th August, 1914. He proceeded with his 
battalion to France in November, and was one of the gallant band who held the Yser 
Front against the overwhelming forces of the enemy. The war has brought many 
surprises, but when the full story of it comes to be written probably the greatest 
will be the failure of the Germans in the early days of the war to break through the 
thin red line of British troops. Then, too, will be known the full story of the 
amazing bravery and almost incredible hardships of the original British Army. 
Corporal de Nance came safely through it all, but was wounded in the head at the 
Battle of Festubert in April, 1915. After a long spell in hospital and at home he 
returned to France in April, 1916. He came safely through much hard fighting 
during the Battle of the Somme, but fell in action on 20th May, 1917. The sergeant 
of his platoon writing home says, " Your son was by my side during some heavy 
fighting, and I found him to be a dependable companion. Later in the day, when 
the German position was captured, he was shot through the heart by a sniper, and 
died immediately. All of Platoon No. 6 feel his loss very much, I especially, as he 
was one of my best and most reliable N.C.O.'s." The pupils and staff tender their 
sincerest sympathy to his mother in the loss of a dearly beloved and only son. 



ROBERT HILLIER NAPIER, B.D. 

Lieutenant, 4/ 1st Batt. King's African Rifles 

Robert Hillier Napier was born at Yoker in 1884. He entered Hillhead High 
School in 1898, going two years later to Morrison's Academy, Crieff, where he 
became Dux of the School in 1901. He always spoke with great affection of his life 
at Hillhead High School when his chief friend was Alexander Grant, afterwards a 
missionary in India, thus indicating in these early days the purity of his heart and 
mind, like drawing to like. At the University 'he fulfilled all the promise of his 
School days and proved himself to be a brilliant and distinguished student. Having 
graduated with 2nd Class Honours in classics in 1905 he entered the Divinity Hall 
of the Church of Scotland, gaining there many prizes and other distinctions. At the 
close of his Divinity course he gained the B.D. degree, and the Black Fellowship as 
the first student of his year. 

During his college career his energies were spread over a wide field ; he was an 
enthusiastic volunteer and played a prominent part in the Union debates; he was 
President of the Christian Union, and his popularity with his fellows was evidenced 
by his election as President of the S.R.C. At the close of a short period of service 
with Dr. Menzies Fergusson, Logie, he was ordained in 1909 as a missionary of the 
Church of Scotland, and sailed for Nyassaland. In the mission field he found his 
true vocation, his fine gifts of scholarship, noble qualities of heart and unremitting 

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energy being used without stint in the service of his Master. His industry was un- 
wearying and he had the gift of inspiring enthusiasm and cheerful service in those 
with whom he worked. In addition to his regular work as missionary in Blantyre 
and Zomba, he shared in the translation of the Bible into the native language, and 
had the privilege of training the first native missionaries. 

On the outbreak of war he took part in the defence of Nyassaland, doing 
valuable service in charge of the native transport lines; later he served with the 
native transport in German East Africa. His great linguistic attainments enabled 
him to take the post of intelligence officer to the British Force, and it was while 
attached as lieutenant to the 4/ 1st King's African Rifles that he fell in Portuguese 
Africa on the 11th February, 1918. Fearless and zealous in the cause of others 
he had gone forward to reconnoitre the enemy's lines, when he fell mortally 
wounded. 

Robert Napier was a man of winning personality, of lofty ideals, and sterling 
character — unselfish, of deep religious feeling, prodigal of service. He delighted 
in the bright side of social intercourse and loved all outdoor games and sports, 
especially Rugby, swimming, and mountaineering. Rectorial elections of the 
old days appealed strongly to him, and he was equally at home leading an 
attack through a mist of pease meal, presiding at the councils of his party, or 
writing clever electioneering pamphlets. 

Robert Napier's loss can never be rightly estimated; his sun has gone down 
ere yet it was noonday ; his memory lives and inspires. Here indeed was 

"One who never turned his back, but marched breast forward, 
Held we fall to rise, are baffled to fight better, sleep to wake. " 



JOHN T. NEILSON 

2nd Lieutenant, Scottish Rifles 

Lieutenant John T. Neilson was the only son of the late Mr. William 
Neilson and of Mrs. Neilson, Holyrood Quadrant, Glasgow. He received all 
his education in Hillhead High School. At School he distinguished himself by 
taking several prizes, and gained one of the School scholarships. At the close 
of his School career he entered the office of Messrs. Aitken, Mackenzie & 
Clapperton, stockbrokers, and continued in their service till he joined the 
University O.T.C. in the summer of 1915. In November of the same year he 
received his commission in the 8th Scottish Rifles. After a period of training 
at Ripon he left for Egypt in March, 1916. He came safely through the battles 
of Romani and Gaza, but in the subsequent heavy fighting in Palestine, he fell 
mortally wounded while leading his platoon in a successful attack on the Gaza 
defences, 2nd November, 1917. The chaplain, writing to Lieutenant Neilson's 
mother, says, " Your son was a great personal friend of my own, and I went 
often to see him both when he was in camp and when he was moving up and 
down in the armoured train. I shall miss him most tremendously, and so shall 
we all, as he was most popular with all ranks." Lieutenant Neilson was well 
known in musical circles as an amateur performer of much promise. He was an 
enthusiastic member of the Lyric Club, and was held in the greatest esteem by 
his fellow-members. He was a singularly loving and devoted son and brother, 
and the School desires to express the deepest sympathy with his widowed mother 
and sisters. 

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GEORGE NELSON 

Lance-Corporal, The Kings Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry) 

Lance-Corporal Nelson was the son of Mr. George Nelson, 10 Strathallan 
Terrace, Dowanhill. A quiet, reserved, thoughtful boy, he seemed to have no 
interests and no companions save his books. On leaving School he entered 
Glasgow University as a medical student. Though he might easily have pleaded, 
as did so many others, his medical studies as a reason for refraining from enlisting, 
he joined the K.O.S.B. as a private in May, 1915. 7th September of the same 
year saw him in France, and two months later he was wounded by a sniper's 
bullet. He was for a time in a hospital at home, but returned to France in 
June, 1916. In consequence of the depletion of units during the Battle of the 
Somme there was in many instances a regrouping of personnel, and Lance- 
Corporal Nelson was transferred to the King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). 
While serving with this regiment he received wounds in action, from which he 
died on the 24th January, 1917, aged twenty-three years. In his case also it 
was only a compelling sense of duty that brought him to the battlefield, for its 
sights and sounds were altogether hateful to his gentle nature. 



JAMES NICOLSON 

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force 

Lieutenant James Nicolson was the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Nicolson, 
22 Viewmount Drive, Maryhill. He was a typical boy at School, keen on play, 
and not overfond of books, but very apt in those subjects in which his interest 
was aroused. He was an active member of the Boy Scouts, and was, like his 
friend Donald Sinclair, a patrol leader in the 82nd (Maryhill) Troop. While 
keen on games, especially football, craftsmanship of all kinds strongly appealed 
to him, and he devoted much time to woodcarving and photography. On leaving 
School he entered the same business as his father, first in the office and later in 
the workshop. On the outbreak of war he was one of the first to enlist, and the 
10th of August, 1914, saw him in the ranks of the Scottish Rifles. In November 
of the same year he went with his regiment to France, where he served till 
December, 1916, when he was invalided home with dysentery. In August, 
1917, he became a Cadet in the Royal Flying Corps, and, after passing through 
a theoretical course of training, he received his commission, and was sent to 
Egypt. There he received his practical training, and soon obtained his pilot's 
certificate. In May, 1918, after a short visit to this country, he proceeded to 
France, where he joined the 20th Squadron, R.A.F. On the 23rd September, 
while on a reconnoitring patrol with five other machines over the German lines, 
they were attacked by an overwhelming squadron of German planes, and had 
to retreat. He and his observer noticed that one of their machines in charge 
of a new pilot was in difficulty, and they turned back to assist. This they did 
effectively, for the hard-pressed plane reached our lines in safety. Lieutenant 
Nicolson and his observer were not so fortunate. Their machine was struck by 
a shell, and crashed from 14,000 feet. Their after fate is unknown, but doubt- 
less they were both killed, thus, in a very literal sense, laying down their lives 
for their friends. It is a noble record, and one of which his old School is 
justly proud. 

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STUART NIMMO 

Captain, The Royal Scots Fusiliers 

Captain Stuart Nimmo, elder son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Nimmo, The 
Crescent, W. Croydon, was born at Dunoon in 1897. He was educated at 
Ardrossan Academy and Hillhead High School. At the latter he stayed seven 
years, and few pupils entered more whole-heartedly into the life of the School 
or remained more constant in his affection for it. He was by no means 
a student, as all his interests lay in the direction of games and action generally. 
He was noted for his cheerfulness and pluck, and his bright and happy nature 
will always be gratefully remembered by his schoolfellows. He was intensely 
fond of music, and the band of the Cadet Corps owed much to his enthusiasm 
and skill. On leaving School he entered the office of Messrs. Arbuckle, Smith 
& Co., shippers. The martial spirit was strong in Stuart, and when war began 
he tried to enlist, but a kindly old colonel turned him down with the words, 
" You look more like a schoolboy than a soldier." But on coming of age he 
applied again, and this time was granted a commission in the 9th R.S.F. In 
September, 1916, he left for Salonica. There he experienced to the full all 
the depressing conditions of that malaria-infected region. But nothing would 
damp his high spirits. He was a singularly devoted son and brother, and his 
letters home were simply bubbling over with humour and cheeriness. Just 
before the big advance on Bulgaria he wrote, " If you don't hear from me for 
a time don't fret. I am absolutely full of life — and work." He was eagerly 
looking forward to leave, which was long overdue, but a series of untoward 
circumstances kept it back. Then came the final act in the Balkan drama, and 
not an officer could be spared. Stuart, moreover, was adjutant to his battalion, 
and simply could not get away. In the attack on the enemy's strong position 
west of Lake Doiran the battalion speedily reached its objective, but there came 
under heavy fire, and Stuart was killed instantaneously, 19th September, 1918. 
One of his fellow-officers writes, " I cannot express to you my sorrow and the 
sorrow of the whole battalion at the loss of such a good, gentle, yet most efficient 
officer." Another says, " He was deservedly one of the most popular of officers 
both with his fellow-officers and with the men. During the two months before 
iiis death, when he held the position of adjutant, he showed that, in addition 
tp his qualities of being one of the best of good fellows and as straight as a 
die, he had ability, common sense, and tact in a surprising degree in one so 
young." 

ROBERT OSBOURNE 

Captain, 9th (Glasgow Highland) Batt. H.L.I. 

Captain Robert Osbourne, who was twenty-nine years of age, was the elder 
son of Mr. Robert Osbourne, 1 Colebrooke Place. He was educated at the 
Hermitage School, Helensburgh, and Hillhead High School. At School his 
attractive disposition and frank nature secured for him many friends both 
among his schoolfellows and the teaching staff. On leaving School he entered 
the office of the United Turkey Red Company, Limited, and subsequently for 
five years occupied a position in a business house in Rangoon. During his 
residence there he was a member of the Rangoon Mounted Rifles, holding the 
rank of sergeant. Besides being an enthusiastic Volunteer he was a keen 
oarsman, and was stroke in the team which won the challenge cup at the Rangoon 
Boating Regatta in 1912, for which he was presented by his regiment with a 

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Biographies 



silver cup as a mark of their appreciation. He returned to Glasgow in' 1913, 
and, on the outbreak of war, rejoined as a private in the Glasgow Highlanders. 
In April, 1915, he was granted a commission in his own regiment — a rare and 
coveted distinction. His promotion thereafter was rapid, and in February, 
1917, he was gazetted captain. His native courtesy of disposition, his con- 
sideration for others, and his high-souled integrity endeared him to every 
member of the regiment. One of his fellow-officers testifies that " he was a 
father to his whole platoon, who used to be so proud of him not only as their 
leader but as their helper and friend." On the 2nd March, 1917, in an attack 
near Clery, in the Somme valley, he was struck by a bullet and died within 
an hour. His commanding officer writes — " He had not been long with me, 
but long enough to show that he was made of the proper stuff. I miss him 
very much as one of my most promising young officers. He was liked by his 
men, and for a soldier there is no higher praise." 



JAMES ROBERT PARKER 

Sergeant, 17th H.L.L 

Sergeant J. R. Parker was known at School as a youth of much promise 
both in character and ability. He was equally at home with lessons and with 
games, and whatever he had to do, he did with all his might. On leaving 
School he gained entrance to the Civil Service, and finally was appointed 
assistant to the Surveyor of Taxes. He kept up his interest in his old School 
and was an active member of the Tennis Club, and an outstanding figure in 
the Rugby team. In two seasons he played for the first XV. in the three-quarter 
line. Slight and almost fragile looking he was yet ever prominent in attack. 
His resolution, dash, and elusiveness rendered him a formidable opponent, and 
every one felt there were great possibilities when Bobby got the ball. Like so 
many more of our old boys he joined the Chamber of Commerce Battalion as 
a private on the outbreak of war and went to France in November, 1915, as 
sergeant of its machine gun section. His sterling qualities found ample scope 
for their exercise during the trying winter of 1915, and secured for him the 
confidence and regard of both officers and men. He took a prominent part in 
the famous bombing raid which brought so much eclat to the 17th. For his 
part in the business he was allowed home on leave. On returning to the Front 
he was one of the band of brothers who met in an Inn in Picardy to com- 
memorate their School days and to honour their School. Of the gay company 
that there assembled only some three' or four have won safely through. The 
great majority, including the gallant J. R. Parker, sleep their last sleep before 
the impregnable lines of Thiepval, which they heriocally, but vainly, sought 
to gain on the 1st July, 1916. One of his friends, writing home, says—" I fast 
saw Bob on the night preceding the great assault. He was in great spirits, 
and I never came in contact with any one who was more fed up with comparative 
inaction or looked forward more eagerly to the Big Push." 

SHAW STEWART PICKEN 

Private, Machine Gun Corps 

Private Shaw Stewart Picken was the son of Mr. S. S. Picken, 44 Kelvingrove 
Street, Glasgow. He was a bright, cheery youth, and a great favourite with his 

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comrades. His Stewart tartan kilt was always a conspicuous feature in the play- 
ground and the School lines. He only left School in 1914, and one can hardly 
realise that since then he has played a man's part and fallen gloriously on the field 
of fame. On leaving School he entered his father's business, but as soon as he was 
eighteen he at once joined the colours. For the new life he was to some extent 
prepared, as he had been a keen Cadet while at School, and was also actively interested 
ia the Boy Scout movement. The hardships of trench life he bore patiently and 
uncomplainingly, and was regarded as a good comrade by all his fellows. On the 
14th April, 1918, while endeavouring with others to stem the great German onrush 
at Neuve Eglise he fell while serving his gun to the last. The School will not readily 
forget Stewart Picken, who carried into young manhood the simple truthful heart 
of his early years. 



A, A. RALSTON 

Lance'Corporal, l/6th Batt. H.L.L . 

W. J. RALSTON 

Private, l/6th Batt. H.L.I. 

These two brothers were killed on the same day, the 12th July, 1915, during 
the attack on the Turkish positions in front of Achi Baba. They were at first 
reported wounded and missing, but confirmation of their death was obtained 
later. They were prominent and popular members of the Rugby Club, which 
had a third brother, J. R. Ralston, as one of the team. The captain of their 
company paid a high tribute to their unfailing good spirits, their willing 
service, and their splendid endurance. " They always played the game." The 
heartfelt sympathy of the School goes out to their parents, who have been thus 
doubly bereaved. 

"In death they were not divided." 



JAMES RANKIN 

Corporal, l/8th A. & S. Highlanders 

Corporal James Rankin, son of Mr. James Rankin, Wakefield, Pollokshields, 
was one of a family who were connected with the School from the beginning, two 
at least of them spending twelve or thirteen years within its walls. James 
joined the School on the opening day, but after three years he went to George 
Watson's, Edinburgh. Subsequently he returned, and began business in 
Glasgow. Though his time with us was short, he always retained his interest 
in his old School, and on the occasion of his last leave home paid a visit to 
Mr. Walker. He took a keen interest in games, especially football and golf. In 
March, 1916, he joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and went overseas 
to France in August of the same year, being attached to the l/8th A. & S.H. As 
member of a famous fighting regiment he saw much hard service, but accepted 
everything with high courage and unfailing cheerfulness. During the heavy 
fighting that marked the summer of 1917 he was severely wounded, and died 
at a casualty clearing station on the 3rd of August. 

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Biographies 



STEVEN D. REITH, D.C.M., B.Sc. 

Lieutenant, Deoli Regiment 

No one is more widely mourned in ihe School than Steven Reith, whose 
death, at a time when we were filled with triumphant expectation rather than 
with anxiety, has been the heavier a grief to us all. He was one who not only 
worked vigorously in the School's interests himself, but drew their best work 
from those around him; so that there were many who knew him, and of these 
there was none who did not hold him in honour. 

To say that he played for the first XV. (School) from 1906 till 1910, and 
that he gained his first XV. (F.P.) cap in 1912; that he rose to the rank of 
colour-sergeant in the O.T.C. ; and that he was President of the Literary 
Society which he had helped to found, is to give some idea of the many-sided 
nature of his abilities; it is less easy to do justice to the eager, hardworking, 
enthusiastic personality he brought to each of these spheres, to the buoyant 
humour, the sense of adequacy, the readiness to encourage younger members, 
which made all things possible, and one's best supremely worth the doing. Tin 
also played a leading part in the life of the West of Scotland Agricultunl 
College, and of Glasgow University, where he graduated B.Sc. in 1914. 

To those of us who knew him, the brilliance of his military career was 
welcome as a manifestation of his work, but was in no way surprising. He 
applied for a commission in the first days of August, 1914, but his eagerness 
sought a speedier way, and the raising of that body of Hillhead men which 
gave the School its particular pride in the 17th H.L.I, was largely his work. 
He remained faithful to the duties he had undertaken, and held the rank of 
company sergeant-major when the battalion went overseas. For his share in 
one of the l7th's earliest exploits he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct 
Medal. He was wounded on the eve of the attack of 1st July, 1916, and after 
a period of convalescence was appointed to the 6th O.C.B., Oxford, where he 
passed out at the head of the list. He was in consequence offered a commission 
in the Indian Army, and gazetted to the Deoli Regiment, with which he served 
in the Palestine campaign, winning fresh credit for his efficiency and keenness. 
He was killed in the advance of 20th September ; since death was to come to 
him, it could have come in no nobler way. It must be some comfort to those 
who mourn for him that the war at least gave him the opportunity to develop 
his character to the fullest. No situation however dangerous, and no respon- 
sibility however great, found him wanting. Always he was true to himself, 
and the Roll of Honour contains no worthier name. 

To-day more than ever before we are proud of the School ; but there has 
been a heavy price to pay for our pride. Let us remember always that those 
men who in peace time made the School what it is, and who have raised it to 
honour in war, have at no time thought that price too great. We who remain 
must not fall below the high level of their fortitude and faith. 



ERNEST HOPE RIBBECK 

Private, 3rd Batt. H.L.I. 

Private Ernest Hope Ribbeck, who died of pneumonia at Gailes Military 
Hospital on the 2nd January, 1918, was the elder son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Ribbeck, 
162 West Princes Street, Glasgow. He received all his education in Hillhead High 

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Hiilhead High School 



School, and from the first took a creditable place in all his classes. Big and powerful, 
he was yet of a singularly gentle and courteous nature, and was a universal favourite. 
He was an ardent member of the Rugby section, and was a tireless worker in the 
pack. Cricket, too, claimed his attention, and the Photographic Club, during the 
last two years of his School life, owned much to his devotion and skill. He joined 
the Scout movement at its inception, and continued to take an active interest in 
all its doings till he joined the Army. Many of the boys still at School will remember 
the fine lead given them in the First Glasgow Troop by Assistant Scoutmaster 
Ribbeck. He was prevented by illness from at first joining the fighting forces, but 
obtained a post on the clerical staff of the Army Service Corps, and was stationed 
in Edinburgh. Later he was transferred to the 3rd Battalion H.L.I, at Gailes. 
While training there he caught a chill, which developed into pneumonia, and he 
passed away on the 2nd January, 1918. He is now enrolled among the gallant and 
devoted band who have given their life for King and country, whether on the stricken 
field or in the training camp. 



J. A. HOPE RICHMOND 

Sub-Lieutenant, Anson Batt., R.NJ). 

Hope Richmond was the only son of the late Mr. James Richmond, manager of 
the North British Tube Works, and of Mrs. Richmond, 95 Maxwell Drive. He was 
educated at Hiilhead High School and Bellahouston Academy. He was a singularly 
lovable and attractive pupil, and was considerate and thoughtful far beyond his 
years. He was fond of all kinds of games, and was an outstanding figure in the 
back division of the Academy football team. On leaving School he became an 
apprentice engineer with Messrs. Dunsmuir & Jackson, and was almost through 
with his apprenticeship when the war broke out. Like his father before him, Hope 
took an active interest in the Clyde Division, R.N.V.R., and finally rose to be an 
officer in the Govan section. He was mobilised on the 4th August, and proceeded 
for training to the Crystal Palace. In the spring of 1915 he left for the East, and 
was one of the famous Naval Division that shared the glories and, alas ! also the 
losses of the first landing on Gallipoli. Of the officers in Hope's Battalion only the 
chaplain, the doctor, and himself came through unscathed. Two days later he, too, 
fell in an attack on the Turkish trenches. His body was recovered, and now rests 
on the wind-swept heaths of Gallipoli. The chaplain wrote, " Hope was a dear 
friend to us all, and we shall miss him, those of us who are left, more than I can 
tell you." He was one of the most devoted of sons and the staunchest of brothers, 
and ever placed their interests before his own. 



WILLIAM JAMES ROBERTSON 

Trooper, Scottish Horse, attached The Black Watch 

William J. Robertson was the eldest son of James and Elizabeth Robertson, 
21 Partickhill Road, Glasgow. He received all his education at Hiilhead High 
School, where the memory of his high spirits, cheery disposition, and loyal nature 
is still fragrant. Without attaining any special distinction in School work, he 
took a creditable place in his classes, and gained the Intermediate Certificate. On 
leaving School in 1912 he entered an office for a time, but his real bent was towards 
engineering, and ultimately he became an apprentice with Messrs. Rowan & Co., 

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Biographies 



marine engineers. In 1915, though still well under eighteen years of age, he applied 
for enlistment in the Scottish Horse. The recruiting sergeants in those critical 
days when the need for men was great did not trouble about birth certificates, 
and William Robertson, tall, straight, strong, with open countenance, ready smile, 
had no difficulty in securing acceptance. In the autumn of 1915 he went with his 
unit to Gallipoli, and came through the horrors of that campaign unscathed. After 
a term in Egypt he was sent to the Balkans, but in February, 1918, he was invalided 
home with malaria. His friends noticed that the privations and sickness through 
which he had passed had damped the old exuberance of spirits, and made him serious 
and thoughtful beyond his years. In October, 1918, he was again passed fit for 
general service, and proceeded to France, where he was attached to The Black 
Watch. There he fell in action on the 4th November while in the act of assisting 
a wounded comrade back to the dressing station. His company commander writing 
home said, " I cannot speak too highly of the work done by your son all the time he 
was with the company. He never had a thought for himself." With these words 
as epitaph, his family and friends should feel that his life has been rounded off 
in perfect measure. 

WILLIAM E. ROBINSON 

Captain, 1 6th Batt. H.LJ. 

Educated at Hillhead High School and Allan Glen's School, Captain Robinson, 
in life and in death, did honour to both schools. His was indeed a life of service 
from start to finish. He was one of the pioneers in the Scout movement, and until 
he joined the Army acted as scoutmaster of the St. Mary's troop, one of the most 
efficient bodies of Boy Scouts in the country. There was something almost of 
idolatry in the admiration of his boys for him, due, no doubt, to the fact that he 
had got a look far " ben " into boy feelings and boy aspirations. At least eight 
of them followed their chief into the Army, and now hold commissions. He was 
also an enthusiastic Volunteer and Territorial, holding the rank of colour-sergeant 
in the old 1st Lanark Volunteers, and subsequently in the 5th Scottish Rifles. When 
war broke out Captain Robinson was on the commercial staff of the Glasgow Herald. 
On the formation of the Glasgow battalions he was offered a captaincy in the 
16th (Boys' Brigade) Battalion, and there he gained the confidence and affection 
of his men as naturally and as inevitably as formerly of his boys. He went to the 
Front in November, 1915, and when home on a short visit afterwards was in his 
usual high spirits. He saw much fierce fighting, but came through safely till the 
18th November, 1916, when he fell in action. The last authentic glimpse that we get 
of him is from a fellow-officer, who reports seeing him in the midst of a small party 
of men surrounded by Germans, but disdaining surrender, and fighting desperately 
till the last. In recording the death of men like Captain Robinson there is an over- 
powering sense of irreparable loss and waste. Doubtless it is not so. Let us keep 
high our faith in the wise ordering of our lives even in these terrible days. Captain 
Robinson was only thirty -two, but what " a crowded hour of glorious life " was 
his. 

WILLIAM RODGER, B.Sc. 

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers 

Lieutenant William Rodger was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. William Rodger, 
1 Partickhill Road. Of courteous manners and attractive personality, he was a great 

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Hillhead High School 



favourite both with teachers and classmates. He impressed all with whom he came 
in contact with his ability, strength of character, and devotion to duty, and he seemed 
clearly marked out for a career of success and usefulness. School games did not 
make much appeal to him, but he was fond of the open air, and was a keen lover 
of Nature, and a shrewd observer of its changing aspects and moods. On leaving 
School he entered Glasgow University as a student in engineering. There he had 
a most successful career, passing his B.Sc. degree in mathematics, natural philo- 
sophy, and geology with special distinction. In 1913 he gained a Strang Bursary 
in civil engineering and 2nd prize in mathematics. The following year he gained 
the Muir Bursary and a prize in English. Early in his University course he joined 
the O.T.C. When war began, however, he did not wait for a commission, but, 
together with some fifty more of the corps, enlisted as a private in Lochiel's 
Camerons. We cannot prize too highly those ardent and unselfish spirits who choose 
" the instant path," and put ease and comfort behind them in pursuit of an ideal. 
Private Rodger, with his fine record and gallant bearing, was soon singled out for 
a commission, and in May, 1915, proceeded to France as a subaltern in the Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders. When the Macedonian expedition was projected in 
the autumn of 1915 he was sent to Salonica, and attached temporarily to the R.E. 
There he found his metier, and was recommended for permanent service in the 
Engineers. He returned to Chatham for a three months' course in military 
engineering. In November, 1916, he went to France once more, when he saw 
much service with a field company. In July, 1917, while building bridges at 
Nieuport, Belgium, under heavy shell fire,. he was badly gassed, and was invalided 
home. He never fully recovered from the effects of this poisoning, and on the 1st 
November, 1918, while still in hospital, he died of pneumonia, following influenza. 
In him the country has lost a very gallant gentleman and a most useful citizen. 



THOMAS ROURKE 
Cyclist, The Lancashire Fusiliers 

Thomas Rourke, better known as Tommy, was the eldest son of the late Mr. 
James Rourke, assistant superintendent, Glasgow Parks, and of Mrs. Rourke, 4 
Vinicombe Street, Hillhead. He enlisted in September, 1915, in the Lowland 
Division Cyclist Corps when he was seventeen years of age. In 1916 he was offered 
a commission, but refused it, as he thought it would delay his chances of seeing 
active service. On account of his age he was unable to proceed to France, but on 
being transferred to The Lancashire Fusiliers in 1917 he went to France in August of 
that year. Tommy was immediately in the thick of the fighting, and was always 
one of the first to volunteer for any hazardous duty. On the night of 1st December, 
1917, he took part in a raid on the German lines at Passchendaele, and was, unfor- 
tunately, seriously wounded by an explosive bullet. He was one of the two survivors 
out of a band of thirty, and lay for two days in the mud before being rescued. His 
left leg was amputated at a field dressing station, and on Hogmanay he was sent home 
to hospital in England. 

He never complained in any way, and was always in the best of spirits. Unfor- 
tunately, he had received a touch of poisonous gas when he was wounded, and this 
slowly undermined his splendid constitution. In March, 1920, his father died 
suddenly. Tommy never got over the shock, and died on 24th April, 1920. I was 
informed by the surgeons in charge of the Royal Infirmary that he must have been 
suffering pain for months without uttering a single complaint. He was of a retiring 

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Biographies 



nature, but was very popular with his friends, and was always ready to do any one 
a good turn. The utmost sympathy goes out to his widowed mother, brother, and 
sister. 

JOHN NICOLL SANDERSON 

Gunner, R.G.A. 

Gunner J. N. Sanderson was the elder son of the late Mr. John Sanderson, 
outfitter, Union Street and Sauchiehall Street, and Mrs. Sanderson, 22 Ancaster 
Drive, Glasgow. Those who knew him at School will recall the singular charm of 
his personality. There was a cheery optimism about him of the best kind, and for 
him the wheels of School life always ran smooth. On leaving School he entered 
his father's business, which he carried on after the latter's death. As soon as he 
was able to make arrangements for the management in his absence he joined the 
Bute Mountain Battery, and proceeded to Salonica in September, 1916. The 
Macedonian campaign was one of the " side shows " regarding whose utility there 
was much diversity of opinion. In the end it proved a glorious success, for there 
was struck the first hammer blow in the downfall of the Huns. There is no doubt, 
however, that our soldiers there felt that their hardships and privations were but 
scantily recognised at home, and there was no little bitterness in consequence. 
Here John Sanderson's cheery disposition was put to an acid test, and by the 
evidence of all his comrades it came triumphantly through. He took part in the 
final offensive against the Bulgarian Army and came through safely. Unhappily 
he fell a victim to the wide-world scourge »of influenza, and pneumonia supervening, 
he passed away at the base hospital at Salonica on the 17th October, 1918. One 
of his comrades who had endured with him all the vicissitudes of a two years' 
campaign in billet and bivouac, writes — " I have to mourn the loss of one of the 
best of pals and the most unselfish and uncomplaining of comrades." The sincere 
sympathy of the School goes out to his widowed mother and relatives. 



EDWIN SCHONFIELD 

Captain, The London Regiment 

Captain Edwin Schonfield, second son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Schonfield, 10 
Royal Crescent, West, was one of a family who have carried off many honours 
at Hillhead High School, and are held in great regard by all the members of 
the staff. He was a native of the city, and was in his twenty-seventh year. 
Soon after leaving School he travelled for several years over the greater part 
of Europe. In August, 1914, he had booked his passage to America, but he 
speedily changed his tourist's garb for the King's uniform. He was gazetted 
second lieutenant in The London Regiment in October, 1914. He was made 
lieutenant in December, 1915, and captain in August, 1916. He went through 
much of the heavy fighting on the Somme, and fell in action on the 20th 
September, 1916. His commanding officer writes, " I cannot tell you how 
deeply we all feel the loss of your son, and our sympathies with you in your 
great bereavement. Your son has been a model of efficiency out here. No work 
or duty was too hard or too difficult for him, and his name had been forwarded 
some time ago for promotion." Another officer writes, " His cool, enduring 
courage, his personal example, and his ever cheerful disposition were to us 
such a blessing and asset that we can never replace him." By the testimony 

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Hillhead High School 



of all his friends, the master-notes in Edwin Schonfield's character were his 
unfailing cheerfulness, which was proof against all the trials and hardships of 
trench life, and his intense sense of duty. The memory of these qualities will 
be a lasting and precious possession to his friends and old school-fellows. 



DAVID ROBERTSON SILLARS 

Captain, 12th H.L.I. 

Captain David Robertson Sillars was the younger son of the late Mr. David 
R. Sillars, Helensburgh, and Mrs. Sillars, 10 Rokeby Terrace, Hillhead, 
Glasgow. Bertson, as he was always called, will long he tenderly remembered 
by the present pupils for the fine spirit with which he entered into all the 
activities of School life. Big, powerful, energetic, he was specially keen on 
sport, and at all times " played the game." His was the happy spirit which 
sees the sunshine in everything, and there were few situations out of which he 
could not extract a gleam of humour. His energies were not all absorbed by 
the physical side of School life. He had good ability, and always took a 
creditable place in his classes. He early made up his mind for a medical 
career, and while still at School he joined the R.A.M.C. (Territorials), and in 
August, 1914, he was mobilised with the 4th Scottish General Hospital. Bertson, 
with his high spirits and eager nature, doubtless chafed at the routine of 
stretcher drill, and in June, 1915, obtained a transfer to the Cyclist Company 
of the 65th (Lowland) Division, and rapidly rose to the rank of sergeant. In 
January, 1917, he was given a commission in the Highland Light Infantry, 
and proceeded overseas with his regiment in time to take part in the latter 
stages of the Battle of the Somme. In the beginning of 1917 he was attached 
to the Intelligence Staff of the 4th Army. Three monthi later he rejoined his 
old battalion as Intelligence Officer. At the first Battle of Arras he was 
wounded, and invalided home. On being passed fit for general service he re- 
joined his old battalion towards the close of 1917. During the great German 
offensive he saw much heavy fighting, and fell to a sniper's bullet on 4th June, 
1918. Bertson was not only a dashing soldier, but looked the part. His 
round of service for one so young — he was only twenty-one — was extraordinarily 
varied, and it must indeed have been sterling qualities that gave him in four 
years promotion through all the grades of non-commissioned rank in the 
R.A.M.C. and Cyclist Corps to fall at last a full Captain in the Infantry. 



DONALD SINCLAIR 

Lieutenant, R.F.C. 

Lieutenant Donald Sinclair was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Sinclair, 32 Viewmount Drive, Maryhill. At School, as all through life, he 
was the very embodiment of cheerfulness and good humour, and his super- 
abundant spirits and hearty, boyish laughter were as a tonic to his friends. 
He owed much to the Boy Scout movement in his early years, and this debt he 
amply repaid later, becoming patrol leader, and assistant scoutmaster in the 
82nd Glasgow Troop, connected with Maryhill United Free Church. On leaving 
School he entered the service of Napier Brothers, Glasgow, as an apprentice 
engineer. Between work and evening classes he had not much leisure, yet he 

188 



Biographies 



found time to cultivate his rare musical gifts. His services as a vocalist were 
much sought after, and for the benefit of worthy causes were as willingly 
rendered. On the outbreak of war he joined the 6th H.L.I, as a private, and 
speedily rose through all the grades of non-commissioned rank. He was soon 
recommended for a commission, and, after a period in a Cadet battalion, was 
attached to the 7th H.L.I, as second lieutenant. After serving there for some 
time he was transferred to the Royal Flying Corps. There his knowledge of 
engines and his mechanical skill were of the greatest value, and he was fre- 
quently employed as instructor. Just before leaving for France for the last 
time he paid a visit to the School. His spirits were as high as of old, but 
underneath his care-free attitude there were signs of a keen realisation of the 
serious things of life. He was only a few days in France when he was killed 
in an aerial engagement over the German lines, 18th December, 1917. His 
observer, writing home, says — " He had not been with us many days, but even 
in that short time we had all been particularly impressed by his capabilties 
as a pilot, by his pluck, his keenness, and his conspicuous cheeriness. When 
we lost him we lost a cheery companion and a brave colleague, one who would, 
without doubt, have brought further honour to the Royal Flying Corps." 



FRED BASS SINCLAIR 

Lance'Corporal, 6th H.L.I. 

Lance-Corporal Fred B. Sinclair was the second son of Dr. and Mrs. 
Sinclair, Millport. Like his brothers, he received most of his education at 
Hillhead High School. He was a somewhat reserved and diffident boy among 
strangers, but in the company of intimates he was cheery and bright, and had 
plenty to say for himself. He was a steady, reliable worker at School, and 
always took a creditable place in his classes. He was looking forward to 
farming as a career, but the war intervened, and he became a soldier instead. 
In November, 1915, he enlisted in the 6th H.L.I. , and after a long period of 
training in this country he went to France in the autumn of 1916. He came 
through much rough ^ campaigning, which he accepted in his usual imperturbable 
fashion. He was slightly wounded in January, 1917, and more seriously in 
May of the same year. After some months in hospital he was again reported 
fit for service, and left for France in March, 1918. This time he was attached 
to the 1st R.S.F. He was not in the front line two weeks when he was again 
seriously wounded, losing the sight of his left eye. In June, 1918, he was^dis- 
chaiged from the colours as unfit for further service. He remained at home 
convalescing during the winter, and was looking forward to work on a farm 
when spring came round. In February, 1919, while on a visit to Glasgow he 
contracted pneumonia, and passed away on the last day of the month, ao-ed 
twenty-one years. The memory of his sterling character and unfailing devotion 
to duty will long be cherished by his friends and old schoolfellows. 



GEORGE HENRY SLOAN 

Captain, 2nd Scottish Horse 
George Henry Sloan, third surviving son of Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Sloan, 
5 Somerset Place, died on 16th November, 1915, from wounds received at the 
Gallipoli Peninsula. Captain Sloan seemed to have the joy of battle in his 

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Hilihead High School 



blood. He was one of the first to volunteer for the South African War, and 
there he won for himself the reputation of being a dashing and resolute soldier. 
When war broke out in August, 1914, he helped to raise a Legion of Frontiers- 
men in Vancouver, and offered their services to the Government. The Govern- 
ment, as usual, was in no hurry to come to a decision, and the eager soldier, 
chafing at inactivity when great deeds were afoot in Europe, wired his offer to 
Lord Roberts, and through his good offices the corps was soon in England. 
Here, however, it was disbanded, and its members merged in other regiments. 
Captain Sloan was offered and accepted a captaincy in the 2nd Scottish Horse, 
and proceeded with them to Gallipoli. It was characteristic of him that he 
should meet his death while trying to bring one of his wounded men into a 
place of safety. He was the soul of kindness and good fellowship, and in the 
opinion of all who knew him a very gallant gentleman. A fellow officer, 
Lieutenant Aitken, writes of him, " I had the honour to call George my best 
friend, and can assure you that I never met a finer soldier and gentleman. If 
I could have been taken and he left, the Empire would have been the gainer, but 
we have not the arranging of these things." 



GEORGE EVANSTON SMITH 

Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) 

George Evanston Smith was born 5th April, 1894. He was educated at 
Hilihead High School and the Technical College. He was passionately fond of 
music, and as a boy was soprano soloist at St. Mary's Cathedral. Had he lived 
he would have won distinction for himself both as pianist and organist. He 
was an active member of the 49th Glasgow Troop of Scouts, and for some years 
acted as Scoutmaster. He was also a member of the Officers' Training Corps. 
By profession he was an analytical chemist, and when war began was studying 
at the Technical College preparing for the final examination for his degree. 
The tumult and the discord of battle must have been highly distasteful to his 
sensitive and artistic nature, but all this he put resolutely aside, and the urgent 
call of King and country found him ready. In August, 1914, he received a 
commission in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 2nd Battalion, and after 
a period of training he proceeded to France. He fell gloriously at the head of 
his men on the fatal 25th of September, 1915. 



GEORGE L. SOMMERVILLE 

Captain, King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) 

Captain George L. Sommerville, younger son of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Sommerville, Ardvar, Lansdowne Avenue, Anniesland, was deeply attached to 
his old School, and seldom lost an opportunity of looking in upon his old masters. 
At School he took a high place in Science and Mathematics, and excelled in all 
forms of games. He was a keen Cadet, and on leaving School transferred to the 
University O.T.C. (Senior Section). Prior to the war he was an analytical 
chemist in the employment of Messrs. Brotherton & Co., Glasgow and Leeds. 
When the call to service came he made instant response, joining Lochiel's Camerons 
as a private. Through his O.T.C. connection he was soon offered a commission. 
He saw much service and gained rapid promotion, being gazetted captain shortly 

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Biographies 



before his last fight. He was wounded at Tpres and Loos, and had but shortly 
returned to the Front for the third time when he fell in a gallant attack on the 
German trenches on the 16th August, 1916, his twenty-third birthday. One of 
his brother officers writes, " He was wounded early, but bravely held on, and 
was killed in the second advance." His commanding officer says, " I came to 
look upon your son as a brave and capable soldier, and I promoted him to com- 
mand a company only the other day. He possessed the courage and coolness 
characteristic of his nationality." 



COLIN C STEWART 

Private, 17th Batt. H.L.L 

Private Colin C. Stewart, son of ex-Bailie John Stewart and Mrs. Stewart, 
Ardsheal, Scotstounhill, was educated at Hillhead High School and Morrison's 
Academy, Crieff. At School, both here and in Crieff, he was an active member 
of the O.T.C. (Junior Division), and when war began he quickly responded to 
the call of King and country, and enlisted in the Chamber of Commerce Bat- 
talion, where he had for comrades many of his old schoolfellows. In November, 
1915, he went to France, where he was severely wounded. He was in hospital 
for three months, and, after a short holiday at home, he again went to the 
Front. On the 1st of July, 1916, he was killed while storming the German 
trenches at La Boiselle. A comrade, writing home to Bailie Stewart, said, " We 
had advanced on the German trenches, and between the first and the second lines 
your son fell. He was a perfect soldier, cheery ever. We were both in the 
same section, and it may help you a little to know that no one was more loved 
for his kindness or more admired for his bravery than he." Could one ask for 
a more beautiful and touching epitaph? 



GEORGE STEWART, M.A. 

Captain, 26th Batt. The Northumberland Fusiliers 

By the death in action of Captain George Stewart, head of the English 
Department, the School has suffered grievous loss. Though his term here has to 
be reckoned in months rather than in years, he made a deep and abiding im- 
pression on our School life. It is not easy to analyse the causes of this ex- 
ceptional influence, but some at least lie on the surface. For one thing, he was 
an incomparable teacher. He ruled his pupils as a magician, and seemed to 
rivet their attention by some occult charm of his own. He was at home with 
the great names in English literature, and had caught from them the breath and 
finer essence of all knowledge. With sure step he led his pupils into 
those realms of gold that stir, the heart and quicken imagination, and 
seldom failed to inspire them with some of his own fine enthusiasm. 
He was ever honest in his criticisms, and insisted that they should 
be the same. If he did not like a thing he said so, no matter 
what great or revered name was attached to it. He lived in and for his work, 
and threw himself with ardour into all the School activities — games, literary 
society, everything, indeed, that touched upon the corporate life and welfare of 
the School. But the real secret of his power must be looked for neither in his 
knowledge nor in his zeal, but in his character. He radiated sincerity, earnest- 

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ness, and moral strength, qualities that never fail to attract and hold young 
people. His very austerity, lit up though it was from time to time by a rich 
humour and a caustic wit, and his cloak of reserve, unveiled but rarely even to 
his intimates, marked him out as a man apart. The obvious does not appeal 
to pupils. Here was something of an enigma that baffled, yet attracted. But to 
the simplest it was at least plain that here also was one who lived and worked 
as ever in the Great Taskmaster's eye. 

In March, 1915, Mr. Stewart applied for a commission, and in April was 
gazetted to the 26th Northumberland Fusiliers, the Tyneside Irish. Those who 
did not know Mr. Stewart well expressed surprise at his joining up so early. 
He had been a lover of books from his youth up. He had taken little or no part 
in games either as man or boy. War and strife were hateful to his well-ordered 
views of life. All this they knew, but they did not know that he hated injustice 
and unrighteousness still more, and held it to be not only a duty but a moral 
necessity to kill the accursed thing. It mav be, too, as some of his friends think, 
that under the austere robe of the schoolmaster there burned the soul of the 
adventurer. His reading and his thinking had led him into the company of the 
happy warriors, and he followed in their tread with as light a step and high a 
heart as any paladin of old. 

He proceeded to France in January, 1916, and had a long and trying experi- 
ence in the trenches. In the great advance of 1st July, 1916, he was seriously 
wounded in the head and arm, and was in hospital at home for some months. 
At the beginning of 1917 he rejoined his regiment, and after a spell of light duty 
he returned to the Front in March, 1917. He had not long been back with his 
old battalion when he was promoted acting captain. His letters from the Front 
were always bright and cheery, and the one written to his wife on the 5th June, the 
day of his death, was no exception to the rule. In it, with his usual consideration, 
he did not even say he was within the danger zone. The final scene may best be 
told in the words of his commanding officer, " Your husband was out super- 
intending the digging of a new trench across No Man's Land, and was killed by 
a shell. The battalion can ill afford to lose such an officer, cool, quiet, brave 
under all circumstances, with a wonderful devotion to duty, he was loved and 
respected by us all; his thoughts were always for the good of those under him, 
and it is small wonder that the men had such great trust and faith in him." 
This is a striking tribute, and as true of Mr. Stewart, the teacher, as of Captain 
Stewart, the soldier. As a colleague the headmaster would like to say of him 
in addition that he never made difficulties, and he always saw opportunities. 
In him he has lost not only a valued colleague, but a dear friend. 



WALTER ROSS TAYLOR STEWART 

Lieutenant 9th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) 

Lieutenant W. R. T. Stewart, youngest son of the late Mr. James Stewart 
and of Mrs. Stewart, 13 Queen's Terrace, West, like all others who came from 
distant countries to the help of the Motherland, deserves a specially generous 
meed of praise. He was in Brazil, as representative of the United Machine 
Cotton Company, Limited, when the great conflagration burst forth, but when- 
ever he realised how imperative was the need for men, he came home to place 
his services at the disposal of his country. He received a commission as lieu- 
tenant in the 9th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and, with his athletic 
frame and strong, resolute face, he looked every inch the part. After a period 

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of training in this country he proceeded to France, and fell in action on the 
6th of August, 1916, in his twenty-ninth year. Major Rorke, who commands 
the Reserve Battalion of the 9th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, writing 
to Mrs. Stewart, says, " I specially liked your boy for his seriousness and his 
anxiety to learn and understand every branch of the military profession, so 
that he might do his duty well. He was killed while looking after the safety 
of his men and died a most honourable death." In all the relations of life he 
upheld the prestige of his School and the honour of his name. 



ALEXANDER M. STIRLING 

Private, 16th Batt. H.L.L 

Private Stirling's career as a soldier was short but highly honourable. He 
had no love for soldiering as such, but he saw clearly that personal considera- 
tions should sink before national needs, and so after more than one rejection 
he was enrolled in His Majesty's Forces. At School Private Stirling took a high 
place in his classes, but specially excelled in Latin and Greek. He took a great 
interest in all School games, and was an invaluable member of the Rugby team. 
On leaving School he entered the University, gaining a United Free Church 
Scholarship of £20 for three years. At the close of his first (and, alas, his last 
session) he passed in Latin, Greek, and Mathematics for the degree of M.A. 
Private Stirling had a very high sense of duty and an extreme conscientiousness, 
and it seemed to his friends that he was predestined for the ministry. His own 
inclinations led strongly that way also, but when war broke out he joined the 
16th Battalion H.L.L, and went into training at Gailes. There he contracted 
scarlet fever, to which he succumbed on 12th December, 1914, after one day in 
hospital. His death was a great blow to his comrades in the camp, in the 
Church, and in the University. 

ARCH. C. TAYLOR 

2nd Lieutenant, 23rd Battalion The Northumberland Fusiliers 

Second Lieutenant Archibald C. Taylor, fourth son of the late Mr. William M. 
Taylor, and Mrs. Taylor, 43 Partickhill Road, was born in 1895. He was educated 
at Hillhead High School, where his frank nature and sunny disposition won for him 
hosts of friends. After a short period of study in the Royal Technical College he 
entered the service of Alexander Stirling as a commercial traveller. He was an 
enthusiastic Volunteer, and spent many years in the Glasgow Yeomanry, retiring in 
1913 with the rank of sergeant. On the outbreak of war he rejoined his old 
regiment, and went to France in August, 1915. In November of the following year 
he was recommended for a commission, and in January, 1917, joined the 23rd 
Northumberland Fusiliers as second lieutenant. On the night of the 28th April, 
while holding the line near Arras, his battalion was ordered to capture certain enemy 
trenches one hour before daybreak. Lieutenant Taylor led on his men in the face 
of a hail of bullets, and escaped unhurt, till quite near the enemy's trenches when a 
machine gun opened fire, and he fell mortally wounded. A keen and enthusiastic 
soldier who had done admirable work at Ypres and Neuve Eglise, ignorant of fear, 
equal to every demand of arms whether in the observation post or the attack, and 
with a certain lovable tenderness about him, Lieutenant Taylor has left in the hearts 
of all who knew him the glad and enriching memories of a good comrade. 

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Hillhead High School 



JAMES K. TAYLOR 

Private. 6th H.L.I. 

Private James K. Taylor was the only son of Mr. David Taylor, O.B.E., and 
of Mrs. Taylor, 30 Lawrence Street, Partick. In civil life he was an apprentice 
naval architect, and was employed with Messrs. Barclay, Curie & Co. in their 
drawing office. He was a good student at School, and sought to qualify himself 
for his life work by attendance at the Technical College. There his application 
and keenness brought him to the front, and a bright career seemed opening up 
before him when the call came for other service. Like so many more Hillhead 
High School boys he was an active member of the 6th H.L.I. , and on the 4th 
August, 1914, his regiment was mobilised for active service together with other 
Territorial units which went to form the glorious 52nd Lowland Division. In 
May, 1915, he sailed for Egypt, and from there proceeded to the Dardanelles in 
time to take part in the heroic but ill-fated attack on Achi Baba. He was one 
of the few who passed in safety through the perils, privations, and sickness of 
that campaign, but during the evacuation of Cape Helles in January, 1916, he 
received a slight wound which kept him in hospital for some time in Mudros and 
later in Egypt. He recovered in time to take part in the first Battle of Gaza, 
and aferwards shared in the hardships and glories of the advance on Palestine. 
In the spring of 1918, when the great German onslaught threatened to overwhelm 
our forces, the 52nd Division was recalled to the Western Front. There on the 
27th September Private Taylor was wounded during an attack on Moeuvres, a 
place that will be for ever associated with the deathless deeds of the 52nd 
Division. The chaplain, writing to the parents, told them that their son had 
died in hospital on 4th October, and was buried with military honours in 
Abbeville cemetery. " I trust," he added, " that you will be comforted by the 
knowledge that he was a brave man. and in a brave fight he bravely died." 



GEORGE C. THOMPSON 

Private, 14th Batt. Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) 

Private George C. Thompson was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. G. A. 
Thompson, 197 Garrioch Road, Maryhill. At Sciiool he is still remembered as a 
bright, frank, cheery youth, who put heart and conscience into all his work. 
From School he proceeded to Anderson's College to study chemistry, and later 
joined the firm of Messrs. Ardoll, Limited, Selby, Yorkshire, as analytical 
chemist. In 1915 he joined the Commercial and Professional Battalion of the 
A. & S.H., and proceeded with them to France in June, 1916. After some 
months' service he was invalided home, but made a good recovery, and was soon 
back again in the firing line. On the opening day of the Battle of Arras, 9th 
April, 1917, he fell in that great and successful advance, aged twenty-one years. 
Private Thompson took an active part in all the activities of St. George's 
Episcopal Church, Maryhill, being a member of the choir and of the Boys' 
Brigade and Scouts. During his last year in the Brigade he brought honour 
to his company by winning the Glasgow championship for bugle playing. He 
fell in the hour of victory, doing his duty manfully and cheerfully, and his old 
School, with sad but proud hearts, enrols him amongst her heroes. 

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ADRIAN J, R. THOMSON 

Corporal, 5th Batt, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 
Corporal Adrian Thomson was the only surviving son of the late Major H. J. 
Thomson, V.D., and Mrs. Thomson, formerly 41 Elgin Terrace, Dowanhill, and 
now Ashgrove, Montford, Bute. While at School he was highly popular both with 
his fellows and teachers. He was an enthusiastic member of the Cadet Corps, 
and on the formation of B Company of the 6th H.L.I, as a Hillhead High School 
unit he was one of the first to join. He had a high sense of duty and a passion 
for service, and gave much of his leisure to the affairs of the Boys' Brigade, in 
which he was an officer. When war broke out he did not wait for a commission 
as he might well have done, in view of his education, character, and training, 
but entered the ranks of the Camerons as a private. On the 25th September, 
1915, when the Camerons covered themselves with deathless glory, he was reported 
missing, and nothing has since been heard of him. Much sympathy is felt for 
his widowed mother and sisters, all the more so as this is the second sacrifice 
they have been called upon to make, an elder brother having been accidentally 
killed by the explosion of a cannon during artillery practice at Troon several 
years ago. 



WILLIAM J.THOMSON 

2nd Lieutenant, 3rd Batt. The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 

William J. Thomson, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Thomson, I Kersland 
Street, Hillhead, during his School career, was equally keen on his lessons and 
games, and won distinction in both fields. His interest in Rugby continued to 
the end, and he played several games during his period of training. He was 
for several years a member of the Western Baths, and won many prizes for 
diving and swimming. He was also a prominent member of the water polo team. 
As an old School Cadet and Territorial of four years' service he might well have 
waited for a commission, but he felt the call for men too urgent, and in 
September, 1914, joined the Chamber of Commerce Battalion. During his period 
of training at Troon he was asked to assist in the training of the Troon Citizen 
Corps. His work there was so much appreciated that on leaving he was presented 
by the members with a gold watch bearing a suitable inscription. In July, 1915, 
he obtained a commission, and was posted to the 3rd Cameron Highlanders. In 
August, 1916, he went to France, where he was attached to the 1st Camerons. 
After a brief but crowded three months of service he was mortally wounded in 
action on 18th November. The School mourns for him as a loyal son who main- 
tained his interest in her to the last. He was twenty-seven years of age. 



EMILE LUCIEN ROBERT-TISSOT 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) 

Emile L. Robert-Tissot was the younger and only surviving son of the late 
L. E. Robert-Tissot, M.A.(Oxon), for many years the distinguished Lecturer in 
French at the Athenaeum, Glasgow, and of Mrs. Robert-Tissot, 7 Rupert Street. 
At School Emile was not over-studious, nor was he keen on games, but both as 
boy and man he had a love for things pure and beautiful and of good report. 

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Hillhead High School 



He was brought up in the sunshine of a cultured home, and when his father 
died he and his brother Jean centred all their love and devotion on their mother. 
" East or west," to them home was ever best. On leaving School Emile entered 
a bank, where his integrity, fidelity, and zeal received full recognition. When 
he was of military age he followed his brother Jean into the A. & S.H. He 
proceeded to France in the autumn of 1917, where he proved himself a brave, 
reliable, cheery soldier. His regiment played a great part in the Cambrai 
retreat, and throughout all the hardships and privations it entailed Emile 
" carried on " in his old tranquil, uncomplaining fashion. In March, 1918, 
he was home on leave, and every one in School was delighted to see what a 
fine, manly, stalwart fellow he had grown. He returned to France as the great 
push was beginning, but was detained at the base for some time, and so missed 
that experience. He wrote home to say that he was joining up his division, the 
famous 51st, which had been ordered north for a rest. There, however, the 
tempest of battle broke on them again with renewed fury, and the gallant Emile 
fell mortally wounded on the 12th April. His company commander writes, " His 
comrades all speak highly of him, and he was both an efficient soldier and a 
gallant gentleman." The sincerest and tenderest sympathy of the School goes 
out to his widowed mother, who has given both her sons to the great cause. 



JEAN ULYSSE ROBERT/TISSQT 

Private, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) 

Jean Ulysse Robert-Tissot was the elder son of the late L. E. Robert-Tissot, 
M.A.(Oxon), for many years Lecturer in French at the Athenaeum, Glasgow, and 
of Mrs. Robert-Tissot, 7 Rupert Street, W. Jean, as he was familiarly known, 
was a prime favourite at School both with masters and pupils. He took a 
philosophical view of life, and found humour in things where others found tears. 
He had good ability, but preferred the bypaths to the high roads of learning. 
In his fine courtesy, perfect manners, and kindly wit he was typically French, 
and his soft liquid accents will long linger in the memory of his old schoolfellows. 
On leaving School he joined the firm of Messrs. Spencer, Moulton & Co., motor 
tyre manufacturers, by whom his sterling character and devoted services were 
greatly esteemed. Early in 1916 he joined the Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers, and after a short period of training proceeded to France. He saw 
much hard fighting and endured many hardships, but he accepted everything 
with unperturbed tranquillity. On the morning of 21st August, 1917, during 
an advance in Flanders he was struck by a piece of shrapnel, and died im- 
mediately. The gallant Jean now rests in a British cemetery together with many 
other " kindly Scots " who fell the same day. The heartfelt sympathy of the 
School goes out to his widowed mother. 



JOHN TODD, M.M. 

Sergeant, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) 

Sergeant John Todd was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. John Todd, 9 
Huntly Terrace, North Kelvinside. He was a fine type of pupil, courteous, 
attentive, diligent, emphatically a " trier." A sense of humour is usually a 
late development of schoolboys, but with John Todd it showed itself early, and 

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remained prominent to the last. He served an apprenticeship in the Glasgow 
Rubber Company, Maryhill, and was about to assist his father in the management 
when war began. Like most of our boys, he had no hesitation about deciding 
what his duty was at such a time, and early in August, 1914, he joined The 
Royal Scots as a private. He left for France in the spring of 1915, and for 
over three years he took part in every action fought by his Division. He was 
severely wounded in March, 1918, but after a short convalescence he volunteered 
again for France, although he was pressed to accept a commission. On the 26th 
July, while taking part in the first stages of the victorious advance, he was struck 
by a machine gun bullet, and killed outrignt. In the evidence of all his officers 
and comrades he showed exceptional powers of leadership, and has left a record 
of which his School may well be proud. He gained the Military Medal for 
gallantry and resource in action, and was awarded a bar to it for similar conduct 
during a later engagement. His company commander, writing home, says, " I 
personally had the greatest regard and affection for him, and he was my best 
sergeant. I should like you to realise fully the extent of his reputation for 
bravery and coolness. At the retirement on the Somme he three times led his 
company to the charge, and if he received no further decoration for it (he certainly 
earned the V.C. that day), it was because no officer survived to recommend him." 
Such appreciation and praise may well temper sorrow to his relatives and friends, 
while intensifying the sense of the country's loss in the death of so gallant a 
soldier. 



FREDERICK WHITECROSS TURNER 

2nd Lieutenant 5th Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 

Second Lieutenant Fred. W. Turner was the elder son of Mr. Fred. Turner, 
organist of Wellington U.F. Church, and of Mrs. Turner, 6 Elliott Street, Hill- 
head. Lieut. Turner passed through all the classes in Hillhead High School, 
and was held in great esteem by his teachers and comrades, to whom his quiet, 
unassuming manner and upright, reliable character made strong appeal. On 
leaving School he entered the service of the Scottish Amicable Life Assurance 
Society. _ There his kindly, sympathetic disposition gained for him many friends, 
while his industry and talents won the approval rf his chiefs. The " pomp and 
glorious circumstance of war " made no appeal to his refined and gentle nature, 
but to the call of duty he gave instant heed. 

October, 1914, saw him in the ranks of the 5th Scottish Rifles, and in 
September of the following year he was gazetted as second lieutenant in the same 
regiment. He went to France in September, 1916, when he saw much hard 
fighting, but came safely through it all till the 9th of April, 1917. On that day 
late in the afternoon he fell at the head of his platoon in an attack on the last 
line of German trenches after gallantly leading his men through 2J miles of 
German trenches, " the biggest advance," according to his commanding officer, 
" made by any British battalion on one day." It is at least some satisfaction 
to his relatives and friends that he fell in the full tide of victory, and with the 
satisfaction of a great day's work greatly done. His company commander 
testifies that in his absence Lieut. Turner took over command and acquitted 
himself in a manner that won the special commendation of the commanding 
officer, who states that " his quiet, unostentatious work, done efficiently under 
most trying circumstances, made him one of the most esteemed and best-liked 
officers in the battalion." 

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Hillhead High School 



JACK TURNER 

2nd Lieutenant, Tank Corps 

Second Lieutenant Jack Turner was the younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas 
Turner, 27 Park Drive, South, Whiteinch. Jack was a bright, lively spirit, 
full of fun, and bubbling over with happiness. He is still vividly remembered 
in School by all his teachers. Like so many more Hillhead High School boys, he 
was an active member of the First Glasgow Group of Boy Scouts, and rose to be 
patrol leader of the Kangaroos. From 1907 to 1910 he was attached to the 
34th Company, Boys' Brigade, and was soon promoted corporal. At School he 
took a keen interest in Rugby, and on leaving he joined the Former Pupils' 
section, playing regularly for the 2nd XV. After gaining an introduction to 
naval architecture in the service of the British Corporation for the Registry of 
Shipping, he entered Messrs. Barclay, Curie & Co.'s yard for practical training. 
He was mobilised in August, 1914, with the l/6th H.L.I., and afterwards went 
with his battalion overseas. He came safely through the dangers, hardships, 
and privations of the Gallipoli campaign, and shared also in the heavy fighting 
in the Sinai desert. He was recommended for a commission, and on account 
of his practical training was gazetted to the Tank Corps. He was only a few 
days in France when the great German drive on the Somme began. There the 
tanks played a great part, and it was largely through their self-sacrifice and that of the 
artillery that the infantry were given time to retire. In the fighting on the 22nd March, 
1918, Lieut. Turner's tank was seen to be struck by a shell, but nothing was known of the 
fate of its commander and crew. A month later intimation was received that Lieut. 
Turner had died at Cassel, Germany, on the 1 2th April, of wounds received in action on 
the 22nd March. Although he passed away on foreign soil, doubtless some kindly Scots 
would be with him at the last to comfort and console. 

FRANK M'EWAN WATSON 

2nd Lieutenant, 55th Company, M.G.C 

Lieutenant Frank M'Ewan Watson was the eldest son of John Watson, 6 
Ardgowan Terrace, Sandyford. He is remembered at School as a tall, finely 
developed boy, of pleasant manners and bright disposition. He was fond of 
all manner of games, but did not neglect his work, and showed special aptitude 
for mathematics. On leaving School he entered the service of Nobels, Limited, 
and had just completed his apprenticeship in their statistical department when 
he was mobilised. Like many more of our boys, he was an active member of 
the 6th H.L.I., and was called up on the first day of the war. He proceeded 
with his regiment to Gallipoli, and took part in the sanguinary struggle for 
Achi Baba, where so many of our old boys laid down their lives. Struck down 
with dysentery, he was for a time in hospital at Malta, and later was invalided 
home. In February, 1917, he received his commission in the Machine Gun 
Corps, and crossed to France soon after. He came through some severe fighting 
round Bullecourt, for whose possession some of the most memorable struggles of 
the war took place. On the 3rd May, 1917, he took out three sections of his men 
on a reconnoitring expedition, but failed to return. Every effort was made to 
learn his fate, his brother Douglas, who was in the same area, joining in the 
search, but all to no purpose, and he was eventually posted " missing, presumably 
killed." In war, as in peace, his bright and buoyant nature gained him many 
friends, who greatly deplore his loss. 

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MARK S. WATSON, M.A. 
2nd Lieutenant, 1st Batt. H.L.I. 

Mark Watson, eldest son of the Rev. Richard Watson, Headingley, Leeds, 
and formerly minister of St. John's Wesleyan Church, Sauchiehall Street, Glas- 
gow, was a pupil of the School from 1906 until 1911. There he is still remem- 
bered for his radiant personality, his high gifts, and the glowing promise of his 
future. After a year at the Morgan Academy, Dundee, where he gained many 
distinctions, including a Ferguson Bursary and the Gold Medal for English, he 
returned to Glasgow for his University course. He graduated M.A. in June, 
1915, and was accepted shortly after as a candidate for the ministry of the 
Wesleyan Church. But instead of entering the Theological Hall he accepted 
a commission, and went out to fight in what was to him both the cause of his 
country and a great ethical conflict. 

On his twenty-first birthday, 15th May, 1916, he left home for Mesopotamia, 
where he was attached to the 1st H.L.I. On the 11th of January, 1917, he fell 
while leading his men against the Turkish positions on the right bank of the 
Tigris, near Kut. Notable testimonies to his character, gallantry, and un- 
selfishness have been received from his lieutenant-colonel, chaplain, brother officers, 
and men of the regiment. 

Mark Watson was a man of outstandingly vivid and lovable personality, 
possessed of a strength and resolution older than his years, together with the 
enthusiasm and gaiety of heart of a boy. One remembers him as an eager and 
hard-working forward upon the football field (he gained his School cap in 1911); 
as a witty and arresting speaker in the Literary Society; as a student whose 
thinking was broad and original, and essentially honest; and, when need arose, 
as a keen and efficient soldier. But many remember him above all as a friend; 
for no man could wish for a better friend than Mark Watson. He shared whole- 
heartedly in their life, bringing to each a nature full of sympathy and humour, 
strength of heart, and a splendid purity that was far too sunny and unconscious 
ever to seem reproachful or aloof. It was natural to be at one's best when with 
him; it was natural to share joys with him, and to turn to him in difficulties. 

This is the man we have lost, and the country has lost. But we know that 
the sacrifice was no useless one; we know, too, that the qualities which made us 
love and honour him, and which are now taken from our knowing, are not lost. 
And beyond our sorrow we are proud that it has been given to us, if only for 
a brief space, to have him among us . 

NORMAN CAMPION WATSON 

2nd Lieutenant, The Highland Light Infantry 

The younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Watson, Oakfield, University Avenue, 
Glasgow, Norman C. Watson was only twenty-three years of age when he fell in 
action in one of the many fierce engagements which ebbed and flowed for days round 
Cavalry Farm. Norrie, as he was generally called, was a diligent student at 
School, and took a foremost place in all its athletic activities. His high spirits 
and generous nature made him a great favourite with his comrades. After leaving 
School he was an outstanding figure in the F.P. Rugby section. He was ever an 
eager, untiring worker in the pack, and there was no danger of bad feeling coming 
into a game in which Norrie Watson was engaged. He received his business train- 
ing in the Allan Line office, but five years ago he accepted an appointment on the 

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Hilihead-High School 



staff of the Canadian Bank of Commerce, Winnipeg. When war began he was one 
of the first to volunteer for service overseas, but an injury to his knee prevented 
him from coming over with the first detachment. With his regiment, the 79th 
Cameron Highlanders of Canada, he saw much hard fighting for about a year around 
Ypres, but passed unscathed through it all. His friend and old schoolfellow, Lieut. 
Charles A. Hepburn, R.F.A., was sent with his battery to support this section of 
the Canadian line, and he and Norrie had many pleasant hours together during the 
winter of 1915-16. Lieut. Hepburn writes — " He was always so bright, so 
optimistic, and so full of life that he dispelled gloom in every one he met. The 
other members of his company loved him and never wearied reciting incidents of 
his self-sacrifice and devotion to duty. All this is just what we expected of Norrie, 
for in the old days he always played up and played the game." At the beginning 
of 1917 he was given a commission in the Cth H.L.I. , but was attached to the 12th 
H.L.I. With them he came safely through the opening stages of the battle of 
Arras, and for his good work during those trying days he was recommended to the 
notice of his commanding officer. On the 24th April, 1917, he fell while leading 
his men in an attack on Cavalry Farm. Second Lieutenant Watson has left behind 
a legacy of happy memories which his friends and old schoolfellows will ever cherish. 

WILLIAM W. WATT 

Private, 8th Seaforth Highlanders 

Private Watt, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Watt, 23 Cranworth Street, was only 
seventeen years of age when he joined the 8th Seaforths. He was, however, a big 
powerful fellow, and would pass for much older. After leaving School he entered 
Templeton's mill in Stirling, and was held in great regard by his comrades and the 
heads of the firm. He was an enthusiastic Scout in the 1st Glasgow Troop, and to 
the last took a keen interest in all its doings. After the Battle of Loos, 25th 
September, 1915, he was reported wounded and missing, and nothing more has been 
heard of him. The last authentic glimpse we get of him is from his sergeant, who 
wrote — " When last seen he was fighting gallantly, and was down for recommend- 
ation on account of his great bravery in the fight." 

R. W. GORDON WEBSTER 

Private, 4th Batt. The Gordon Highlanders 

Private R. W. Gordon Webster, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Webster, 
4 Ashgrove Terrace, was born in Glasgow in 1899, and educated at Glasgow Academy 
and Hillhead High School. At School he showed ability much above the average, 
and all his work was marked by neatness, accuracy, and thoroughness. Gordon was 
of a singularly lovable disposition, and was held in the highest esteem by teachers 
and classmates alike. Upright in character, honest, and steadfast in purpose, 
bright, gentle, and sympathetic in disposition, he has left behind a legacy of 
precious memories. On leaving School he entered the head office of the National 
Bank of Scotland in Glasgow, and in 1916 passed the Associates' Examination of 
the Bankers' Institute of Scotland. In August, 1917, he joined The Gordon High- 
landers, and after training at Tillicoultry, Canterbury, and Colchester he left for 
France in March, 1918. In four months he saw a good deal of fighting round Arras, 
and on the 18th July he was sent with his division to aid the French in repelling 
the great German attack west of Rheims. The heroic part played by these British 

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Biographies 



troops called out a unique tribute from the French General, Berthelot. There, in 
Courton Wood, the gallant Gordon fell during heavy fighting on the 23rd July. 
His commanding officer writes in highly appreciative terms of his bravery as a 
soldier, while one of his comrades says — " Living with him for a year as intimately 
as the Army mates can do, and as we did by choice, I got to know him very well, 
and among all the people I have ever met I do not know of a finer character or a chap 
who could make a better friend. He was always true to his principles, and so bright 
and cheery." 

ROBERT CLELAND WILLIAMSON 

Lance-Corporal, 1/1 st Scottish Horse 

Lance-Corporal R. C. Williamson was the eldest son of Mr. J. G. Williamson, 
286 Byres Road, Glasgow, and was educated at North Kelvinside H.G. School and 
Hillhead High School. He did not remain long enough at School to make a deep 
impression on our School life, but he is remembered for his lovable disposition, 
his sincerity of purpose, and his kindly nature. On leaving School he entered the 
office of Messrs. Bulloch, Lade & Co., Limited, Glasgow. His favourite pastime 
was running, and he was an enthusiastic member of the West of Scotland Harriers. 
Bowling and tennis engaged his attention in the summer time, and he was well and 
favourably known on the greens and courts of Woodend, Jordanhill. When the war 
began he was one of the first to join up. He enlisted in the 1/lst Scottish Horse, 
and was for a long time in training at Kettering and Newcastle. He went with his 
regiment to Egypt, and thence in November, 1915, to the Dardanelles. He was 
wounded at Suvla Bay on the 9th December in the fighting preliminary to the 
evacuation of that dear-bought place. He died on board the hospital ship " Kura- 
para " on the 14th December, and was buried at sea. 



STEPHEN DE THIERY WILLIAMSON 

2nd Lieutenant, 2nd Batt. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 

Second Lieutenant S. De T. Williamson was another of our young 
being only eighteen years of age when he fell in action on 12th March, 1915. He 
was the son of the late Mr. Stephen Williamson and Mrs. Williamson, 9 Queen 
Margaret Crescent. He was educated at Hillhead High School and Fettes College. 
A tall, handsome figure, he looked every inch a soldier, and he merely did what 
every one expected of him when he joined the Cameronians at the very beginning 
of the war. Lieutenant Williamson was a radiant spirit, and diffused happiness 
around him. He came of a fighting stock, as his great-grandfather, Chevalier De 
Thiery, acted as despatch rider to the Allied Army at the Battle of Waterloo. 
Lieutenant Williamson is still another of the many " only sons " who have fallen 
in this war. The heartfelt sympathy of the whole School goes out to his widowed mother. 



OSWALD WILSON 

2nd Lieutenant, 5th Batt. The Prince of Wales's 
(North Staffordshire Regiment) 

Second Lieutenant Wilson, whose sisters reside at 45 Montgomerie Street, 
Kelvinside North, received all his education in Hillhead High School. After a short 

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business career in Glasgow, he joined the firm of Messrs. F. & R. Johnson, tile 
manufacturers, Stoke-on-Trent. He was well known and much esteemed for many 
years in the English pottery district. When war began he was one of the gallant 
band of men in good positions who did not wait for commissions, but enlisted in 
the ranks. The Seaforths, though a north-country regiment, seems to have had a 
special attraction for Hillhead pupils, and Oswald Wilson, on joining, found himself 
iu thoroughly congenial company. After a period of training he left for France in 
April, 1915. He was wounded at the Battle of Loos, and was for a time in hospital 
in England. On his recovery he was granted a commission in the 5th North 
Staffordshire, and left for France in September, 1916, where he was attached to the 
2nd York and Lancaster Regiment. He took part in much hard fighting during the 
Battle of the Somme, and won the respect of all his brother officers and the 
confidence of his men. On the 19th March, 1917, while gallantly holding a most 
important post against an attack by the Germans, he was struck by a bomb and 
killed instantaneously. The adjutant of the regiment writes — " We all felt his 
loss very much, as his type of officer one does not come across very frequently these 
days, viz., a man gifted with courage, intelligence, and common sense combined." 



FRED. C. YOUDEN 

Lieutenant, 15th Batt Australian Infantry 

Fred C. Youden was one of four brothers who rallied to the colours in 
the period of stress. He was in Australia when war began, and he was one of 
the first to answer the call. He joined as a private, but he was quickly promoted 
through all grades of non-commissioned rank, and finally granted a commission 
because of his daring and resource. He was a man of fine physique, of an open, 
frank nature, and greatly beloved by all who knew him. He seemed destined for 
high rank, but he fell in an action in Gallipoli. His memory is enshrined in the 
recollection of those who were associated with him in the old School. 



ANDREW CURRIE 

Driver, 12th Field Artillery Brigade, A.I.F. 

Driver Andrew Currie was the third son of the late Mr. John Currie, 7 Kelvinside 
Terrace, North. He was a pupil of the School from 1893 till 1900, when he left to 
enter his father's business, Kelvinside Bakery. He was a straightforward reliable 
youth at school, somewhat reserved in manner but trusted both by his comrades and 
teachers. An open-air life had always an attraction for him, and when opportunity 
offered he left for Australia, where he engaged in farming. Here the call to arms 
found him, and his response was instant. He joined up in September, 1914, and went 
with the first contingent to Egypt. He took part in the historic landing at Cape 
Hellas and came through safe. In July, 1915, he was reported killed, but this happily 
proved to be unfounded, although he was severely wounded and sent to hospital at 
Malta. On his recovery he was transferred to the Artillery, and after a period of 
training joined his comrades on the Western front. There he came through much 
hard fighting unscathed, only to become the victim of a fatal accident at Vimereux on 
the 4th December, 1917. The School gladly pays tribute to Driver Currie as one of 
the noble band of old Boys who rallied from the ends of the earth in the hour of their 
country's danger. 

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